Thursday, March 29, 2018

Beech C23 Sundowner, N6576R: Accident occurred August 21, 2017 near Rexburg–Madison County Airport (KRXE), Idaho

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Wasatch Meadows Flyers LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6576R



National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Factual Report

Location: Rexburg, ID
Accident Number: GAA17CA500
Date & Time: 08/21/2017, 1450 MDT
Registration: N6576R
Aircraft: BEECH C23
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing area overshoot
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis 

According to the pilot, during the takeoff roll, about 2,100 ft down the 4,210-ft-long runway, the airplane had accelerated to 65 knots. The airplane remained in ground effect for about 1,000 more feet but would not climb. The pilot feared the airplane would collide with obstacles beyond the end of the runway, and he aborted the takeoff.

During landing, the airplane bounced, and when it descended back to the runway, the pilot immediately applied the brakes. The airplane exited the left side of the runway before reaching the runway threshold. The airplane continued about 120 ft and then collided with a fence.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings and the lower left fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The METAR at the accident airport reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 200° at 8 knots, and the temperature was 73°F. The field elevation was 4,862 ft, and the density altitude was 6,682 ft.

According to the Pilot's Operating Handbook, under the reported weather conditions, the minimum ground roll was about 2,249 ft, and the minimum distance to clear a 50-ft obstacle was about 3,701 ft. Further, the normal distance to land would have been about 901 ft.

According to FAA-H-8083-25A, The Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, Chapter 10 (Aircraft Performance) pg.16:

The most critical conditions of landing performance are combinations of high gross weight, high density altitude, and unfavorable wind. These conditions produce the greatest required landing distances and critical levels of energy dissipation required of the brakes. In all cases, it is necessary to make an accurate prediction of minimum landing distance to compare with the available runway. A polished, professional landing procedure is necessary because the landing phase of flight accounts for more pilot-caused aircraft accidents than any other single phase of flight.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's delayed decision to land the airplane with insufficient runway remaining after realizing the airplane wasn't climbing. 

Findings

Aircraft
Landing distance - Capability exceeded (Cause)

Personnel issues
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Fence/fence post - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information

History of Flight

Takeoff
Miscellaneous/other

Takeoff-rejected takeoff
Loss of control on ground
Runway excursion (Defining event)
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

According to the pilot, during the takeoff roll on runway 17, about 2,100ft down the 4,210 ft runway, the airplane had accelerated to 65kts. The airplane remained in ground effect for about 1,000 additional feet but would not climb. The pilot feared the airplane would collide with obstacles beyond the end of the runway, and he aborted the takeoff.

During landing, the airplane bounced and when it descended back to the runway, the pilot immediately applied the brakes. The airplane exited the left side of the runway, before the runway threshold. The airplane continued about 120ft and then collided with a chain link fence.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings and the lower left fuselage.

The pilot reported that the departure weight of the airplane was 2,395.5lbs. According to the manufacturer, the maximum takeoff weight for the airplane was 2,450lbs.

The METAR at the accident airport reported that about the time of the accident, the wind was from 200° at 8kts and the temperature was 73°F. The field elevation was 4,862ft and the density altitude was 6,682ft.

According to the manufacturer's pilot operating handbook (POH), under the reported weather conditions, the minimum ground roll was about 2,249ft, and the minimum distance to clear a 50ft obstacle was about 3,701ft.

Further, the normal distance to land would have been about 901ft.

According to FAA-H-8083-25A, The Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, Chapter 10 (Aircraft Performance) pg.16: The most critical conditions of landing performance are combinations of high gross weight, high density altitude, and unfavorable wind. These conditions produce the greatest required landing distances and critical levels of energy dissipation required of the brakes. In all cases, it is necessary to make an accurate prediction of minimum landing distance to compare with the available runway. A polished, professional landing procedure is necessary because the landing phase of flight accounts for more pilot-caused aircraft accidents than any other single phase of flight.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 24, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: None
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/30/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/13/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 92.3 hours (Total, all aircraft), 24.4 hours (Total, this make and model), 43.8 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 18.1 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3.6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BEECH
Registration: N6576R
Model/Series: C23 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1974
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: M-1594
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/18/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:  2450 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2824 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91  installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A4T
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None




Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRXE, 4858 ft msl
Observation Time: 1953 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 81°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 3°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:  8 knots, 200°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.21 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Rexburg, ID (RXE)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: SALT LAKE CITY, UT (U42)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1445 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: REXBURG-MADISON COUNTY (RXE)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 4862 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 17
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4204 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 43.833889, -111.805000 (est)

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