Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Piper PA-32R-300 Cherokee Lance, Bidzy Ta Hot Aana Corp., N4352F: Accident occurred November 21, 2016 in McGrath, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

BIDZY TA HOT AANA CORP: http://registry.faa.gov/N4352F

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fairbanks FSDO-01


Aviation Accident Preliminary Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ANC17LA014
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Sunday, November 20, 2016 in McGrath, AK
Aircraft: PIPER PA 32R-300, registration: N4352F
Injuries: 1 Serious, 3 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 20, 2016 about 1657 Alaska standard time, a Piper PA-32R-300 airplane, N4352F, sustained minor damage following a partial landing gear collapse during the landing rollout on Runway 16 at the McGrath Airport, McGrath, Alaska. The airplane was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) on-demand charter flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 when the accident occurred. The airplane was operated by Bidzy Ta Hot Anna Corporation, dba Tanana Air Service. Of the four occupants on board, the certificated commercial pilot and two of the passengers reported no injuries. On December 5, the fourth passenger contacted the National Transportation Safety Board's (NTSB) Alaska Regional Office to report that she had sustained serious injuries as result of the landing gear collapse event. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the McGrath Airport and company flight following procedures were in effect. The flight departed Shageluk Airport, Shageluk, Alaska, destined for Nikolai Airport, Nikolai, Alaska, before diverting to the McGrath Airport. 

On December 21, the pilot provided a written statement to the NTSB investigator-in-charge (IIC) stating, in part, that while approaching Nikolai, the airplane's electrical system began to malfunction. He said that as the flight neared Nikolai, and as he prepared for landing, he placed the landing gear selector handle in the down position to extend the landing gear. The pilot said that both main landing gear wheels extended, and cockpit indications confirmed they were down and locked, but the nose landing gear did not extend and the cockpit indicator warned of an unlocked/unsafe condition. He then attempted to retract the landing gear and divert to the McGrath Airport, but the landing gear did not retract. Once arriving overhead of the McGrath Airport, the pilot flew a number of low approaches over the runway so ground personnel could determine the landing gear position. The pilot then completed the emergency landing gear extension checklist before flying another low approach over the runway, which confirmed that the nose landing gear wheel was still in the retracted position. Unable to get the nose gear to extend, he elected to land the airplane with the engine shut down to avoid extensive engine damage. He stated the touchdown was uneventful and the nose of the airplane was held off the runway for several hundred feet as the speed of the airplane slowed. During landing rollout, the left main landing gear retracted, and the left wing contacted the runway surface. The airplane continued to slide about 200 feet before coming to rest on the centerline of the runway. 

The airplane sustained minor scraping damage to the outboard edge of the left aileron. 

In a written statement to the NTSB dated December 11, the injured passenger stated that during the landing, the airplane "hit the ground hard and began to slide." Following the impact, she said she felt her back "jar" and knew she was injured. She further stated that although complaining of neck and back pain, she received no medical attention while in McGrath. She said that three days later, after traveling to Seattle, Washington, she sought medical attention, which revealed a fractured L2 Vertebrae.

Several witnesses on the ground stated that as the airplane touched down smoothly on the runway, and the nose was lowered, the left main landing gear collapsed and the left wing contacted runway. The deceleration was slow and did not appear to be abrupt. 

On December 6, during a telephone conversation with the NTSB's Alaska Regional Office Chief, a McGrath Village Public Safety Officer (VPSO), along with an Alaska Wildlife State Trooper, both reported that they were asked to standby during the airplane's emergency landing at McGrath. Both consistently described the touchdown and landing rollout as a very controlled and smooth landing event. The VPSO reported that he specifically asked all four occupants if there were any injuries, and all replied no. 


At 1653, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) from the McGrath Airport reported, in part: wind calm; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition, clear; temperature -9 degrees F, dewpoint -17 degrees F; altimeter, 29.64 inHg.

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ANC01LA145
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Nonscheduled 14 CFR
Accident occurred Friday, September 21, 2001 in Tanana, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/26/2002
Aircraft: Piper PA-32R-300, registration: N4352F
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The certificated commercial pilot was about 26 miles from his destination airport when be began to note telltale signs of an electrical failure. The airplane's instrument panel-mounted ammeter indicated zero, and the pilot shut off all of the airplane's electrical equipment. When he arrived at the destination airport, he placed the landing gear extension handle in the down position, but the gear failed to extend, and the gear down lights did not illuminate. The pilot followed the flight manual procedures for an emergency gear extension by slowing the airplane to 87 knots, holding the landing emergency gear lever in the "EMERGENCY DOWN position, while fish-tailing the airplane. In an attempt to determine if the landing gear was down, he checked the airplane's shadow and noted that the gear appeared to be down. During touchdown the left main landing gear collapsed, and the left wing struck the surface of the runway. A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the voltage regulator failed, which subsequently led to the loss of electrical power. The accident airplane is equipped with a retractable tricycle landing gear, which is hydraulically actuated by an electrically powered reversible pump. Use of the emergency extension handle manually releases hydraulic pressure, allowing the landing gear to free fall, to the down position. In the case of a complete electrical failure, the landing gear down lights will not illuminate. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
An unlocked landing gear mechanism during landing roll. A factor associated with the accident was an electrical system failure.

On September 21, 2001, about 1730 Alaska daylight time, a wheel-equipped Piper PA-32R-300 airplane, N4352F, sustained substantial damage during landing at the Tanana Airport, Tanana, Alaska. The airplane was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) on-demand charter flight transporting mail under Title 14, CFR Part 135, when the accident occurred. The airplane was owned by Harold Esmailka, and operated by Tanana Air Service, Inc., Fairbanks, Alaska. The solo commercial pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and company visual flight rules (VFR) flight following procedures were in effect for the flight from Fairbanks to Tanana. 

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge on October 2, the director of operations for the operator reported that while en route to Tanana, the accident pilot's intended destination, all electrical power was lost. He added that the accident pilot elected to proceed to his destination, and during the landing roll, the left main landing gear collapsed. He said that the left wing struck the surface of the runway, and sustained substantial damage to the left main wing spar, and two nose ribs. 

The pilot submitted a written report to the NTSB dated October 12, 2001. In his written statement, the pilot reported that when he was about 26 miles from the Tanana Airport, be began to note telltale signs of an electrical failure. He added that the airplane's instrument panel-mounted ammeter indicated zero, so he shut off all of the airplane's electrical equipment. He noted that when he arrived at the destination airport, he placed the landing gear extension handle in the down position, but the gear failed to extend, and the landing gear down lights did not illuminate. He reported that he followed the flight manual procedures for an emergency gear extension by slowing the airplane to 87 knots, holding the landing emergency gear lever in the "EMERGENCY DOWN position, while fish-tailing the airplane. In an attempt to determine if the landing gear was down, he checked the airplane's shadow and noted that the gear appeared to be down. During touchdown the left main landing gear collapsed, and the left wing struck the surface of the runway. 

The Piper PA-32R-300 is equipped with a retractable tricycle landing gear, which is hydraulically actuated by an electrically powered reversible pump. The emergency landing gear extension handle, when used for emergency extension of the landing gear, manually releases hydraulic pressure to permit the gear to free fall with spring assistance on the nose gear. In the case of a complete electrical failure, the landing gear down lights will not illuminate. 

A Federal Aviation Administration, Airworthiness Inspector, Fairbanks Flight Standards District Office, reported that a postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the voltage regulator failed, which subsequently led to the loss of electrical power. 

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