Thursday, March 29, 2018

Cessna 182K Skylane, N2861R: Accident occurred February 28, 2016 near Gainesville Regional Airport (KGNV), Alachua County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Continental Motors, Inc.; Mobile, Alabama
Cessna Aircraft; Wichita, Kansas 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N2861R



National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Factual Report

Location: Gainesville, FL
Accident Number: ERA16LA114
Date & Time: 02/28/2016, 1200 EST
Registration: N2861R
Aircraft: CESSNA 182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Collision during takeoff/land
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On February 28, 2016, about 1200 eastern standard time, a Cessna 182K, N2816R, experienced a total loss of engine power and performed a forced landing to a road near Gainesville, Florida. The commercial pilot and passenger incurred minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport (FXE), Fort Lauderdale, Florida, around 1000. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot. The personal cross-country flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 and had an intended destination of Gainesville Regional Airport (GNV), Gainesville, Florida.

According to the pilot, he performed a preflight inspection, added 1 quart of oil to the engine, which totaled 8 quarts of oil, and then performed an engine run up with no anomalies noted. The takeoff, climb, and beginning of the descent phase of flight were "uneventful." The pilot was cleared to land on runway 7 when the engine began to run "rough." He unsuccessfully attempted to alleviate the rough engine noise by enriching the mixture and then reducing the power. The engine began shaking, oil sprayed onto the windscreen of the airplane, and then the engine experienced a total loss of power. The pilot declared an emergency, and elected to land on a road. After touching down on the paved surface, the left wing of the airplane impacted a palm tree and the airplane stopped on the road.

A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the wings and fuselage were substantially damaged. In addition, the engine cowling was removed to facilitate an engine examination, and a hole was noted in the top of the crankcase in the vicinity of the No. 4 cylinder. In addition, the No. 4 cylinder connecting rod was located on the top of the engine. The engine was retained for further examination.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the airplane was manufactured in 1967, and registered to the pilot/owner in 2014. It was equipped with a Continental Motors IO-550 D series, 300-hp engine, which was installed in February 2000 in accordance with a supplemental type certificate. According to the pilot, the engine had accumulated 2,135 total hours of time in service since the time of rebuild in 1999, and had approximately 130 flight hours since the most recent annual inspection, which was completed on November 3, 2015. The most recent oil change occurred approximately 32 flight hours prior to the accident. Engine manufacturer guidance recommended that the time-based overhaul of the engine occur at 1,700 flight hours or every 12 years.

The engine was examined at the manufacturer's facility under NTSB oversight. Examination of the cylinders revealed normal operating signatures and combustion deposits. The intake and exhaust valve faces and seats exhibited full seat contact signatures, and the intake and exhaust valve guides exhibited normal wear and operating signatures. The intake and exhaust rocker arms and shafts also exhibited normal operating signatures. All piston heads exhibited normal combustion deposits. The Nos. 4 and 5 pistons exhibited impact damage and the No. 4 piston was fractured.

Disassembly of the engine revealed the Nos. 4 and 5 connecting rods had separated from the crankshaft at their respective journals. The Nos. 4 and 5 journals exhibited discoloration and heat damage, consistent with oil starvation. The oil galleys and passages in the crankshaft were clear and unrestricted.

The engine oil sump was removed from the engine and the forward section exhibited impact damage. In addition, an unmeasured amount of oil and metal particles were noted inside the oil sump. The oil filter remained attached to the engine and was removed. It was disassembled and metal particles were noted in the filter.

The crankcase exhibited exterior damage concentrated at the No. 4 cylinder. Cylinder bays Nos. 4 and 5 were mechanically damaged, with portions of the crankcase missing above the No. 4 cylinder. The main bearing support mating surfaces were intact, exhibited no signs of fretting, and exhibited no signs of bearing movement or rotation. The oil galleys and passages in the left and right crankcase halves were intact, clear, and unrestricted.

The airplane was equipped with a JPI engine data monitor that was capable of recording engine performance data. The engine data monitor was removed and successfully downloaded at the NTSB's Vehicle Recorder Division in Washington, D.C. The data parameters that were recorded for the accident flight included, fuel flow, exhaust gas temperature, cylinder head temperature, oil temperature, fuel used, battery voltage, and outside air temperature.

According to the data, the flight was uneventful until about 1156, when the oil temperature began a steady increase. In the 4 minutes that followed, oil temperature continued to rise and peaked at 202 degrees F prior to the end of the data. According to the engine instruments in the cockpit, the DO NOT EXCEED oil temperature was 225 degrees F. Below 225 degrees F was the normal oil temperature operating range. 



Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Foreign; Private
Age: 61, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/01/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/06/2015
Flight Time: 1900 hours (Total, all aircraft), 800 hours (Total, this make and model), 1500 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 130 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 40 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N2861R
Model/Series: 182 K
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1967
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18258461
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/03/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2348 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 130 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2139 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT:  Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-550 Series
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 300 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGNV, 123 ft msl
Observation Time: 1153 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 148°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / -2°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.29 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: FORT LAUDERDALE, FL (FXE)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Gainesville, FL (GNV)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1000 EST
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: GAINESVILLE RGNL (GNV)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 151 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  29.698056, -82.280278 (est)





















NTSB Identification: ERA16LA114 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, February 28, 2016 in Gainesville, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N2861R
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 28, 2016, about 1200 eastern standard time, a Cessna 182K, N2816R, experienced a total loss of engine power and performed a forced landing to a road near Gainesville, Florida. The commercial pilot and passenger incurred minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport (FXE), Fort Lauderdale, Florida, around 1000. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot. The cross country flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 and had an intended destination of Gainesville Regional Airport (GNV), Gainesville, Florida.

According to the pilot, he performed a preflight inspection and engine run up with no anomalies noted. The takeoff, climb, and beginning of the descent phase of flight were "uneventful." The pilot was cleared to land on runway 7 when the engine began to run "rough." He unsuccessfully attempted to alleviate the rough engine noise by enriching the mixture and then reducing the power. The engine began shaking, oil sprayed onto the windshield of the airplane, and then the engine lost total power. The pilot declared an emergency, and elected to land on a road. After touching down on the paved surface, the left wing of the airplane impacted a palm tree and the airplane came to rest on the road.

A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the wings and fuselage were substantially damaged. In addition, the engine cowling was removed to facilitate an engine examination, and a hole was noted in the top of the crankcase in the vicinity of the No. 4 cylinder. In addition, the No. 4 cylinder connecting rod was located on the top of the engine. The engine was retained for further examination.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the airplane was manufactured in 1967, and registered to the pilot/owner in 2014. In addition, the airplane was equipped with a Continental Motors IO-550 D series, 300 hp engine. According to the pilot, the engine had accumulated 2,135 total hours of time, and had approximately 130 hours since the most recent annual inspection, which was signed off on November 3, 2015.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

wrapping the tail number after an accident is always shady buisness

Anonymous said...

^ Agree with your sentiments. Suspicious behavior, activity, etc...

Anonymous said...

If you haven't already, take a look at N915TD Cirrus SR22 NTSB accident docket. All photographs of Cirrus SR22 with wrapped tail number.

I was told even though the logbook reflects the damage history, pictures on the internet of the crash scene with accident plane can possibly make a future sale difficult. Not sure of the validity and soundness of the statement.

Fly safe ...
Train often

Anonymous said...

N915TD photos edited to just to where the tail number begins and then there's the wrap. For added measure cover the tail number and only take photos without tail number, even though it's covered. Hmmmmm