Thursday, March 14, 2019

North American T-28B Trojan, N5440F -and- Cessna 152, N48962: Fatal accident occurred March 13, 2019 at Compton-Woodley Airport (KCPM), Los Angeles County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Los Angeles, California 

Upon landing, aircraft struck another aircraft that was on the runway. 

Tomorrow's Aeronautical Museum

https://registry.faa.gov/N5440F

Date: 14-MAR-19
Time: 01:30:00Z
Regis#: N5440F
Aircraft Make: NORTH AMERICAN
Aircraft Model: 28
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: COMPTON
State: CALIFORNIA

Aircraft struck by landing aircraft on the runway. Post crash fire. 

Candace A. Larned Enterprises Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N48962

Date: 14-MAR-19
Time: 01:30:00Z
Regis#: N48962
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: DESTROYED
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: COMPTON
State: CALIFORNIA

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.






Authorities Thursday identified a student pilot who was killed when two planes collided on a runway at Compton/Woodley Airport.

The crash occurred about 7 p.m. March 13 on Runway 25L on March 13, when a North American T-28B Trojan crashed into a Cessna 152 occupied by a flight instructor and a student pilot.

The fatally injured man was identified today by the coroner's office as 40-year-old Lukas Michael Swidinski of Long Beach.

"The Cessna landed first, trailed by the T28," Ian Gregor of the Federal Aviation Administration said in a statement. "The North American T-28B Trojan landed and ran into the Cessna 152, which was still on the runway, causing the Cessna 152 to explode. There were two people on the Cessna 152 and one on the North American T-28B Trojan."

The second man in the Cessna 152 was a flight instructor in his 30s. He was taken to a hospital in critical condition, the sheriff's department said.

The pilot of the North American T-28B Trojan was unhurt, according to the sheriff's department.

Personnel from the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board were working to determine what caused the two planes to collide.

The North American T-28B Trojan is a military trainer first used by the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy in the 1950s, then was utilized as a counter-insurgency aircraft in the Vietnam War.

Anyone who may have witnessed the crash was asked to call the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department's Aero Bureau at (562) 421-2701.


https://www.nbclosangeles.com




A flight instructor remained in critical condition Thursday after a fiery, two-plane crash at the Compton/Woodley Airport killed his student the previous evening.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department described the surviving victim as a man in his 30s and the student as a man in his 40s. They were in a single-engine Cessna 152, which was struck by a single-engine North American T-28 on the runway around 7 p.m. Wednesday.

The pilot of the T-28 did not sustain any injuries in the incident, the Sheriff's Department said. That aircraft, which bears the U.S. Navy sign, appeared to be mostly intact as it sat at the airfield on Thursday morning.

Officials have yet to identify the three individuals involved.

The Cessna had just landed on the runway when the T-28 touched down and ran into it, causing the Cessna to explode, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

"Like many general aviation airports, Compton does not have a control tower," FAA Public Affairs Manager Ian Gregor said. "Pilots communicate with each other on a common radio frequency."

The T-28 appeared to approach the Cessna from behind before landing on top of it, witnesses told KTLA on Wednesday night.

"It just sounded like the darnedest explosion you would imagine… I saw one of the airplanes involved in the crash dragging parts of the other airplane down the runway," pilot Billy Jackson said.

The Compton Fire Department responded to the scene and extinguished the blaze, the L.A. County Sheriff's Department said.

The FAA is helping the National Transportation Safety Board investigate the case.  The NTSB typically takes at least a year to determine what caused an incident, Gregor noted.

A 2015 crash at the county-owned Compton airport left a pilot dead when a single-engine plane that had been trying to tow an advertising banner crashed and burned on a runway, the Associated Press reported.

Story and video ➤ https://ktla.com














COMPTON, California (KABC) -- One person was killed when two small planes collided in a fiery crash at Compton/Woodley Airport Wednesday night. 

The crash was reported just before 7 p.m. It appeared to involve a vintage Vietnam-era T-28 aircraft and a small plane that appears to be a Cessna. 

The small plane was destroyed and burned up in the crash. One pilot was apparently ejected from one of the aircraft and killed. 

Pieces of the aircraft are littering the runway and the wing landed about 100 yards away from the main fuselage. 

Witnesses say it appeared the Cessna had already landed and was taxiing when the other pilot, possibly having trouble with the setting sun, also tried landing on the same runway and crashed into it. 

Firefighters and law enforcement officials were on the scene. 

Paramedics transported another person from the scene in an ambulance. 

The cause remains under investigation.
Story and video ➤https://abc7.com

14 comments:

Anonymous said...

What a horrific accident. That big 3-bladed prop on that powerful radial engine must have tore that Cessna to pieces. At a non-towered airport you have to listen carefully to the CTAF/UNICOM to get a mental picture of where the traffic is but you also have to visually look for the traffic too. If you're not sure where someone is, call out on the radio to clarify. I would think the T-28 was at fault here. Sad story, my condolence to the families of the deceased and RIP to the Cessna pilots.

Anonymous said...

Yes. The T-28 is at fault, he/she (zhe/ze in California ;) did not follow proper protocol.

Anonymous said...

That YouTube video shows one of the witness's photos which appears to be the remains of one of those aboard the Cessna on the runway behind the burning crash remains. Everyone please petition Eyewitness News 7 to edit the video they put on Youtube out of respect of the deceased's loved ones. I really wish I had not seen that and cannot believe the just uploaded those photos unfiltered. Shame on them.

mouser485 said...

If you want to see the actual accident here it is. It’s on Live Leak.

https://www.liveleak.com/view?t=PWfK_1552593846

Geek with Wings said...

Both planes were landing: https://www.reddit.com/r/CatastrophicFailure/comments/b14eh8/aircraft_incident_in_compton_ca_313/?st=JT9P68AR&sh=9f3fb369

Anonymous said...


The "museum pilot" strikes yet again.

Anonymous said...

I just found this video of the entire crash on Youtube and it sickens me that such carelessness caused such carnage. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T8NAfY-IcvA

Unknown said...

Similar accident between a small and large a/c. Large one “doesn’t recall” making a call that he was landing.

http://www.kathrynsreport.com/2018/04/cessna-150-n5614e-and-cessna-525c.html

Anonymous said...

it seems like the sun setting down caused the glare on the T28s and the cessna was not visible to it.

Anonymous said...

Better hope the T28 pilot and museum have good lawyers. They are going to need it.

Anonymous said...

I rather hope that the family of the deceased has a good lawyer!

Anonymous said...

I assure you, the attorneys will find them ..... and they have 364 days to do so

Anonymous said...

There are a few types of accidents that I think about every now and then when flying and this is one scenario. It is so disconcerting to be taking off or landing (or driving for that matter) into the sun. I imagine a deer or another vehicle on the runway... ugh! My heart goes out to the affected individuals and families. I know the Trojan pilot is going to be blamed but goodness, I wouldn't want that guilt on me! One moment you're on top of the world and the next, it all lands on you.

Anonymous said...

You can always go around...