Sunday, August 30, 2020

Landing Area Undershoot: Douglas C-118A Liftmaster (DC-6A), N451CE; accident occurred August 01, 2019 at Candle 2 Airport (AK75), Buckland, Alaska

Accident airplane at accident site.

Dirt and rock berm near threshold of runway 20, Candle 2 Airport.



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks, Alaska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N451CE



Location: Buckland, AK
Accident Number: ANC19LA045
Date & Time: 08/01/2019, 1400 AKD
Registration: N451CE
Aircraft: DOUGLAS C 118A
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing area undershoot
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 121: Air Carrier - Non-scheduled

On August 1, 2019, about 1400 Alaska daylight time, a Douglas C-118A (DC-6A) airplane, N451CE, sustained substantial damage while landing at Candle 2 Airport (AK75), Candle, Alaska. The captain and first officer, both certificated airline transport pilots and the certificated flight engineer were uninjured. The airplane was registered to Tatonduk Outfitters Limited and operated by Everts Air Cargo as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 supplemental air-cargo flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight departed Fairbanks, Alaska about 1140.

According to the captain, after overflying AK75, they entered the traffic pattern for landing on Runway 20, a remote, 3,880 ft. long, by 90 ft. wide gravel-covered runway. He added that down sloping terrain at the approach end of Runway 20 positioned the airplane closer to the terrain during the final stages of the approach. He stated that during touchdown near the runway threshold, he felt a bump, and the first officer exclaimed "we caught the right main gear." He said that in an effort to keep the airplane from veering to the right, he placed number 1, and number 2 engines in reverse pitch. In addition, the flight engineer applied asymmetric reverse to correct for the right turning tendency, and the airplane tracked straight for about 2,000 ft. It then veered sharply to the right and spun 180° resulting in substantial damage to the fuselage.

The crew stated there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

A postaccident inspection of the runway revealed several 4 ft tall piles of rocks and dirt at the threshold of runway 20.

A video, recorded by a bystander, captured the accident sequence and revealed that the airplane, while on short final approach, was low on the glide path and dragging its landing gear through vegetation located near the approach end of the runway. The video shows that, just before the main landing gear wheels reached the runway threshold, the right main landing wheel impacted a dirt and rock berm. The right main landing gear assembly separated, and the airplane continued straight down the runway before veering to the right, exiting the runway, and spinning about 180°. A copy of the video is included in the public docket for this accident.

Following the accident, the operator implemented several changes that included, but were not limited to, the following:

Develop a written short field procedure for the DC-6/C-46 aircraft and include the procedure in the Operations Manual.

Develop a short field flight and ground training segment to be included in the Flight Operations Training Manual.

Adjust airport risk assessment to account for high-risk/short-field airports, elevating the management alert criteria.

Develop a strict policy regarding conduct associated with visual means of glide path calculation/factors.

Develop a list of aircrews, to be maintained by flight control, that have had the appropriate training and may be used for high-risk/short-field airports.

The closest weather reporting facility was Buckland Airport (PABL), Buckland, Alaska. At 1356, PABL was reporting, in part: wind 250° at 11 knots, gusting 15 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; few clouds 4,100 ft; temperature 57°F; dew point 39°F; altimeter 30.01 inches mercury.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial; Flight Engineer
Age: 51, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/17/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/01/2019
Flight Time: 9910 hours (Total, all aircraft), 147 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 73 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial; Flight Engineer
Age:64, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied:Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/18/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/25/2018
Flight Time: 8316 hours (Total, all aircraft), 69 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 38 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Flight Engineer Information

Certificate:
Age: , Male
Airplane Rating(s):
Seat Occupied: Center
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s):
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s):
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification:
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 3025 hours (Total, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: DOUGLAS
Registration: N451CE
Model/Series: C 118A No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1953
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Transport
Serial Number: 43712
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats:5
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/27/2019, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 100000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 4 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 42037.3 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: R-2800-CB3
Registered Owner: Tatonduk Outfitters Limited
Rated Power: 2400 hp
Operator: Tatonduk Outfitters Limited
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Commuter Air Carrier (135); Supplemental; On-demand Air Taxi (135)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PABL
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 2156 UTC
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4100 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 11 knots / 15 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 250°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / 4°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Fairbanks, AK (PAFA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Buckland, AK (AK75)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1140 AKD
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Candle 2 (AK75)
Runway Surface Type: Dirt; Gravel
Airport Elevation: 15 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry; Rough
Runway Used: 20
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3880 ft / 90 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None
Latitude, Longitude: 65.907778, -161.926389

3 comments:

  1. A better video, same event. Kept the view on the bird.

    https://youtu.be/H7voLYFmuCI

    ReplyDelete
  2. I wonder if the vehicles parked on the side had any effect on the pilots decision making wrt the touch down area.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ^^No they were doing a short field landing and came up short, so to speak. Had nothing to do with what was on the side. That said, I wonder how well marked that threshold was on the ground. Doesn't sound like it was easily identifiable...the the absolute last thing you want missing in unprepared short field landing ops.

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