Thursday, May 17, 2012

Glasair III (Mfr. Rotherwick, HR), International Metals Trading and Investments LTD, N471B: Accident occurred May 17, 2012 in Darby, Montana

NTSB Identification: WPR12CA213
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, May 17, 2012 in Darby, MT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/15/2012
Aircraft: Rotherwick HR Glasair III, registration: N471B
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, about 2 hours into a visual flight rules cross-country flight, he enriched the mixture due to indications of excessive cylinder head and exhaust gas temperatures. This resulted in a higher fuel burn than planned, so he changed the flight’s destination to a closer airport. While en route to his amended destination, he encountered instrument meteorological conditions. A subsequent buildup of ice resulted in a loss of 100 knots of airspeed as the airplane entered a controlled descent. The pilot executed a 180-degree turn and broke out of the clouds over a valley. During the next 50 minutes, he made several attempts to exit the valley; however, mountain peak obscuration and a thunderstorm prevented him from flying out of the valley. Now very close to fuel exhaustion, he elected to land on a two-lane highway. During the landing roll, the airplane veered off the side of the road, impacted a tree, slid backwards through a ditch, and collided with a concrete drainage culvert. The airplane sustained damage to the outboard sections of both wings.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot’s loss of directional control during an emergency landing on a paved highway

***This report was modified on August 7, 2012. Please see the dcoket for this accident to view the original report.***


The pilot reported that, about 2 hours into a visual flight rules cross-country flight, he enriched the mixture due to indications of excessive cylinder head and exhaust gas temperatures. This resulted in a higher fuel burn than planned, so he changed the flight’s destination to a closer airport. While en route to his amended destination, he encountered instrument meteorological conditions. A subsequent buildup of ice resulted in a loss of 100 knots of airspeed as the airplane entered a controlled descent. The pilot executed a 180-degree turn and broke out of the clouds over a valley. During the next 50 minutes, he made several attempts to exit the valley; however, mountain peak obscuration and a thunderstorm prevented him from flying out of the valley. Now very close to fuel exhaustion, he elected to land on a two-lane highway. During the landing roll, the airplane veered off the side of the road, impacted a tree, slid backwards through a ditch, and collided with a concrete drainage culvert. The airplane sustained damage to the outboard sections of both wings.



 NTSB Identification: WPR12CA213 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, May 17, 2012 in Darby, MT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/15/2012
Aircraft: Rotherwick HR Glasair III, registration: N471B
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.


NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, about 2 hours into a visual flight rules cross-country flight, he enriched the mixture due to indications of excessive cylinder head and exhaust gas temperatures. This resulted in a higher fuel burn than planned, so he changed the flight’s destination to a closer airport. While en route to his amended destination, he encountered instrument meteorological conditions. A subsequent buildup of ice resulted in a loss of 100 knots of airspeed as the airplane entered a controlled descent. The pilot executed a 180-degree turn and broke out of the clouds over a valley. During the next 50 minutes, he made several attempts to exit the valley; however, mountain peak obscuration and a thunderstorm prevented him from flying out of the valley. Now very close to fuel exhaustion, he elected to land on a two-lane highway. During the landing roll, the airplane veered off the side of the road, impacted a tree, slid backwards through a ditch, and collided with a concrete drainage culvert. The airplane sustained damage to the outboard sections of both wings.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s loss of directional control during an emergency landing on a paved highway.

***This report was modified on August 7, 2012. Please see the dcoket for this accident to view the original report.***


The pilot reported that, about 2 hours into a visual flight rules cross-country flight, he enriched the mixture due to indications of excessive cylinder head and exhaust gas temperatures. This resulted in a higher fuel burn than planned, so he changed the flight’s destination to a closer airport. While en route to his amended destination, he encountered instrument meteorological conditions. A subsequent buildup of ice resulted in a loss of 100 knots of airspeed as the airplane entered a controlled descent. The pilot executed a 180-degree turn and broke out of the clouds over a valley. During the next 50 minutes, he made several attempts to exit the valley; however, mountain peak obscuration and a thunderstorm prevented him from flying out of the valley. Now very close to fuel exhaustion, he elected to land on a two-lane highway. During the landing roll, the airplane veered off the side of the road, impacted a tree, slid backwards through a ditch, and collided with a concrete drainage culvert. The airplane sustained damage to the outboard sections of both wings.

DARBY – A single-engine aircraft was forced to make an emergency landing on West Fork Road south of Darby Thursday afternoon after running into bad weather, according to Ravalli County Sheriff Chris Hoffman.

The plane, with two adult males onboard, left Portland, Ore., at about 12:30 p.m. and was scheduled to make a stop in Billings before heading on to Minnesota.

Neither man was significantly injured in the landing, which occurred at about mile marker 1.2. However, the plane did sustain some heavy damage after it skidded to a halt in a ditch.

“They ran into bad weather and could not reach an airport that was outside of the weather they were in,” Hoffman said. “Weather conditions were the most contributing factor. The front apparently blew in pretty quickly. The pilot reported that his wing started to ice, and he was starting to get low on fuel. They found a hole in the weather and decided to attempt an emergency landing. When he hit the roadway, after he dodged some cars, he hit the brake and the wind picked up and spun him into the ditch. The plane sustained significant damage to the wing, undercarriage and propeller.”

Hoffman said the pilot apparently circled several times to make sure there were no cars on the road before attempting to land, although the plane did come down in front of one vehicle.

Responders from the Montana Highway Patrol, the Ravalli County Sheriff’s Office, the Hamilton Airport and other emergency services responded to the scene, Hoffman said. Officials from the Federal Aviation Administration were on their way from Butte to investigate the situation as well.

Hoffman said the names of the two men haven’t been released. The FAA were to interview the two men Thursday evening.

Source: http://missoulian.com/news


http://registry.faa.gov/N471B


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 471B        Make/Model: EXP       Description: GLASAIR
  Date: 05/17/2012     Time: 2223

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Minor     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: DARBY   State: MT   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED ON A ROAD AND WENT INTO A DITCH, NEAR DARBY, MT

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   2     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: HELENA, MT  (NM05)                    Entry date: 05/18/2012 

 
NTSB Identification: WPR11CA022
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 21, 2010 in Colville, WAProbable Cause Approval Date: 03/16/2011
Aircraft: Rotherwick Glasair III, registration: N471B
Injuries: 2 Minor.
 
The pilot reported that he was landing the airplane in calm wind conditions. The airplane touched down midway down the runway at stall speed. Upon touchdown, the pilot retracted the flaps and applied brake pressure, including full aft elevator, in an attempt to bring the airplane to a stop. With the end of the runway approaching, the pilot applied left brake in an effort to turn the airplane to the left and the airplane nosed over off the end of the runway. The pilot stated that he checked the brakes prior to flight, but felt that they did not function normally during the landing. A witness reported that when the airplane was landing, it floated in ground effect until about 100 feet beyond midfield. The landing gear contacted the runway and the airplane continued to decelerate until disappearing over the end of the runway. According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector that responded to the accident, skid marks led from the runway to the location where the airplane came to rest. The FAA inspector examined the braking system following the accident and found no mechanical anomalies. At the time of this writing, the pilot had not submitted NTSB Form 6120.1, the Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident/Incident Report.
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's misjudged approach and failure to attain the proper touchdown point, which resulted in a runway overrun.

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