Friday, April 27, 2018

Oberg Murphy Rebel, N734R: Accident occurred October 12, 2017 in Fort Collins, Larimer County, Colorado

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N734R


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Fort Collins, CO
Accident Number: CEN18LA013
Date & Time: 10/12/2017, 1040 MDT
Registration: N734R
Aircraft: RUSSELL E OBERG MURPHY REBEL
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel related
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 12, 2017, about 1040 mountain daylight time, an amateur-built Murphy Rebel airplane, N734R, was substantially damaged during the forced landing to a field near Fort Collins, Colorado. The pilot, the sole occupant on board, sustained minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight that departed Vance Brand Airport (KLMO), Longmont, Colorado, about 1000.

According to a statement from the pilot, while en route at an altitude of 9,000 feet the engine started "sputtering" and lost power. He attempted to restore power by switching fuel tanks and adjusting the throttle but was unsuccessful. During the forced landing to a field the airplane nosed over resulting in substantial damage to the fuselage and vertical stabilizer.

The pilot stated that he did not use carburetor heat following the loss of engine power. He stated that he misunderstood the conditions which carburetor ice could form, believing it to be in visible moisture and clouds, like structural wing icing. He further stated that carburetor heat was only for instrument conditions.

The National Transportation Safety Board Investigator in Charge examined the airplane following the recovery to a secure facility. The examination of the airplane, including the engine and fuel system, revealed no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The closest routine aviation weather report, taken at 1156, recorded a temperature of 52°F and a dewpoint temperature of 39°F. A review of the carburetor icing probability chart, located in the Federal Aviation Administration's Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin CE-09-35, dated June 30, 2009, revealed that the airplane was operating in an area favorable for the formation of serious carburetor icing at any power setting. In addition, weather computer model soundings taken around the time of the accident supported a favorable environment for carburetor icing at the operational altitude of the flight. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 70, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/20/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/30/2017
Flight Time:  341.1 hours (Total, all aircraft), 18.1 hours (Total, this make and model), 226.2 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft) 



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: RUSSELL E OBERG
Registration: N734R
Model/Series: MURPHY REBEL
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2015
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 734R
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/20/2017, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1700 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 18.1 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320-E2D
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFNL
Observation Time: 1056 MDT
Distance from Accident Site:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 11°C / 4°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots, 120°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Longmont, CO (KLMO)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Longmont, CO (KLMO)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1000 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class E 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  40.640000, -105.130000 (est)




NTSB Identification: CEN18LA013
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 12, 2017 in Fort Collins, CO
Aircraft: RUSSELL E OBERG MURPHY REBEL, registration: N734R
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 12, 2017, about 1058 mountain daylight time, an amateur-built Oberg Murphy Rebel airplane, N734R, was substantially damaged during the forced landing to a field near Fort Collins, Colorado. The pilot, the sole occupant on board, sustained minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight.

According to a statement from the pilot, while en route the engine started "sputtering" and lost power. He attempted to restore power by switching fuel tanks but was unsuccessful. During the forced landing to a field the airplane nosed over resulting in substantial damage to the fuselage and vertical stabilizer.

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