Friday, May 24, 2019

Cessna 560 Citation Encore, N832R: Fatal accident occurred May 24, 2019 in Atlantic Ocean

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miami, Florida
Textron Aviation; Kansas City, Kansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N832R

Location: Atlantic Ocean, AO
Accident Number: ERA19LA180
Date & Time: 05/24/2019, 1755 EDT
Registration: N832R
Aircraft: Cessna 560
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Positioning 

On May 24, 2019, about 1755 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 560, N832R, was destroyed when it impacted the Atlantic Ocean. The airline transport pilot was not found and presumed fatally injured. The airplane was privately owned and operated, and the flight was being conducted as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 positioning flight. Day visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the accident, and an instrument flight rules flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from St. Louis Regional Airport (ALN), Alton, Illinois, about 1430 and was destined for Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport (FXE), Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

According to the owner of the airplane, he purchased the airplane two days prior to the accident. The airplane had recently undergone a progressive inspection, which was completed on May 22, 2019. The owner then hired a contract pilot to fly the airplane to FXE to have some avionics work done. On the day of the accident, the owner tracked the progress of the flight using an online commercial service once it departed ALN about 1430. Shortly after 1700, he received a call from the avionics shop at FXE telling him the airplane did not arrive. He then reviewed the airplane's online flight track again and saw that it had overflown FXE at FL390 and was heading toward the Atlantic Ocean.

According to preliminary air traffic control radar and radio communication information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration, the pilot established communications with the Atlanta Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) and reported he was level at FL390, and that the air was smooth. Later, the air traffic controller tried to communicate with the pilot to tell him to contact the Jacksonville ARTCC, but the controller was unable to make contact with the pilot. The controller made several attempts to contact the pilot on different radio frequencies, to no avail. The controller then advised Jacksonville ARTCC that communications with the flight had been lost. The Jacksonville controllers then continued to monitor the flight via radar. The flight transitioned through Jacksonville and Miami ARTCC airspace without any radio contact.

The US Air Force dispatched two aircraft to intercept the accident airplane. One of the interceptor pilots reported that he could see the pilot unconscious and slumped over the controls. The intercept airplanes followed the accident airplane until it descended and impacted the Atlantic Ocean about 310 miles east of FXE.

The US Coast Guard initiated a search after the accident, which was suspended on May 25, 2019. The pilot and the airplane were not recovered.

The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and multiengine land. His most recent FAA first-class medical certificate was issued on June 26, 2018. He reported 9,016 total hours of flight experience. He held numerous type ratings including a type rating for the Cessna 560 and had a certification for single pilot for the Cessna 560.

The airplane was manufactured in 2001, and it was powered by two Pratt and Whitney JT15D-5D engines. According to the airplane's owner, all of the airplane's maintenance logs were onboard the airplane during the accident flight. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N832R
Model/Series: 560 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFLL, 11 ft msl
Observation Time: 1753 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 413 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 19°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3800 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 15 knots / 20 knots, 70°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Alton, IL (ALN)
Destination: Fort Lauderdale, FL (FXE) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 27.323889, -72.593333 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Juan Carlos Gonzalez Mejia was at the controls of a small jet that crashed in the Atlantic Ocean about 300 miles east of Fort Lauderdale, the U.S. Coast Guard said Monday.

The search for the Cessna Citation V ended late Saturday after it crashed about 6 p.m. Friday.

"Suspending a search is one of the most difficult decisions we ever have to make, and we never make it lightly,” Christopher Eddy, search and rescue mission coordinator at Coast Guard 7th District, based in Miami, said in a statement.

“We always want the best case scenario to happen and will continue to monitor for new information that could aid responders," Eddy said.

Gonzalez Mejia was the only person aboard the plane. Pilots of Florida Air National Guard F-15s that were sent to intercept the Citation watched it crash into the ocean, the Coast Guard said.

In this case, “intercept” means the F-15s approached the Cessna and tried to communicate with the pilot.

Records show the plane is registered to a limited liability corporation in Manalapan, a barrier island off Lantana.

The aircraft left St. Louis Regional Airport in East Alton, Ill. at 1:35 p.m., an FAA spokeswoman said.

The plane was supposed to land at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport.

What caused the plane to crash remains unclear.

Before suspending its search, the Coast Guard conducted aerial searches concentrated in an area of 642 square nautical miles.

https://www.sun-sentinel.com


FORT LAUDERDALE, Florida  (WSVN) - The U.S. Coast Guard has suspended its search for the pilot of a Cessna 560 Citation Encore that crashed off the coast of South Florida.

According to the U.S. Coast Guard, the Cessna 560 Citation Encore had taken off from St. Louis Regional Airport, Friday afternoon, and was headed to Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport.

Officials said the aircraft crashed into the Atlantic Ocean, 221 miles northeast of the Bahamas.

Officials said the pilots of two F-15 fighter jets from the Florida Air National Guard witnessed the crash.

Officials said the pilot was only one on board. They said he was unable to reach air traffic control for more than an hour.

During that time, the Federal Aviation Administration tracked the flight on radar before the plane crashed.

Coast Guard conducted aerial searches covering 642 square nautical miles before calling off the search, late Saturday night.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://wsvn.com




FORT LAUDERDALE, Florida - A Cessna 560 Citation Encore crashed in the Atlantic Ocean Friday afternoon -- away from its designated flight path -- about 310 miles east of Fort Lauderdale, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. 

Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport air traffic controllers lost communication with the Cessna 560 Citation Encore and asked the U.S. Air Force to investigate.

The Florida Air National Guard dispatched two F-15 fighter jets from the Homestead Air Reserve. The pilots intercepted the Cessna 560 shortly before it went down. 

"Only the pilot was aboard," FAA spokesperson Kathleen Bergen wrote in an 8 p.m. e-mail. "The aircraft was out of communication with air traffic controllers for more than one hour before it crashed."

The Cessna 560 Citation Encore left from St. Louis Regional Airport in East Alton, Illinois, about 2:35 p.m., and it descended rapidly and crashed out in the ocean about 6 p.m., according to Bergen. The F-15 fighter jets did not fire at the Cessna 560 Citation Encore. 

According to FlightAware records, the N832R Cessna 560 Citation Encore, owned by Hypo Consulting LLC, made a sudden drop in speed about 5:45 p.m. AirNav RadarBox records show there were erratic changes in speed and altitude. 

The plane headed toward the Grand Bahama International Airport in Freeport, Bahamas, and crashed east of the Leonard M. Thompson International Airport in Mash Harbour, Bahamas. The U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater HC-130 Hercules airplane crew responded to the downed aircraft about 221 miles northeast of the Marsh Harbor, Bahamas. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.local10.com

A Cessna 560 Citation Encore headed for South Florida kept going and crashed into the Atlantic Ocean about 300 miles east of Fort Lauderdale on Friday night.

The Federal Aviation Administration said preliminary information indicates only the pilot was aboard the Cessna 560 Citation Encore, which flew out of St. Louis Regional Airport in East Alton Illinois about 1:35 p.m. Friday and was destined for Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport.

The aircraft crashed 310 miles east of Fort Lauderdale about 6 p.m., the FAA said.

The condition of the pilot is unclear, but the FAA said U.S. Air Force F-15 fighter jets from the Florida Air National Guard “intercepted,” or spotted the aircraft and flew alongside it, before it went down. The Florida Air National Guard is based at Homestead Air Reserve Base.

“The aircraft was out of communication with air traffic controllers for more than one hour before it crashed,” the FAA said in a statement. “FAA air traffic controllers tracked the flight on radar during that time.”

The FAA referred questions about the pilot’s condition to the U.S. Coast Guard. A spokesman for the Coast Guard’s southeast district said crews were responding to the crash but did not disclose further details Friday evening.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.miamiherald.com

U.S. Coast Guard crews are searching the Atlantic Ocean for a downed aircraft about 300 miles east of Fort Lauderdale, authorities said Friday night.

It is believed the pilot was the only person aboard the Cessna 560 Citation Encore when it crashed around 6 p.m., according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The plane is registered to a limited liability corporation in Manalapan, records show.

The aircraft left St. Louis Regional Airport in East Alton, Illinois at 1:35 p.m., an FAA spokeswoman said.

The plane was supposed to land at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport, she said.

“The aircraft was out of communication with air traffic controllers for more than one hour before it crashed,” said Kathleen Bergen, FAA’s spokeswoman.

“FAA air traffic controllers tracked the flight on radar during that time,” Bergen said. “U.S. Air Force F-15s intercepted the Cessna 560 Citation Encore shortly before it went down.”

It is unclear what caused the plane to crash or whether the pilot survived.

Flight records show that at 5:45 p.m. the Cessna 560 Citation Encore made a quick drop in speed and a slight drop in altitude. In one minute, it went from going 413 mph at 39,000 feet to 295 mph at 38,900 feet.

At 5:57 p.m. the aircraft’s flight path became erratic for about 13 minutes as it was seemingly tossed in all directions, flightaware.com records show.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.sun-sentinel.com

A Cessna 560 Citation Encore crashed Friday into the Atlantic Ocean 310 miles east of Fort Lauderdale, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The aircraft departed from St. Louis Regional Airport in Illinois at 1:35 p.m. CDT and was set to land at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport, the FAA said. It crashed at around 6 p.m.

Only the pilot was aboard the aircraft, the FAA said. 

"The aircraft was out of communication with air traffic controllers for more than one hour before it crashed," a statement from the FAA read. "FAA air traffic controllers tracked the flight on radar during that time."

The FAA said U.S. Air Force F-15s intercepted the jet shortly before it went down.

The U.S. Coast Guard has been called out to respond to the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.nbcmiami.com

16 comments:

Anonymous said...

Is this one of the Citation models approved for single pilot operations?

Or, was this a 'special' mission by a single pilot?

RIP

Anonymous said...

Sounds like another Payne Stewart type crash. The drop in airspeed most likely occurred when one engine flamed out due to fuel exhaustion and the plane being "tossed around" was the auto-pilot trying to maintain flight when the other engine flamed out. Sounds like the pilot became incapacitated for whatever reason. Wikipedia states the Encore can be flown by single pilot however most flights use 2 pilots. There's been a lot of Citations going down lately.

Anonymous said...

Owner N832R - Randall K. Rush (65 years old) * Recreation By Design (travel trailer manufacturer)
1444 Paslay Place, Manalapan, FL 33462

KW said...

So i could have sworn that the 560 was certified for a single pilot. Although I am not seeing it right away in the TCDS. A22CE is the Document that would show this. I do see that min crew is 2...but there may be an amendment that I am missing.

http://rgl.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Guidance_Library/rgMakeModel.nsf/0/679DCA15D542BA77862583B40077B0E8?OpenDocument

Unknown said...

Although the C-500 series type rating normally requires 2 pilots, there is a single pilot exemption which requires additional training and a check ride.

Anonymous said...

The 500 series has an stc'd sp exeption. Minimum rating, times and training requirements apply.

Anonymous said...

If memory serves, we took a CE550 on a short hop to the paint shop, and with only a bit of fuel and no pax, we had to have a second pilot up front to keep it within CG. I would imagine that a 560 with a single pilot, no gas, and an autopilot trying to maintain altitude would be a pretty unstable ride. That might explain the erratic decent to the water.

Anonymous said...

He had his fuel load just right right.

Anonymous said...

Wonder if this is the same guy ?
https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/convicted-felons-role-in-fema-contracts-questioned

Anonymous said...

Sure looks like it would be the same guy - not the felon, but the fellow that owns the trailer manufacturing company - there can't be too many Randall K. Rushs running rampant raking riches rearing recreational rigs, can there ?

Anonymous said...

The number of Randall Rushs running recreational rigs -- of all sorts -- is already a small number. Narrowed down further to include only those running rampant raking riches rearing recreational rigs and it's a very small number.

Anonymous said...



Still no positive ID on the pilot?

Anonymous said...

Juan Carlos González-Mejia

May he rest in peace.

Anonymous said...

Depression from recent divorce?

Unknown said...

DESCANSA EN PAZ QUERIDO AMIGO SIEMPRE TE RECORDARE,FUE UN GUSTO CONOCERTE.ADIOS.

Anonymous said...

Eternal rest, grant unto Captain González-Mejia O Lord
and let perpetual light shine upon him.

May his soul and the souls of all the faithful departed,
through the mercy of God, rest in peace.