Sunday, February 24, 2019

Golden Circle Air T-Bird II Tierra, N204BC: Accident occurred July 31, 2017 near Washington County Airport (8WC), Potosi, Missouri

A Missouri State Highway Patrol trooper interviews an eyewitness to the crash of an experimental amateur-built aircraft that occurred July 31st, 2017 in a field not far from Washington County Airport. 


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Saint Louis, Missouri

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N204BC


Location: Potosi, MO
Accident Number: CEN17LA293
Date & Time: 07/31/2017, 0835 CDT
Registration: N204BC
Aircraft: CHAPMAN T-BIRD II
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 31, 2017, at 0835 central daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Chapman T-Bird II, N204BC, collided with the terrain shortly after takeoff from the Washington County Airport (8WC), Potosi, Missouri. The private rated pilot was seriously injured and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual flight rules conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the accident, and a flight plan had not been filed. The local flight was departing at the time of the accident.

Two witnesses reported seeing the airplane in a "nose dive" shortly after takeoff. One of these witnesses stated the airplane was having "difficulty" and heard the engine prior to the descent. A third witness was a friend of the owner and identified himself as "part owner" of the airplane. He reported the takeoff and initial climb looked normal. The airplane then entered what looked like a right crosswind turn, which was the normal procedure after takeoff on runway 02. He stated the wing "dropped" in the turn and the airplane continued a descending turn until it disappeared behind the terrain. This witness had flown the airplane in the past and stated that the airplane tended to "drop a wing" in turns which required a quick recovery. He also stated the airplane was a little "squirrelly" because it reacted quickly to control inputs.

The accident pilot, who was not the owner, had not flown this airplane before the accident flight. The part owner stated they looked over the airplane and discussed the handling characteristics of the airplane, including the need to keep the airspeed above 50 mph and the engine above 6,000 rpm. The part owner stated that due to the pilot's size and the small cockpit, he had a difficult time getting in the airplane, so he adjusted the rudder pedals forward. He stated the control yoke was contacting the pilot's leg when he turned it to the left.

The part owner stated that he made several modifications to the airplane at the registered owner's request. The modifications included changing the landing gear from a conventional to tricycle gear, installing different brakes, installing a different shaped fuel tank, changing and raising the seats, modifying the steering assembly and most recently changing the flaperons to a flap and aileron design. The airplane had been flown three times between the time the flight control design change was completed and the accident flight. The registered owner flew it twice and the part owner flew it once when he inadvertently became airborne during high speed taxi tests.

The part owner stated they did not conduct any flight tests or aerodynamic performance calculations after the modification. He did not hold, nor was he required to have a repairman certificate for this make airplane. The last condition inspection recorded in the aircraft logbook was dated February 15, 2017. There were no entries in the logbook stating the airplane met the flight test requirements following a major modification as outlined in the Experimental Operating Limitations for the airplane.

The Operating Limitations for the airplane state, in part, "…after incorporating a major change as described in 21.93, the owner is required to re-establish compliance… ." "…the owner shall make a detailed log book entry describing the change prior to the test flight… ." A review of the aircraft logbook did not reveal any such entries. Additionally, the part owner stated that he didn't feel the changes to the airplane were a major modification, because they made the airplane better than the original design.


Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 70, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: None
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:


Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CHAPMAN
Registration: N204BC
Model/Series: T-BIRD II
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2002
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 10119
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/15/2017, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: 582
Registered Owner: ISAACSON ARTHUR T
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: FAM, 945 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 20 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1356 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 125°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 80°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.19 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 17°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Potosi, MO (8WC)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Potosi, MO (8WC)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport:  Washington County Airport (8WC)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 959 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 02
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4000 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  37.928611, -90.731667 (est)


NTSB Identification: CEN17LA293

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 31, 2017 in Potosi, MO
Aircraft: CHAPMAN T-BIRD II, registration: N204BC
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 31, 2017, at 0835 central daylight time, an amateur built Chapman T-Bird II, N204BC, collided with the terrain shortly after takeoff from the Washington County Airport (8WC), Potosi, Missouri. The private pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual flight rules conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the accident, and a flight plan had not been filed. The local flight was departing at the time of the accident.

A witness reported the takeoff and initial climb looked normal. The airplane then entered what looked like a right crosswind turn, which was the normal procedure after takeoff on runway 02. He stated the wing "dropped" in the turn and the airplane continued a descending turn until it disappeared behind the terrain. The witness, who had flown the accident airplane, stated that the airplane had a tendency to "drop a wing" in turns and that you had to be quick to recover.

No comments: