Wednesday, August 18, 2021

Cessna 172G Skyhawk, N4110L: Accident occurred August 07, 2021 in Athol, Kootenai County, Idaho

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane

Aircraft windshield imploded and structural damage occurred during spin training.  


Date: 07-AUG-21
Time: 17:33:00Z
Regis#: N4110L
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: MANEUVERING (MNV)
Operation: 91
City: ATHOL
State: IDAHO

6 comments:

  1. I bet that the windshield wasn't the only thing that imploded.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Interesting..the airspeed during a spin would be low..I wonder if there was fuselage flex around the windshield. Or, maybe, "spin training " was 20 minutes of flight training spent mainly on spins, but also involved some high airspeed..a not so good spin recovery that "got fast". That's why they call it training, though.
    Also, maybe just coincidental timing. Thin, old windshield, years of UV, old stop drilled cracks...I can picture the scene. Or bird?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Not much altitude loss, 1966 bird, old enough for a replacement windshield to get UV'd to weakness. Pilots doing spin training may want to check the logs and set a personal time limit on accepting trainers with older windscreen plastics.

    Here is the track, zoomed to the spin:
    https://globe.adsbexchange.com/?icao=a4da3a&lat=47.948&lon=-116.677&zoom=20.4&showTrace=2021-08-07&trackLabels&timestamp=1628358364

    ReplyDelete
  4. I trained in a 1985 172P model back in the late 1980s including spin training. We put that nearly new bird for the era through hell and back (Cessna stopped making the 172 after 1986 for 10 years). I would NOT want to do spins in a 55 year old 172 no matter how new the windscreen is.

    ReplyDelete
  5. The problem with spinning C172 and C152 is they are designed to resist spin entries. So in training instead of getting into a low airspeed spin it ends up being a high speed spiral and an overstressed airframe upon pull out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No it does not end up being high speed on entry or exit when executed properly.

      Delete