Thursday, March 7, 2019

Cessna 150F, registered to a private individual, ferry flight conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91, N6917F: Accident occurred March 06, 2019 near Bob Sylvester Airpark (2G5), Granite Shoals, Burnet County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N6917F

Location: Granite Shoals, TX
Accident Number: CEN19LA101
Date & Time: 03/06/2019, 1300 CST
Registration: N6917F
Aircraft: Cessna 150
Injuries: 1 Minor, 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Ferry 

On March 6, 2019, about 1300 central standard time, a Cessna 150F, N6917F, registered to a private individual, sustained substantial damage during a loss of engine power after takeoff from the Granite Shoals/Bob Sylvester Airpark (2G5), Granite Shoals, Texas. The private pilot and one child passenger were not injured and another child passenger sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed. The ferry flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. The flight's intended destination was the San Marcus Regional Airport (HYI), San Marcus, Texas.

The pilot reported that the flight's purpose was to reposition the aircraft to HYI to conduct an annual inspection. A local A&P mechanic had provided the pilot documentation for the ferry permit that was issued by the FAA.

The pilot recalls that he last refueled the airplane in October of 2018 with about 8 gallons. Prior to the flight, the pilot conducted a preflight and sumped both wing fuel tanks. The left fuel tank had a little sediment initially, but then became clear. The right fuel tank sump ran clear. After engine start, the left fuel tank gauge indicated near empty, and right fuel tank gauge indicated about 1/4 full. The fuel selector was in the "on" position. In the Cessna 150F airplane, the fuel selector has an "on" and "off" positions. The fuel supply drains from both wing tanks collectively to a "Y" fitting, then to a airframe fuel filter, then to the fuel selector valve, and then to the carburetor and engine.

The pilot stated that he started a right turn after takeoff, and about 600 feet from the ground, the engine sputtered and lost power. The pilot then attempted to turn back to the airport but realized that he was too low. He then executed a forced landing to a field, vegetated with small trees. Upon landing, the left wing struck a small mesquite tree and spun 180-degrees, resulting in structural damage to the left wing. The pilot and two children passengers (6 and 4 years old) exited the airplane. The airplane was not equipped with child safety seating. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N6917F
Model/Series: 150 F
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: AUS, 541 ft msl
Observation Time: 1255 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 55 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 11°C / 4°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 180°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.7 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Granite Shoals, TX (2G5)
Destination: San Marcus, TX (HYI) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  30.589444, -98.370278 (est)



Two men, who were on their way to Llano, survived an emergency landing into an empty lot in Granite Shoals. 

The incident happened about 1:15 Wednesday, March 6 at the intersection of Hilldale and Baker Street, a few blocks from the community's air strip. 

Police reported the Granite Shoals men in the single-engine aircraft said shortly after take off they heard what seemed to be engine problems. 

The men refused treatment at the scene.

Other than the aircraft, there was no damage to nearby property. 

The FAA will conduct an investigation.

Original article ➤ https://www.highlandernews.com




Three passengers in a small aircraft walked away from a crash landing in Granite Shoals on March 5.

The three Granite Shoals residents were flying in a 1966 Cessna 150 aircraft on their way to Llano from the Bob Sylvester Airpark in Granite Shoals.

A witness contacted the Granite Shoals Police Department between about 12:30 p.m. and 12:40 p.m. to say a plane had grazed treetops on the corner of Barker and Hilldale drives. It spun then came to a stop in the brush and cactuses at the corner of the two streets.

Police officers were on the scene throughout the afternoon.

“They had trouble with the plane and were over (Lake LBJ) and circled back to land and just landed in a field,” City Manager Jeff Looney said.

Police Chief Gary Boshears said this is only the second such crash in Granite Shoals in 13 years.

“The pilot turned back around when he started having mechanical issues and put it down here,” he said.

Passengers were “shaken up but in good spirits,” Boshears said. “They were thanking the Lord everybody was OK.”

Because it is under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration, city officials declined to release the names of the passengers.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.dailytrib.com

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

3 souls onboard a Cessna 150? Either a case of typo and it was a 172 or reckless and careless operation of an aircraft and thrown the book at them!

Chris Kilgus said...

3 people in a Cessna 150!

Anonymous said...

Three Occupants? That's a two place aircraft!! And only if the two occupants are lightweight!.