Saturday, February 25, 2017

Robinson R44, N44EK: February 24, 2017, December 18, 2005, August 03, 2002



http://registry.faa.gov/N44EK 


CHATHAM, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — A helicopter made a crash landing in a suburban New Jersey neighborhood Friday night.


Chopper 2 was over the scene in Chatham, where the 1,500 pound helicopter made a hard, emergency landing around 6:30 p.m.


“I think the pilot, from my vantage point, did a wonderful job landing this helicopter where he did and could have averted catastrophe,” a Chatham spokesperson told reporters.


The Robinson R44 was traveling from Richmond, Virginia to Lincoln Park, New Jersey when it came down in the parking lot of an apartment complex on Main Street, narrowly missing the residential buildings and the people inside. However, the helicopter’s tail did hit a community garage, according to the FAA.


Neighbors told CBS2’s Jessica Layton this is something they never expected to see in their small, quiet town.


“It’s kind of surreal,” resident Jeff Andrews said.


Andrews was enjoying the warm weather Friday night when he noticed the helicopter flying dangerously close to the ground.


“It looked really low in the sky and it just kind of lunged forward, and we heard a bang. It sounded like it hit metal or something,” he said.


“We heard what we thought was an explosion,” another resident, Sarah Schwarz, said. “I was concerned it fell on the apartments. I ran over to make sure they were safe.”


The 54-year-old pilot from New Jersey walked away nearly unscathed, while his passenger was taken to a local hospital with back pain. They are both expected to be OK.


“Well I feel like there were angels looking out for a lot of people today,” Schwarz said.


The crash happened about three miles south of Morristown Airport.


An investigation is underway.


Story and video:   http://newyork.cbslocal.com




CHATHAM-- A helicopter went down near an apartment complex on the 500 block of Main Street around 6:30 p.m. Friday.

Information on injuries was not immediately known, but it does not appear that any structure on the ground suffered significant damage. Police did not immediate respond to requests for information Friday night. 


Sean Flood, who lives nearby, said he saw a man grabbing items from the craft as police and firefighters secured the scene. The helicopter appeared to have struck a one-story garage before hitting the ground, Flood said. 


The FAA later confirmed the tail hit a garage near the Chatham Village Apartments, located about three miles south of Morristown Airport. 


Two people were aboard the helicopter, a Robinson R44 built in 1999. The helicopter is registered to an owner in Newark, Del., according to the FAA.  


Story and photo gallery: http://www.nj.com





CHATHAM, New Jersey (WABC) -- The cause of a helicopter crash in the parking lot of an apartment complex in New Jersey is under investigation.

At the Chatham Village Apartments Friday evening, the Robinson R44 helicopter made a sudden crash landing in the complex's parking lot just before 6:30 p.m.

"We heard something we thought was an explosion, and we all stopped and tried to figure out what was going on," said Sarah Schwarz, a witness.

Miraculously, the body of the helicopter remained mostly intact during the crash and the pilot walked away uninjured, but his passenger was taken to a nearby hospital.

Investigators said the 30-foot helicopter, weighing more than 1,400 pounds, left from Richmond, Va., and was heading toward Lincoln Park, N.J., when there was a malfunction. The FAA and NTSB are now studying the crash.

City officials said considering how close this landing was to several power lines and homes, it could have been a lot worse.

"I think the pilot from my vantage point did a wonderful job landing this helicopter where he did and could've averted catastrophe," said Stephen Williams, police information officer of the Chatham Borough. "He crashed right in between the garages and the complex, like of all places to land, I mean there was a lot of angels out there."

Witnesses describe hearing a small explosion that drew people from every direction to this parking lot just behind the apartment complex in Chatham. The helicopter's tail hit a garage.

"I see the helicopter was coming, it was a little high," said Jose Cascant, a witness. "I see the guy is coming around from the buildings and he tried to go."
The 54-year-old pilot from New Jersey could walk, but witnesses said his passenger seemed to be in a lot of pain.

"I saw one man who was up and walking around and checking on everything and making sure that the helicopter was safe and stabilized, and the other gentlemen who was in the helicopter was injured, but he was conscious," another witness said.

Story and video:  http://abc7ny.com



































Additional Participating Entity:
FAA/FSDO; Teterboro, New Jersey

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


NTSB Identification: NYC06LA035
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Accident occurred Sunday, December 18, 2005 in Linden, NJ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/25/2007
Aircraft: Robinson R44, registration: N44EK
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


The Robinson R-44 helicopter experienced a loss of engine power on the initial climb after takeoff, during an instructional flight. The certified flight instructor (CFI) conducted an autorotation to a nearby construction site; however, the helicopter's skids dug into the muddy ground, and the main rotor blades contacted the tail boom. Examination of the helicopter did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions. The CFI reported 1,920 hours of total flight experience, which included about 300 hours in the accident helicopter make and model.


The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

A loss of engine power for undetermined reasons.

On December 18, 2005, about 1220 eastern standard time, a Robinson R44 helicopter, N44EK, was substantially damaged during a forced landing after takeoff from Linden Airport (LDJ), Linden, New Jersey. The certificated flight instructor (CFI) and a student pilot were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the local instructional flight conducted under 14 CFR Part 91.


The CFI reported that as the helicopter climbed after takeoff, it began to vibrate and experience a loss of engine power. The CFI conducted an autorotation to a nearby construction site that was located about 1/4 mile from the approach end of runway 27. During the autorotation, the helicopter's skids dug into the muddy ground, and the main rotor blades contacted the tail boom.


Review of maintenance records revealed that the helicopter had been operated for about 20 hours since its most recent annual inspection, which was performed on November 10, 2005. 


Subsequent examination of the helicopter by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airworthiness inspector, and other maintenance personnel did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions. 


The CFI reported 1,920 hours of total flight experience, which included about 300 hours in the accident helicopter make and model.


The reported temperature and dew point at an airport about 5 miles northeast of the accident site, about the time of the accident, was 37 and 21 degrees F; respectively. Review of a carburetor icing probability chart placed the reported temperature and dew point in the "serious icing - glide power" range of the chart.


Additional Participating Entity: 
FAA FSDO-17; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: NYC02LA157
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Accident occurred Saturday, August 03, 2002 in Atlantic City, NJ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/17/2003
Aircraft: Robinson R-44, registration: N44EK
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that while on final approach to the heliport, the wind shifted, which resulted in a higher sink rate and ground speed. To compensate, the pilot flared "harder" than normal, and the tail rotor struck the heliport perimeter fence. The reported wind speed at an airport approximately 10 miles away was from 130 degrees at 8 knots, with no gusts.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's improper flare during approach.

On August 3, 2002, about 1700 eastern daylight time, a Robinson R-44, N44EK, was substantially damaged while landing at the Steel Pier Heliport (92N), Atlantic City, New Jersey. The certificated commercial pilot and two passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the commercial sightseeing flight conducted under 14 CFR Part 91.

The pilot stated that he was completing a 3-minute sightseeing flight. During his final approach to the heliport, the wind shifted, which resulted in a higher than normal sink rate. Additionally, a higher than anticipated ground speed caused the pilot to flare "harder." Subsequently, the tail rotor struck the heliport perimeter fence, and the helicopter began to spin. However, the pilot was able to land the helicopter uneventfully at the heliport. The pilot added that prior to the collision, he did not experience any mechanical malfunctions with the helicopter.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the tail rotor and gearbox had separated from the helicopter. 

The reported winds at an airport approximately 10 miles west of the accident site, at 1654, were from 130 degrees at 8 knots, with no gusts.

No comments: