Tuesday, November 17, 2020

Cessna 150L, N18666: Fatal accident occurred November 16, 2020 in Colton, Clackamas County, Oregon

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances in mountainous terrain. 


Date: 16-NOV-20
Time: 14:04:00Z
Regis#: N18666
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 150
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: Fatal
Total Fatal: Two (2)
Aircraft Missing: Yes
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: COLTON
State: OREGON

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Jared Scott Sabin, 44, and Gavyn Scott Sabin, 19, of Salem, Oregon

https://www.gofundme.com


Crews work to clear a remote logging road as they search for a missing plane carrying a father and son in Mt. Hood National Forest, November 18th, 2020.

PORTLAND, Oregon (KOIN) — A small plane missing over Mt. Hood National Forest since Monday has been found along with human remains, deputies said.

The search was hindered by treacherous, steep terrain burned by wildfires in September. Searchers finally located the crash site on Thursday and recovered the remains of two men, deputies said Friday. Autopsies are being carried out to confirm their identities.

The Cessna 150 was carrying a father and son — Jared Scott Sabin, 44, and Gavyn Scott Sabin, 19, both of Salem — when it left Salem on Monday. The pilot planned to stop in Troutdale before continuing on to Idaho and then Utah, according to the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office.

But during the flight, the pilot contacted aircraft controllers and said ice was starting to form on the plane amid bad weather. The pilot said he wanted to change destinations and controllers lost contact with the plane a few minutes later.

A large search and rescue mission was launched involving multiple agencies, including a pararescue team with the U.S. Air Force Reserve Command and a Navy helicopter.

Wreckage was spotted Thursday in the Fish Creek area and rescuers on the ground reached the site by about 2 p.m.

Autopsies were scheduled for Friday.


Three Pararescue Specialists, known as PJ’s, and two Navy Search and Rescue Med Techs left Portland on a U.S. Navy MH-60 helicopter to the search location November 18th, 2020. 

PORTLAND AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, Oregon -- The 304th Rescue Squadron here sent three pararescue specialists to assist civilian agencies in locating a downed aircraft November 18th near Mt. Hood, Oregon.

Just after 6 a.m. on November 16th, the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office was made aware of a small plane may have crashed in a remote area of the Mt. Hood National Forest in Clackamas County.

The Cessna 150 left Salem, Oregon, that morning; the pilot planned to stop in Troutdale, Oregon before continuing on to Idaho and then Utah. The pilot reported having trouble due to bad weather and reported that ice was beginning to form on the plane. The pilot expressed his intent to change destinations. Air traffic controllers lost contact with the plane a few minutes later.

Clackamas County Sheriff's Office Search & Rescue (SAR) Coordinators launched a mission to locate and then respond to the presumed crash scene enlisting help from many local, state, and federal search agencies.

The downed aircraft is believed to have crashed in Fish Creek Basin, approximately seven miles from the closest access point. This is considered one of the more difficult wilderness areas to reach and wildfire damage has left the area additionally hazardous and difficult to navigate. Challenges include an elevation gain of nearly 7,000 feet, land and rock slides, fallen trees, and a lack of a navigable trail system. The search team was not able to reach the suspected site location on Nov. 17 due to these adverse conditions.

On Wednesday morning, civilian search and rescue personnel tried to locate a better access point using 4x4 vehicles but were unsuccessful.

A request came in to the 304 RQS for their expertise in personnel recovery in difficult terrain. Three PJ’s and two Navy Search and Rescue medical technicians left Portland on a U.S. Navy MH-60 helicopter to the search location. The search is on-going at the time of this news release.

The 304 RQS trains, equips, and deploys combat rescue officers, pararescue specialists, and support personnel worldwide in the interest of U.S. national security. The 304 RQS is part of the 943rd Rescue Group located at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, and is a geographically-separated unit of the 920 Rescue Wing at Patrick Air Force Base, Florida. 



U.S. Navy personnel have joined the search for two Salem men whose plane is believed to have crashed in rural Clackamas County earlier this week.

The Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office on Thursday said a Navy chopper was attempting to drop rescuers into the Fish Creek Basin area to investigate possible wreckage spotted by the Oregon Air Guard.

Jared Sabin, 44, and his son Gavyn Sabin, 19, are believed to have left Salem on Monday morning in a Cessna 150 for Troutdale, but they quickly encountered bad weather and told air controllers they were changing their destination. Controllers soon lost contact with them, but officials have determined what they believe is the general area of the crash.

Clackamas County Search and Rescue crews began searching for the plane crash Monday but have not been able to access the presumed crash site on foot due to difficult conditions, including landslides, elevation gain and impassable trails. Crews removed fallen trees on Wednesday, clearing about 14 miles of road and 2 miles of trail.





Clackamas County, Oregon – A plane has reportedly crashed in Clackamas county, but search crews can not find the wreck. T

he pilot and a passenger from Salem are still missing,  44-year-old Jared Sabin and his 19-year-old son Gavyn. 

Today the Clackamas County Sheriff’s office announced the plane went down early Monday morning, in the Fish Creek area of the Mt. Hood National Forest

The pilot planned to stop in Troutdale before going to Idaho and Utah. The pilot reported having trouble due to bad weather and reported that ice was forming on the plane just minutes before aircraft controllers lost contact with the plane.

Read more from the sheriff’s office:

Just after 6 a.m. on Monday, November 16th, 2020, the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office was made aware of concerns from aircraft controllers that a small plane may have crashed in a remote area of the Mt. Hood National Forest in Clackamas County.

The Cessna 150L had left Salem, Oregon that morning; the pilot planned to stop in Troutdale before continuing on to Idaho and then Utah.

The pilot reported having trouble due to bad weather, and reported that ice was beginning to form on the plane. The pilot expressed his intent to change destinations; aircraft controllers lost contact with the plane a few minutes later.

Fearing the worst, controllers contacted the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office.

Sheriff’s Office Search & Rescue (SAR) Coordinators launched a mission to locate and then respond to the presumed crash scene — enlisting help from:






as well as aircraft from the Civil Air Patrol, Hood River County Sheriff’s Office, and Oregon Army National Guard. Sheriff’s Office deputies are also deploying a drone to the area to help search the rugged terrain.

The mission has presented several complex factors — including pinpointing the plane’s exact location and navigating the complex, wildfire-damaged terrain.

Limited coordinates place the aircraft in the likely general area of Fish Creek, an area affected by the unprecedented September wildfires.

On Tuesday, November 17th, a CSAR hasty team attempted to reach the area the plane is believed to have crashed: in the Fish Creek Basin, approximately seven miles from the closest access point. This is considered one of the more difficult wilderness areas to reach in Clackamas County, and wildfire damage has left the area additionally hazardous and difficult to navigate; challenges include an approximate 7,000-foot elevation gain, land and rock slides, fallen trees, and a lack of a navigable trail system. The hasty team was not able to reach the site on Tuesday due to these adverse conditions.

Today (Wednesday, November 18th), search-and-rescue personnel tried to locate a better access point to the likely crash location using 4×4 vehicles, but were unsuccessful.  A request went out to the 304th Pararescue Squadron with the U.S. Air Force Reserve Command. At this writing, a U.S. Navy helicopter will soon deploy out of Whidbey Island, WA to pick up the pararescue crew and drop them in the wilderness in another attempt to locate the crash and any casualties or survivors.

At this writing, searchers have yet to spot any confirmed wreckage, despite drone and aircraft surveys of the area. There are currently six likely candidates for a crash area, based on possible final coordinates submitted by Seattle Center air-traffic controllers.

Missing are a father and son: Jared Scott Sabin, 44, and Gavyn Scott Sabin, 19, both of Salem. It is unknown at this time who was piloting the missing aircraft.

This is an ongoing mission. Updates will be posted when available.

There is no staging location for media at this time.



CLACKAMAS COUNTY, Oregon — A father and son went missing while flying in a small plane that presumably crashed in the Mount Hood National Forest early Monday, according to the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office. 

The missing persons were identified as Jared Sabin, 44, and Gavyn Sabin, 19, both of Salem. Authorities are not sure who was flying the plane. 

The pair flew out of Salem in a Cessna 150 aircraft with plans to stop in Troutdale before continuing to Idaho and Utah. Around 6 a.m. Monday, air traffic controllers notified the sheriff's office that a plane may have crashed in a remote wilderness area.

The pilot reported having difficulty flying because of poor weather conditions and said ice was beginning to form on the plane. Air traffic control lost contact a few minutes later, authorities said. 

The plane is believed to have crashed in the Fish Creek Basin south of Estacada. The presumed crash site is roughly seven miles from the closest access point.

"This is considered one of the more difficult wilderness areas to reach in Clackamas County, and wildfire damage has left the area additionally hazardous and difficult to navigate; challenges include an approximate 7,000-foot elevation gain, land and rock slides, fallen trees, and a lack of a navigable trail system," the sheriff's office said in a release. 

The sheriff's office deployed a search-and-rescue team that tried to find the crash site on Tuesday and Wednesday, but their attempts were not successful. 

No wreckage has been located despite drone and aircraft surveys of the area. 

The sheriff's office has requested the deployment of a U.S. Air Force Reserve pararescue crew to drop them into the wilderness so they can try to find the crash site as well as any casualties or survivors.

24 comments:

  1. Flightaware track includes weather image for 05:45 AM PST showing clouds in the area, possible disorientation, before sunrise.

    https://flightaware.com/live/flight/N18666

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    Replies
    1. 2020.10.08, sale reported. This is just beyond... Unreal

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  2. This couldn't have happened to a better father and son. They were truly decent human beings and they will be missed. Word of mouth says the wings iced over.

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    1. Given the broad availability of weather information, why do general aviation (GA) pilots continue to find themselves surprised and trapped by adverse weather conditions? This accident especially questions the training and judgement of "a commercial rated pilot who had been active in the Salem Composite Squadron of the Oregon Wing for several years.”

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  3. I live right off of Mcloughlin Blvd & heard a low flying plane around midnight. Sounded like it was having engine trouble, but couldn't really tell due to sleepiness. So Sad

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  4. Date: 16-NOV-20
    Time: 14:04:00Z is 6:04 am local time, Nov 16.

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  5. Sale Reported, Last Action Date 2020-10-08
    https://flightaware.com/live/flight/N18666/history/20201116/1310Z/KSLE/KTTD/tracklog
    RIP

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  6. La Nina winter is here. That means the northern 1/3 latitude of the US is going to be colder than normal (and remaining 2/3 to the south warmer than normal). If you live and/or fly north of 40 Latitude, pay close attention to weather this winter. Especially if you are on either coast or around the Great Lakes.

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  7. Airmen registry shows Gavyn having October 2020 commercial certificate and 2016 1st class medical. Son was the certified pilot if news reporting does not have father and son names reversed.

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  8. My heart is breaking for the Sabin Family! Prayers they find Jared and Gavyn!

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  9. Jared was a Flight Attendant. This has been very hard at the company.

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  10. Great work on the part of the Search and Rescue teams.
    Condolences to the family.

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  11. Weather report archive for KSLE shows 47F with light rain and mist.

    https://mesonet.agron.iastate.edu/cgi-bin/request/asos.py?station=SLE&data=all&year1=2020&month1=11&day1=16&year2=2020&month2=11&day2=17&tz=Etc%2FUTC&format=onlycomma&latlon=no&elev=no&missing=M&trace=T&direct=no&report_type=1&report_type=2

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  12. Under those conditions, I personally disagree and object to whomever committed the use of multiple federal resources including a pararescue team with the U.S. Air Force Reserve Command and a Navy helicopter.

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  13. I believe undue influences were used in the federal resources committed !!
    "The Oregon Civil Air Patrol said Gavyn Scott “was a commercial rated pilot who had been active in the Salem Composite Squadron of the Oregon Wing for several years.”

    “This is a painful loss, and we share this burden in our wing family,” said ORWG commander Col Nick Ham."

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    1. So, was the Sheriff wrong to request help from specialized military SAR after local agencies had tried to locate the crash for two days?

      And if the CAP had the ability to exert undue influence, wouldn't the 304th rescue squadron have been sent during the first two days of searching?

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    2. Fact is, preventable incidents resulting in search and rescue deployments happen more often than not. To suggest denying any victim of available and willing resources or benefiting from preferential treatment is not reality. If one of your family members was in a similar situation, you would (I assume) welcome any and all help.

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  14. I submit good real world training for SAR assets. Sad EMT skills weren’t needed.

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  15. Flying a 150 over mountains in winter with clouds,ice and snow to Idaho....yes brilliant idea....SMH!!!


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    1. Completely avoidable. The 150 is not the best choice for that type of flying. Maybe the last choice.

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  16. Many avoidable accidents share a "knowingly flew into unfavorable WX expecting to find a path through it" component.

    In-cockpit weather displays can be utilized to stay away from bad WX or for attempting to thread through it. Weather is dynamic and transmitted mosaic WX representations lag real time conditions. Tragic threading outcomes await many who venture past the point of safe turnaround.

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  17. I had to go to Bend, OR (driving) from Vancouver, WA that morning and left about the same time. Was looking at the weather on the way over to Hood and would not have wanted to be (or launched) in that in a 150. Sorry for the loss, but seemed to be completely avoidable with a WX brief (or even look out the window). Since I have some friends with their kiddos doing college tours in that same area from the PNW, I can't help but wonder if it was a similar type trip and a case of getthereitis.

    RIP All

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  18. Mishaps can happen anytime, to any pilot, and the occurrence is exacerbated when complacency and overconfidence replaces proper risk management.

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  19. If the "sale reported" status of the 150 was not a flight school or FBO purchase, it may indicate that the family had just bought the plane. The trip was planned and just like a new boat owner who goes out on the lake when a storm is brewing, the strong desire to take the planned trip using the new equipment influences the evaluation of the actual WX on departure.

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