Friday, September 23, 2011

THORP T-18, N54WB: Fatal accident occurred September 23, 2011 in Plainwell, Michigan

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

National Transportation Safety Board - Docket And Docket Items:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board -  Aviation Accident Data Summary:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N54WB

NTSB Identification: CEN11FA663 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 23, 2011 in Plainwell, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/21/2012
Aircraft: THORP T-18, registration: N54WB
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The accident airplane was the second airplane in a flight of two airplanes on approach to the destination. The pilot in the first airplane stated that there were no radio transmissions by the accident pilot of any mechanical malfunctions and that the accident pilot asked him to keep up his speed on final. The visibility on approach was about 3 miles. A witness observed that the second airplane was close to the first airplane and that both airplanes were “quite” low on approach. He indicated that the accident airplane impacted a semitrailer and “flipped” into the ditch embankment west of the runway. A ground fire ensued when the airplane impacted terrain. A postaccident examination of the wreckage revealed no preimpact anomalies.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot did not maintain clearance from a semitrailer along the approach path.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 23, 2011, about 0853 eastern daylight time, N54WB, an experimental amateur-built Thorp T-18, owned and operated by the private pilot, sustained substantial damage when it impacted a semi-trailer and terrain while on approach to runway 9 at the Plainwell Municipal Airport (61D), near Plainwell, Michigan. A ground fire occurred. The pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the personal flight. The flight originated from the Tulip City Airport, near Holland, Michigan, about 0830.

The accident airplane was the second airplane in a flight of two airplanes destined for 61D. The pilot in the first airplane stated that there were no radio transmissions by the accident pilot of any mechanical malfunctions and that the accident pilot asked him to keep up his speed on final. He stated that there was a haze layer that he had to fly through which was located about 400 feet above ground level. The haze layer was localized around the river and airport. He stated that the visibility under the haze layer was about three miles.

A witness, working on a bridge near the accident site, reported to the Michigan Highway Police that he observed that the second plane was close to the first airplane. He stated that both airplanes were “quite” low on approach. He indicated that the accident airplane impacted the semitrailer and “flipped” into the ditch embankment west of runway 9.

Another witness who was in a southbound vehicle saw the airplane impact the semitrailer. This witness indicated the visibility was “good” and that he did not see any fog.

A ground fire ensued when the airplane impacted terrain.


PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 73, held a private pilot certificate with single-engine land and instrument airplane ratings. His most recent medical certificate was a third class issued on July 20, 2011, without any limitations. A family member estimated that the pilot had accumulated approximately 1,921 hours of total flight time and 1,311 hours of total flight time in the accident airplane.


AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The plans to build the accident airplane were sold to the pilot on September 27, 1974. A logbook endorsement showed that the last condition inspection was completed on March 2, 2011. There were no airframe hours listed in that endorsement entry. However, a family member indicated that the airplane accumulated about 1,311 hours of total flight time.


METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 0853, the recorded weather at the Kalamazoo/Battle Creek International Airport, located about 15 nautical miles and 165 degrees from the accident site, was: wind calm; visibility 6 statute miles; present weather mist; sky condition clear; temperature 11 degrees C; dew point 9 degrees C; altimeter 30.09 inches of mercury.


AIRPORT INFORMATION

61D is a public, non-towered, airport located about 2 miles north of Plainwell, Michigan, at a surveyed elevation of 722 feet above mean sea level. The airport featured two runways: 9/27 and 1/19.

Runway 9, which was 2,650 feet by 50 feet dry asphalt, had a 17-foot road, 201 feet from the runway end, a 4-foot fence, 50 feet from the runway end; and a 17-foot road, 140 feet from the runway end entries listed as obstructions. The runway had 191 foot displaced threshold.


WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

An on-scene examination of the wreckage was conducted. All of the flight control surfaces were found with the wreckage. The cabin area was melted, charred, and deformed consistent with involvement with a ground fire. The outer portions of the flight controls’ push-pull tubes were intact and their respective control surface moved when the tubes were moved by hand. The rudder control cables were intact and the rudder moved when the cables were moved by hand. No flight control preimpact anomalies were detected. The engine produced a thumb compression at all cylinders when the propeller was rotated by hand. The magneto sustained fire damage and its internal distributor gear was melted. The magneto produced spark at its center electrode when it was rotated by hand. The mechanical fuel pump ejected a liquid when its pump lever was manipulated by hand. No engine preimpact anomalies were detected.


MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Allegan County Medical Examiner arranged for an autopsy to be performed on the pilot. The autopsy listed the cause of death as smoke and soot inhalation and thermal burns.

The FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute prepared a Final Forensic Toxicology Accident Report. The report was negative for the tests performed.



Remembering a fellow pilot and a friend



(NEWSCHANNEL 3) – A Holland man was killed Friday morning in a fiery plane crash as he tried to land in Allegan County.

73-year-old William Beswick was coming in for a landing at the Plainwell Municipal Airport when he crashed into a FedEx semi truck heading north on US-131. The plane instantly burst into flames.

Construction crews working on a nearby overpass saw the whole thing. They'd been watching planes come and go every day, and say it was clear Beswick's was too low.

The plane hit the back of the semi and the burning wreckage came to a rest on the grass just shy of the runway.

The driver of the truck was uninjured, but was certainly shaken up.

Investigators from the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board were out on the scene Friday looking over the wreckage. Witnesses say there was limited visibility at the time of the crash.

“As I understand, it was clear all around, with the exception of the airport and fog developed right here,” said airport manager Virgil Williams.

Weather is just one factor that will be investigated. A NTSB investigator says he plans to have a preliminary report complete next week, but a final report could take six months to a year.

William Beswick built the plane himself in the 1980s. His son told Newschannel 3 that his father was very proud of the aircraft. Friends say Beswick was a good pilot and they don't think he would have tried to land if conditions were too dangerous. They believe there may have been a mechanical issue.

Beswick leaves behind five children, 15 children and his wife, Peg, with whom he had just celebrated 50 years of marriage.

On Friday morning Beswick was flying into Plainwell to meet a friend for breakfast. That friend landed safely just moments before Beswick crashed. He spoke to Newschannel 3 on Friday.

Ken Dannenberg says he and Beswick started flying and building planes in the late 1960s. They've logged thousands of hours in the air. Dannenberg says he and Beswick became close friends and started flying together about twelve years ago and since have flown from Holland to Plainwell hundreds of times.

Dannenberg says he and Beswick never had any problems, until Friday.

The trip from Tulip City to Plainwell started without a hitch.

“We checked the weather and it was perfect view at 8,000 feet,” said Dannenberg.

Dannenberg says the weather changed quickly as they approached Plainwell.

“A little fog hanging over the airport, maybe 300 feet above the airport,” said Dannenberg. “As I approached, about a half-mile out, I could see the length of the runway.”

Dannenberg says he landed with ease, pulled off the runway and turned to look for his friend.

“I expected to see him rolling in on the runway and there was nobody there,” said Dannenberg. “Then I turned my radio back on and I gave him a call on the radio, I said 'Bill, where are ya,' I called him twice and no answer.”

It was about that time that a pick-up truck pulled up.

“They stopped a minute and rolled their window down and said an airplane crashed at the west end of the runway,” said Dannenberg.

Dannenberg's long time friend and flying companion had come in short of the runway and crashed into a semi on US-131. Dannenberg says the plane exploded on impact.

“Somehow he got too low,” said Dannenberg. “I don't know why.”

However, Dannenberg does have an idea, one based on a radio transmission from Beswick just before landing.

“On final he called me,” said Dannenberg. “He said, 'keep your speed up, I'm right behind you.”

Dannenberg says Beswick's plane had a narrower wing span than his, meaning it doesn't have the same glide ratio.

“It probably comes in a little faster,” said Dannenberg. “He might have unconsciously slowed the airplane up because he was gaining on me, and thereby the sink rate begins to get a little faster.”

Dannenberg says he doesn't believe Beswick had mechanical problems. The NTSB is investigating. The agency says the three main points of any crash investigation are the pilot, the plane and the weather.

http://www.wwmt.com


Photo Credit:  Mark Bugnaski | Kalamazoo Gazette

Crews are on the scene this morning of a fatal airplane crash at Plainwell Municipal Airport. The plane clipped the trailer of a FedEx semi-truck as it was coming in for a landing in the fog.














(NEWSCHANNEL 3) – The pilot who died in a Friday morning crash in Plainwell is being remembered as a loving husband, father and grandfather.

73-year-old William Beswick was a popular pilot in the Holland area. Before the crash in Plainwell, Beswick took off from the Tulip City Airport in Holland.

Friday's crash has been devastating for the many people who knew Beswick, a man with four children and 15 grandchildren who are now trying to make sense of what happened.

Beswick was proud of the plane he put together in the early 1980s. His son, Jeff, told Newschannel 3 that he would spend hours with his father when he was younger, helping to put the plane together from a kit.

Beswick had recently put a fresh coat of paint on the plane when the crash happened.

His family declined to comment on camera, but his son told us; “He's been a pilot since the 1960s. He loved to fly and did it nearly every day he could.”

Beswick would often bounce around Michigan from his home in Holland, taking his plane up in the early morning hours, often just to go have breakfast with a friend.

“I think there's a lot of people who would like to fly and do that,” said Ron Ludema, Tulip City Airport director. “It's fun to do, you want a reason to go somewhere and that's a good reason to do it, you're retired and you have the time. I'd love to do it.”

Ludema says he was devastated to hear the news that his friend was dead.

“It's such a tragedy to hear that,” said Ludema. “It's really tough to have to hear something like that happen, like anything, you hate to lose a friend.”

Beswick spent his final evening with his family. His son tells Newschannel 3 that he was always actively involved, a man who just celebrated his 50th anniversary with his wife Peg.

Jeff told Newschannel 3; “He was a great father and grandfather and his grandchildren's activities were his activities. He was at my son's soccer game last night, so he was one of those grandparents that we all look forward to being really.”

Two of Beswick's children are pilots as well.




HOLLAND -- The plane that crashed today on U.S. 131 was a low-wing, home-built plane, Tulip City Airport manager Ron Ludema said.

The two-seater was classified as an experimental Thorp T18 single engine twin seat, built in 1978, he said.

Pilot William Beswick, 73, who died in the crash, flew the plane from Holland's Tulip City Airport this morning.

He crashed on U.S. 131, hitting a FedEx truck, next to the Plainwell Municipal Airport, where he was headed. Fog may have been a factor in the crash, police said..

Ludema said pilots who fly such aircraft are meticulous in the building and maintenance. The pilots use design plans to build their own planes, a process that usually takes years.

“They're very safe,” Ludema said. “In fact, these guys, they spend so much time, they're meticulous in how they build them.”
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State police have identified William Frank Beswick, 73, of Holland, as the pilot killed today when his plane crashed onto U.S. 131.

Beswick flew out of Holland's Tulip City Airport at 8:15 a.m., and crashed into a truck on the highway near the Plainwell Municipal Airport.

He was flying an experimental Thorp T18 single engine twin seat, built in 1978, according to state police.

Beswick and his wife, Peg (Biesel) Beswick, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary one month ago.

They have four children, Jeffrey Beswick of Grand Haven, David Beswick of Lake Odessa, Susan Bylsma of Hudsonville and Ann Bates of Olive Township, and 15 grandchildren.
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ALLEGAN COUNTY, Mich. (NEWSCHANNEL 3) – Police and emergency crews are on the scene of a plane crash on northbound US-131.

A small plane has crashed into a Fedex truck while trying to land at the Plainwell Airport.

It happened shortly before 9:00 am this morning. The airport manager says that fog was rolling in when the crash happened. The plane burst into flames after hitting the truck.

The northbound lanes of the freeway were closed from M-89 to M-222. Traffic is moving again, but everything is going slowly. Avoid the area if you are headed that way.

The pilot of the plane was been killed in the crash. The driver of the truck is out of the vehicle and walking.

The plane is registered as an experimental amateur-built craft owned by a man in Holland. It is a THORP T-18 that was made in 1978.

The airport manager says that the pilot was coming in to have breakfast with another pilot, which they do regularly.
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PLAINWELL, Michigan - A pilot was killed after a plane crashed while trying to land at the Plainwell Municipal Airport, according to Michigan State Police.

The plane clipped a FedEx semi-truck trailer along the northbound lanes of U.S. 131 near the 106th Avenue exit around 8:30 a.m. Friday, state police said. The plane then caught on fire.

The pilot was the only person aboard the two-seater plane, state police said, and the truck driver was not injured.

Airport officials told 24 Hour News 8 it was foggy at the time. They said the plane was arriving from Tulip City Airport in Holland.

State police said the plane is registered to a Holland resident.

Officials with the FAA and National Transportation Safety Board are en route to the scene to investigate.

One lane of northbound U.S. 131 and the on-ramp from 106th Avenue are closed.
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PLAINWELL, Michigan - A plane that officials of Plainwell Municipal Airport said was a regular visitor from the Holland area crashed while attempting to land at that facility this morning, reportedly killing the pilot, who was the only person onboard the aircraft.

No names were immediately disclosed as the mid-morning incident closed the northbound lanes of US-131 north of M-89, between Kalamazoo and Grand Rapids, for a time. Eyewitnesses said that the two-seat plane was attempting to land at the airport when one of its wings apparently clipped the trailer of a northbound FedEx semi, forcing the craft to crash into flames nearby. There was no injury suffered by the trucker or anyone else on the ground.

State Police and Allegan County Sheriff's investigators are expected to be augmented by those from the Federal Aviation Administration as the probe into this incident has begun.

Similar plane hit Howell house in June

Thorp T-18, N8AL

Two people died in the crash of this experimental aircraft in Howell on June 29, 2011. 



GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) - A plane similar to the experimental aircraft that clipped a FedEx truck along US-131 and crashed Friday morning also crashed in Howell in June, killing two people.

WDIV in Detroit reported the plane crashed into a house on the evening of June 29, 2011. John Nowak, 70, and Patrick Lee Charles, 43, died at the scene.

One man was at home at the time of that crash, but he was not injured.

In the Plainwell crash Friday, Michigan State Police said the plane is registered to a Holland resident. 24 Hour News 8 learned the plane, a Thorp T18, is classified as an experimental aircraft and built in 1978. It is a single-engine, twin-seat aircraft.





http://www.woodtv.com 

 NTSB Identification: CEN11FA431
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 29, 2011 in Howell, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/14/2014
Aircraft: BOSONETTO THORP T-18, registration: N8AL
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The purpose of the accident flight was for the pilot to obtain a flight review in the airplane that he owned. A witness reported seeing the airplane at a higher-than-normal glidepath to the runway and traveling at a slow airspeed while in a forward-slip maneuver. (A forward slip is a flight maneuver used to increase the descent rate, while maintaining airplane pitch and airspeed.) The witness stated that, while the airplane was in the forward slip and losing altitude, it suddenly entered a right spin and descended out of his view. Another witness reported seeing the airplane yawing side-to-side as it approached the runway and then hearing the engine increase to full power as the airplane simultaneously pitched up. The airplane then nosed over and descended into his front yard. A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The low-altitude stall/spin encountered during final approach was likely not recoverable. Toxicological testing revealed the presence of several medications in both the pilot and flight instructor; however, it is not likely that they resulted in any impairment.


The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain airplane control and airspeed during final approach, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall/spin at a low altitude.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 29, 2011, at 1915 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Bosonetto model Thorp T-18, N8AL, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain and a house while maneuvering to land at the Livingston County Airport (OZW) near Howell, Michigan. The pilot and flight instructor were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the private pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the instructional flight, which originated at an unknown time from Canton-Plymouth-Mettetal Airport (1D2) near Plymouth, Michigan.

The purpose of the accident flight was for the pilot to obtain a flight review. A witness to the accident, who was located in his airplane near the departure end of runway 31, reported seeing the airplane in the traffic pattern for runway 31. He stated that after the airplane had turned onto the final approach it was higher than the normal glide-path to the runway and appeared to be traveling at a slow airspeed while in a forward-slip maneuver. (A forward slip is a flight maneuver used to increase the descent rate, while maintaining airplane pitch and airspeed.) The witness stated that while the airplane was in the forward-slip, losing altitude, it suddenly entered a spin to the right and descended out of his view.

Another witness, who was inside his residence located along the final approach path, reported that he saw the airplane yawing side-to-side as it approached runway 31. He stated that he heard the airplane engine increase to what sounded like full power simultaneously as the airplane pitched-up. The airplane then nosed-over and descended into his front yard before ultimately colliding with the south wall of his residence. The witness reported that the engine continued to operate at full power until the airplane collided with his residence.

Another witness, who was driving westbound on M-59 toward the airport, reported seeing the airplane on final approach to runway 31 when it suddenly rolled to the left and right before it descended behind a nearby treeline and out of his sightline.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

-- Pilot --
According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot, age 43, held a private pilot certificate with a single engine land airplane rating. His last aviation medical examination was completed on November 7, 2006, when he was issued a third-class medical certificate with no limitations or restrictions. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings.

The most recent pilot logbook entry was dated November 13, 2010. At that time, the pilot had accumulated 166.3 hours total flight time. The logbook indicated that all of his flight experience had been completed in single-engine land airplanes, which included 43.4 hours in the accident airplane. The first flight in the accident airplane was dated February 8, 2009. The logbook indicated that he had flown 13.2 hours during the past year; none of that time was during the previous 6 months. However, the accident airplane's hour meter suggested that the pilot could have flown as many as 6.6 hours in the accident airplane during the 6 month period preceding the accident. The pilot's previous flight review was completed on April 5, 2009, in a Cessna model 152 airplane. The pilot's flight logbook included an endorsement to operate tailwheel equipped airplanes, which was dated February 17, 2007.

-- Flight Instructor --
According to FAA records, the flight instructor, age 70, held a commercial pilot certificate with single engine land airplane and instrument airplane ratings. He also held a flight instructor certificate with single engine airplane and instrument airplane ratings. His last aviation medical examination was completed on December 24, 2010, when he was issued a third-class medical certificate with a limitation that he wear lenses for distance vision and possess glasses for near vision. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings.

The most recent pilot logbook entry was dated July 1, 2010, when the flight instructor completed a flight review in a Piper model PA-28R airplane. The logbook did not include any forwarded flight times, and as such, an accurate flight history could not be determined with the information collected during the investigation. According to FAA records, on December 13, 2006, the flight instructor reported having accumulated 4,750 total flight hours on his application for a medical certificate. He did not report his flight experience on subsequent medical applications. The flight instructor kept a provisional record of his completed flights in his personally owned Piper model PA-28R airplane. According to this airplane flight log, his last recorded flight was completed on June 27, 2011. He had flown the Piper model PA-28R airplane 100 hours during the past year, 45 hours during the prior 6 months, 19 hours during previous 90 days, and 4 hours during the preceding 30 days. The flight instructor reportedly had not flown with the pilot or in the accident airplane before the accident flight.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a 1982 Bosonetto model Thorp T-18 amateur-built airplane, serial number (s/n) 238. A 150-horsepower Lycoming model O-320-A1A reciprocating engine, s/n L-2285-27, powered the airplane. The airplane was equipped with a fixed-pitch, two blade, Sensenich model W66LM74 wood propeller. The tail wheel-equipped airplane had a maximum takeoff weight of 1,600 pounds.

The accident airplane was issued an experimental airworthiness certificate on November 10, 1982. The airplane was reissued an airworthiness certificate on July 9, 1987, after it was modified with a new engine and propeller combination. The airplane hour meter indicated 268.7 hours at the accident site. The airframe had accumulated a total service time of 577.1 hours at the time of the accident. The engine had accumulated 127.9 hours since a field overhaul on July 9, 1987. The last condition inspection was completed on June 1, 2011, at 571.5 total airframe hours. A postaccident review of the maintenance records found no history of unresolved airworthiness issues.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1914, the OZW automated surface observing system (ASOS) reported: wind from 300 degrees at 7 knots, visibility 10 miles, clear sky, temperature 25 degrees Celsius, dew point 8 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 30.06 inches of mercury.

AERODROME INFORMATION

The Livingston County Airport (OZW) was located about 3 miles northwest of Howell, Michigan, was served by a single runway: 13/31 (5,002 feet by 100 feet, concrete). The airport elevation was 962 feet mean sea level (msl). The elevation of the runway 31 threshold was 943 feet msl. A four-light precision approach path indicator (PAPI) was installed for runway 33.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

A postaccident investigation confirmed that all airframe structural and flight control components were located at the accident site. The main wreckage was located about 0.34 miles southeast of the runway 31 threshold and was facing a north-northwest heading. A ground depression consistent with an initial impact of the aft fuselage was located about 40 feet south-southeast of the main wreckage in a residential front yard. The ground depression continued on a north-northwest heading to where the airplane had impacted a brick wall of a residence.

The main wreckage consisted of the entire airframe, flight controls, and engine. A fractured propeller blade was found underneath the aft fuselage. There were additional propeller blade fragments located along the wreckage debris path and in the back yard of the residence. All observed structural component failures were consistent with overstress separation. Flight control continuity was established between the individual flight control surfaces and their respective cockpit controls. The flap position could not be determined due to impact damage. The throttle and mixture controls were found in the full forward position. The carburetor heat control was found partially engaged. The magneto switch was found in the LEFT position. The fuel tank, located in the forward fuselage behind the instrument panel, was breached consistent with impact damage and contained residual fuel.

The engine remained attached to the firewall. Internal engine and valve train continuity was confirmed as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The upper spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. Both magnetos provided spark on all leads when rotated. There were no obstructions between the air filter housing and the carburetor inlet. The fuel supply line to the carburetor and the carburetor bowl both contained fuel. A fuel sample was free of any water or particulate contamination. The carburetor inlet screen was free of any particulate contamination. Mechanical continuity was confirmed from the engine components to their respective cockpit engine controls.

The postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

On June 30, 2011, autopsies were performed on the pilot and flight instructor at Sparrow Forensic Pathology Services located in Lansing, Michigan. The cause of death for the pilot and flight instructor was attributed to multiple injuries sustained during the accident.

The FAA's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on samples obtained during the pilot's autopsy. No carbon monoxide, cyanide, or ethanol was detected. Amlodipine was detected in urine and blood samples. Amlodipine is a long-acting calcium channel blocker used to lower blood pressure and to treat anginal chest pain.

CAMI performed tests on samples obtained during the flight instructor's autopsy. No carbon monoxide or ethanol was detected. 0.6 ug/ml of cyanide was detected in blood samples. Alfuzosin was detected in blood and urine samples. Azacyclonol was detected in urine samples but not in blood samples. Dextromethorphan and dextrorphan were detected in urine and blood samples. Fexofenadine was detected in urine and blood samples. Naproxen was detected in urine samples. Rosuvastatin was detected in urine samples but not in blood samples.

Alfuzosin, brand name Uroxatral, is a medication for benign prostatic hypertrophy and has minimal cardiovascular effects. Dextromethorphan, sold under multiple brand names, is a cough medication and is metabolized into dextrorphan. Fexofenadine, brand name Allegra, is a non-sedating antihistamine and is metabolized into azacyclonol. Naproxen, brand name Alleve, is a non-sedating analgesic. Rosuvastatin, brand name Crestor, is a medication to treat high cholesterol and prevent heart disease.

SURVIVAL ASPECTS

According to first responders, upon their arrival at the accident site, the pilot was not wearing his lap-belt or shoulder harness. The flight instructor was wearing both his lap-belt and shoulder harness.

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