Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Collision During Takeoff: Cessna 180H Skywagon, N91402; accident occurred August 12, 2019 at Lake Hood Seaplane Base (PALH), Anchorage, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N91402

Location: Anchorage, AK
Accident Number: ANC19TA044
Date & Time: 08/12/2019, 1830 AKD
Registration: N91402
Aircraft: Cessna 180
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Collision during takeoff/land
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 12, 2019, about 1830 Alaska daylight time, a float-equipped Cessna 180 airplane, N91402, impacted the southeastern shoreline of Gull Island during takeoff from the Lake Hood Seaplane Base (LHD) Anchorage, Alaska. The airline transport pilot, the sole occupant, sustained minor injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a visual flight rules personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from LHD, about 1830.

The Lake Hood Seaplane base is comprised of two smaller lakes; Lake Hood to the west and Lake Spenard to the east, and the two lakes are connected by means of a canal. A small landmass situated within the canal, known as Gull Island, separates a water lane to the south, and a taxi lane to the north. Airplanes taking off and landing use the southern water lane.



According to the pilot, during the takeoff run to the west from Lake Spenard, once the airplane was on step, the sun was in his line of sight. He added that, the glare was too bright, and he was unable to distinguish the southerly water channel or see Gull Island. Subsequently, the airplane struck the southeastern side of the island, nosed over, and sustained substantial damage to the empennage, fuselage, and both wings.



The pilot added that, he believed that if the floatplane had not been so heavily loaded, the floats "might" have successfully cleared the island.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 84, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/01/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 8453 hours (Total, all aircraft), 771 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N91402
Model/Series: 180 H
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1969
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18052070
Landing Gear Type: Float
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/01/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2820 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4031.7 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-470-R
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PANC, 132 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0153 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 254°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 6000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 300°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting:
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Anchorage, AK (LHD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Mat-Su Borough, AK
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1825 AKD
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: LAKE HOOD (LHD)
Runway Surface Type: Water
Airport Elevation: 79 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Water--choppy
Runway Used: W
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4541 ft / 188 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor

Latitude, Longitude: 61.178889, -149.958333 (est)

Location: Anchorage, AK
Accident Number: ANC19LA044
Date & Time: 08/12/2019, 1825 AKD
Registration: N91402
Aircraft: Cessna 180
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 12, 2019, about 1825 Alaska daylight time, a float-equipped Cessna 180 airplane, N91402, impacted the southeastern shoreline of Gull Island during takeoff from the Lake Hood Seaplane Base (LHD) Anchorage, Alaska. The airline transport pilot, the sole occupant, sustained minor injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a visual flight rules personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from LHD, about 1825.

The Lake Hood Seaplane base is comprised of two smaller lakes; Lake Hood to the west and Lake Spenard to the east, and the two lakes are connected by means of a canal. A small landmass situated within the canal, known as Gull Island, separate a water lane to the south, and a taxi lane to the north. Airplanes taking off and landing use the southern water lane.

According to the pilot, during the takeoff run to the west from Lake Spenard, once the airplane was on step, the sun was in his line of sight. He added that, the glare was too bright, and he was unable to distinguish the southerly water channel or see the island that separated the departure and taxi waterways. Subsequently, the airplane struck the southeastern side of the island, nosed over, and sustained substantial damage to the empennage, fuselage, and both wings.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The closest weather reporting facility was Anchorage International Airport (ANC), Anchorage, Alaska. At 1753, ANC was reporting, in part: wind 300° at 7 knots; visibility 10 statute miles, few clouds 6,000 ft; temperature 73°F; dew point 55°F; altimeter 30.0 inches mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N91402
Model/Series: 180 H
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PANC, 132 ft msl
Observation Time: 0153 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 6000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 300°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Anchorage, AK (LHD)
Destination: Anchorage, AK

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 61.178889, -149.958333 (est)



One person was taken to the hospital Monday evening after a plane crash at Lake Hood Seaplane Base.

A spokesperson for the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport Police and Fire Department said the crash happened near the midway point between Lake Hood and Lake Spenard. Jim Szczesniak, the airport's manager, said a small floatplane had "some kind of an incident on takeoff." 

Rob Copier, who witnessed the crash alongside his family, said the pilot appeared to suffer only minor injuries.

"He couldn't get out by himself when they got there. The rescue people, they got him out," Copier said. "They walked him to the rescue boat."

Clint Johnson, National Transportation Safety Board Alaska Regional Chief, said it is too early to speculate what went wrong.

"Obviously, what we're going to be doing is looking to see if there were any mechanical issues with the airplane," Johnson said. 

The plane crashed right after it took off from the east around 6:30 p.m.

"It just started to kind of look like it had some engine trouble," Matt Copier said. 

Johnson said NTSB will be interviewing all of the witnesses and the pilot to determine the cause of the crash. Investigators said the pilot was the only person on the plane.

Story and video ➤ https://www.ktva.com




A pilot was injured when a floatplane crashed Monday evening at the Lake Hood Seaplane Base in Anchorage.

Airport police believe that the plane was taking off when it crashed in the middle of Anchorage’s Lake Hood on Gull Island, said Sgt. Mike Farmer with the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport Police and Fire. He said emergency crews were notified of the crash at around 6:30 p.m.

The sole occupant of the plane was taken to the hospital with minor injuries, Farmer said.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration registry, the Cessna 180 is registered to Arthur Terrell.

At around 8 p.m. Monday, Ken Kozlowski, a mechanic at the airport, was waiting on the banks of Lake Hood for authorities to escort him to the Cessna, which was still flipped. Kozlowski said he’d worked on the plane and had known Terrell for about 25 years. He was called to the airport to shut off an ELT beacon in the plane.

“He was very meticulous with his plane,” Kozlowski said of Terrell.

An official with the National Transportation Safety Board said the agency is preparing to begin its investigation with the FAA.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.adn.com

No comments: