Sunday, February 24, 2019

Cessna R182 Skylane RG, N9155C: Accident occurred August 19, 2017 at Clearwater Air Park (KCLW), Pinellas County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N9155C

Location: Clearwater, FL
Accident Number: ERA17LA287
Date & Time: 08/19/2017, 1310 EDT
Registration: N9155C
Aircraft: CESSNA R182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear collapse
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 19, 2017, about 1310 eastern daylight time, a Cessna R182, N9155C, was substantially damaged during landing at Clearwater Air Park (CLW), Clearwater, Florida. The private pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Tampa Executive Airport (VDF), Tampa, Florida, about 1200.

According to the pilot, he performed a preflight inspection an did not note any anomalies with the airplane, nor did he notice any hydraulic leaks near the landing gear system. After takeoff, he moved the landing gear selector to the UP position and noted that the yellow landing gear up indicator illuminated. While on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, he attempted to extend the landing gear, and while he heard the landing gear motor operating, he saw that the landing gear were hanging under the airplane and were not locked. He then departed the traffic pattern and flew over the Gulf of Mexico to assess the situation. He performed the landing gear malfunction procedures listed in the pilot operating handbook; however, the landing gear would not lock. Next, he performed several maneuvers to get the landing gear to lock in the down position but was unsuccessful.

Overall, the pilot attempted to extend the landing gear for about an hour until he then maneuvered the airplane toward the airport and asked the local tower controller to look and see if the landing gear was down. The local controller could not verify that it was locked in the down position. The pilot elected to perform a gear up landing and advised the tower controller. Before contacting the runway, the pilot leaned the fuel mixture and the engine stopped producing power. After landing, the pilot determined that the nose landing gear was down and locked, therefore, he tried to maintain directional control of the airplane. After the airplane came to rest on the runway, he turned off the ignition, master switch, and pulled the fuel shutoff valve. He then egressed the airplane without injury.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector who responded to the accident site stated that the left horizontal stabilizer was substantially damaged. An examination of the hydraulic system revealed that there was no hydraulic fluid in the reservoir.

The airplane was placed on jacks and serviced with hydraulic fluid. The landing gear lever was moved in the cockpit to retract the landing gear, however the landing gear did not move. The FAA inspector noted that hydraulic fluid was leaking from the forward underside section of the fuselage. Further examination revealed that the hydraulic fluid was leaking from the landing gear down return line. The rubber hose was removed, and a leak was noted at the sleeve of the hydraulic line.

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1978. It was equipped with a Lycoming O-540-J3C5D, a 235-hp, engine. According to the airframe maintenance logbook, the most recent annual inspection was performed on September 1, 2016, at a total time of 6150.9 hours. Examination of the maintenance logbooks by FAA inspectors revealed that there was no entry in the airframe log about a replacement or any maintenance performed on the landing gear down return line.

According to the pilot operating handbook, "to retract or extend the landing gear, pull out on the gear lever and move it to the desired position. After the lever is positioned, the power pack will create pressure in the system and actuate the landing gear to the selected position. During normal cycle, the gear retracts fully or extends and locks, limit switches close, and the indicator light comes on (amber for up and green for down) indicating completion of the cycle. After indicator light illumination, the power pack will continue to run until the fluid pressure reaches 1500 PSI, opens the pressure switch, and turns the power pack off. Whenever fluid pressure in the system drops below 1000 PSI, the
pressure switch will close and start power pack operation, except when the
nose gear safety (squat) switch is open."

According the manufacturer's service manual, the landing gear hydraulic system was to be checked for leaks and external damage to components or mounting structure every 100 hours. In addition, an overhaul of the landing gear system selector valve, emergency hand pump, and pressure switch was to take place every 5 years. Furthermore, all the rubber parts of the landing gear system, including the rubber landing gear down return line, were to be replaced every 5 years.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 49, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/01/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/24/2016
Flight Time:  913 hours (Total, all aircraft), 337 hours (Total, this make and model), 876 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N9155C
Model/Series: R182 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: R18200427
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/01/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 44 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6196.1 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-540
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 235 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PIE, 11 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1253 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 136°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 5500 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 40°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 23°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: TAMPA, FL (VDF)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Clearwater, FL (CLW)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1200 EDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: CLEARWATER AIR PARK (CLW)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 71 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 34
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4108 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:   27.976667, -82.758889 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA287
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 19, 2017 in Clearwater, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA R182, registration: N9155C
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 19, 2017, about 1310 eastern daylight time, a Cessna R182, N9155C, was substantially damaged during landing at Clearwater Air Park (CLW), Clearwater, Florida. The private pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Tampa Executive Airport (VDR), Tampa, Florida, about 1200.

According to the pilot, while on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, the landing gear did not extend and lock. He then departed the traffic pattern and flew over the Gulf of Mexico to assess the situation. He performed the landing gear malfunction procedures listed in the pilot operating handbook; however, the landing gear would not lock. Next, he performed several maneuvers to get the landing gear to lock in the down position but was unsuccessful. He then maneuvered the airplane toward the airport and asked the local tower controller to look and see if the landing gear was down; however, the local controller could not verify that it was locked in the down position. The pilot elected to perform a gear up landing and advised the tower controller. Before contacting the runway, the pilot leaned the fuel mixture and the engine stopped producing power. After landing, the pilot determined that the nose landing gear was down and locked, therefore, he tried to maintain directional control of the airplane. After the airplane came to rest on the runway, he turned off the ignition, master switch, and pulled the fuel shutoff valve. He then egressed the airplane without injury.

A Federal Aviation Administration inspector who responded to the accident site stated that the left horizontal stabilizer was substantially damaged. An examination of the hydraulic system revealed that there was no hydraulic fluid in the reservoir.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

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