Saturday, February 25, 2017

Cessna 120, N77116 : Accident occurred February 24, 2017 at Orange Municipal Airport (KORE), Franklin County, Massachusetts

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA156
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, February 24, 2017 in Orange, MA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/10/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 120, registration: N77116
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, while attempting to land on the “grass portion of the runway” parallel to the paved runway, the ground was soft. Subsequently, the main wheels sunk into the ground, and the airplane nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to its right-wing lift strut and vertical stabilizer.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s selection of unsuitable terrain for landing, which resulted in a nose-over.

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that while attempting to land on the "grass portion of the runway", parallel to the paved runway, the ground was soft. Subsequently, the main wheels sunk into the ground and the airplane nosed over. 

The airplane sustained substantial damage to its right-wing lift strut and vertical stabilizer.

The pilot reported that there were no pre-accident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine 

Aviation Accident Factual Report / National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N77116

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA156
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, February 24, 2017 in Orange, MA
Aircraft: CESSNA 120, registration: N77116
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that while attempting to land on the "grass portion of the runway", parallel to the paved runway, the ground was soft. Subsequently, the main wheels sunk into the ground and the airplane nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to its right-wing lift strut and vertical stabilizer.

The pilot reported that there were no pre-accident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.



ORANGE — A single-engine plane flipped over on the runway at the Orange Municipal Airport Friday afternoon at around 3 p.m.

Police, firefighters and ambulances responded, although Bryan Camden, operations manager at Orange Municipal Airport, confirmed the male pilot was attended to by Orange Emergency Medical Services and released at the scene with no injuries.

“Everyone is safe and there was no real damage to private property,” Camden said.

According to Camden, the plane, a 1946 Cessna 120, flipped over after landing on unusually soft terrain, and came to a gentle stop. The plane had been previously upgraded to meet modern safety standards, saving the pilot — the only individual in the plane — from injury, though the plane sustained “moderate damage.”

“It was a routine landing, and due to some of the field conditions out here, some of the sod was softer than normal, which was a contributing factor,” he said. It definitely can happen at any airport, though it’s not a frequent occurrence. It’s a rarity.”

Though Camden declined to identify the pilot, he believed the man was from Turners Falls and in his 60s, with many years of flying experience.

“He was an avid flier, experienced pilot, and he was involved with several flying clubs such as the Experimental Aircraft Association,” he said.

Camden said the plane was removed from the runway at around 8 p.m., making the airport fully operational again.

Source:  http://www.recorder.com

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