Saturday, May 19, 2018

Beechcraft B200T Super King Air, N60RA, registered to a private corporation and operated by Eastern Air Express: Accident occurred January 27, 2017 at Palm Beach International Airport (KPBI), West Palm Beach, Palm Beach County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N60RA



Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: West Palm Beach, FL
Accident Number: ERA17LA096
Date & Time: 01/27/2017, 1750 EST
Registration: N60RA
Aircraft: BEECH 200
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear not configured
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Positioning 

On January 27, 2017, at 1750 eastern standard time, a Beech 200T, N60RA, was substantially damaged during landing at Palm Beach International Airport (PBI), West Palm Beach, Florida. The airline transport pilot and a commercial-rated copilot were not injured. The airplane was registered to a private corporation and operated by Eastern Air Express under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a positioning flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight originated at Treasure Cay, Bahamas (MYAT) at 1652.

The pilot reported that the preflight and enroute portions of the flight were uneventful. The flight was established on the localizer for the approach to runway 28R, which was dry. Flaps were set to the approach position and the landing gear were extended and showed "3 green." After touchdown, he heard noises, and the airplane started to sink. After the airplane came to a stop on the right side of the runway, the pilots noticed that the gear handle was up. The pilot stated, "How did the gear handle get up?" He then placed the handle to the down position. The pilots secured the airplane and were met by first responders.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the airplane. Structural damage to the fuselage was confirmed. All three landing gear were found in a partially extended position. Skid marks from all three tires were observed on the runway, leading up the main wreckage. Both propeller assemblies were damaged due to contact with the runway. The pressure vessel was compromised from contact with a propeller blade. The nose landing gear actuator was forced up, into the nose gear well and penetrated the upper nose skin. Examination of the landing gear components did not reveal evidence of a preexisting mechanical malfunction or malfunction.

A 28-volt split-field motor, located on the forward side of the center-section main spar, extended and retracted the landing gear. The landing gear motor was controlled by a switch placarded "LDG GEAR CONT – UP – DN" on the pilot's right subpanel. The switch handle had to be pulled out of a detent before it could be moved from either the up or the down position.

The pilot reported in a written statement that he went to bed around 2245 local on the evening prior to the accident and woke up around 0500 local. He also reported that he "was up several times" during the night to go to the bathroom. On the day of the accident, he flew 7 legs for a total of 5.2 hours. The only food he consumed that day was a banana for breakfast. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 47, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/04/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/09/2016
Flight Time:  14414 hours (Total, all aircraft), 631 hours (Total, this make and model), 11454 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 166 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 53 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification:
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 1560 hours (Total, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BEECH
Registration: N60RA
Model/Series: 200 T
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1979
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: BT-7
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 9
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/10/2016, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 12500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 44 Hours
Engines: 2 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 15782 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt and Whitney Canada
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-41
Registered Owner: RIDGEAIRE INC
Rated Power: 850 hp
Operator: Eastern Air Express
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: 1EAA

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PBI, 19 ft msl
Observation Time: 1753 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3600 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 13°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 25000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots, 350°
Visibility (RVR):  
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Treasure Cay, FN (MYAT)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: West Palm Beach, FL (PBI)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1652 EST
Type of Airspace: Class C

Airport Information

Airport: Palm Beach Int. (PBI)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 19 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 28R
IFR Approach: Localizer Only
Runway Length/Width: 10001 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 26.683056, -80.095556 (est) 



NTSB Identification: ERA17LA096 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, January 27, 2017 in West Palm Beach, FL
Aircraft: BEECH 200, registration: N60RA
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 27, 2017, at 1750 eastern standard time, a Beech 200T, N60RA, was substantially damaged during landing at Palm Beach International Airport (PBI), West Palm Beach, Florida. The airline transport pilot and a commercial-rated copilot were not injured. The airplane was registered to a private corporation and operated by Eastern Air Express under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a positioning flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight originated at Treasure Cay, Bahamas (MYAT) at 1652.

The pilots reported that the preflight and en route portions of the flight were uneventful. The flight was established on the localizer for the approach to runway 28R, which was dry. Flaps were set to the approach position and the landing gear were extended and showed "3 green." After touchdown, they heard noises, and the airplane started to sink. After the airplane came to a stop on the right side of the runway, the pilots noticed that the gear handle was up. The pilot stated, "How did the gear handle get up?" He then placed the handle to the down position. The pilots secured the airplane and were met by first responders.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the airplane. Structural damage to the fuselage was confirmed. Both propeller assemblies were damaged due to contact with the runway.  The airplane was retained for further examination.

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