Monday, April 3, 2017

Cessna 182D Skylane, Livestock Innovations Inc., N8889X: Accident occurred April 02, 2017 near Blue Earth Municipal Airport (KSBU), Faribault County, Minnesota



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Livestock Innovations Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N8889X

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA215 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 02, 2017 in Blue Earth, MN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/20/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N8889X
Injuries: 2 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, while approaching the destination airport in night, marginal visual meteorological conditions, he turned on the pilot-controlled runway lights. He added that he began a descent to the runway without observing the runway lights or airport and encountered “ground fog” about 200 to 300 ft above ground level (agl). He further added that he continued the descent to the runway while referencing the navigational moving map and GPS altitude on his electronic flight bag (EFB) application ForeFlight. Subsequently, while in a left turn, the airplane impacted terrain about 1 nautical mile south of the runway. 

The left wing, firewall, and fuselage sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. He added that, while en route, he reset his airplane-installed barometric pressure altimeter to the GPS altitude indicated on his EFB, which resulted in a “300 ft. error.” 

An automated weather observing station, about 14 nautical miles west of the accident airport, recorded visibility at 2 1/2 statute miles, light rain, mist, and an overcast cloud ceiling at 300 ft agl.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's decision to continue the night, visual flight into instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in controlled flight into terrain while on final approach. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's improper use of an electronic flight bag.

The pilot reported that while approaching the destination airport, in night marginal visual meteorological conditions, he turned on the pilot controlled runway lights. He added that he began a descent to the runway, without observing the runway lights or airport, and encountered "ground fog" about 200 to 300 ft. above the ground. He further added that he continued the descent to the runway while referencing the navigational moving map and GPS altitude on his electronic flight bag (EFB) application ForeFlight. Subsequently, while in a left turn, the airplane impacted terrain about one nautical mile south of the runway. 

The left wing, firewall, and fuselage sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. He added that while enroute, he reset his airplane installed barometric pressure altimeter to the GPS altitude indicated on his EFB, which resulted in a "300 ft. error." 

An automated weather observing station, about 14 nautical miles west of the accident airport, recorded visibility at 2 ½ statute miles, light rain, mist, and an overcast cloud ceiling at 300 ft. above ground.



NTSB Identification: GAA17CA215 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 02, 2017 in Blue Earth, MN
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N8889X
Injuries: 2 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that while approaching the destination airport, in night marginal visual meteorological conditions, he turned on the pilot controlled runway lights. He added that he began a descent to the runway, without observing the runway lights or airport, and encountered "ground fog" about 200 to 300 ft. above the ground. He further added that he continued the descent to the runway while referencing the navigational moving map and GPS altitude on his electronic flight bag (EFB) application ForeFlight. Subsequently, while in a left turn, the airplane impacted terrain about one nautical mile south of the runway.

The left wing, firewall, and fuselage sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. He added that while enroute, he reset his airplane installed barometric pressure altimeter to the GPS altitude indicated on his EFB, which resulted in a "300 ft. error." 

An automated weather observing station, about 14 nautical miles west of the accident airport, recorded visibility at 2 ½ statute miles, light rain, mist, and an overcast cloud ceiling at 300 ft. above ground.
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A Cessna 182D Skylane force landed near the city of Blue Earth.

According to the Faribault County Sheriff’s Office, police responded just before 10:30 last night to a plane that had force landed in a field south of Blue Earth near the Blue Earth airport.

The pilot, 67-year-old Robin Hermanson of South Dakota, along with two passengers were treated and released at the scene.

The scene is being secured by the Faribault County Sheriff’s Office until the FAA completes its investigation. 

Story and video:   http://www.keyc.com

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash of a small plane about four miles south of Blue Earth.

According to the Fairbault County Sheriff’s Office, the plane crashed into a field near the Blue Earth airport around 10:20 Sunday night.

The pilot and two passengers were all treated at the scene by the responding ambulance crew.

They’ve been identified as 67-year-old Robin Hermanson of Garretson, South Dakota, along with 56-year-old Tim Lippert of Easton and his 13-year-old son.

The scene is being secured by the Faribault County Sheriff’s Office until the FAA completes its investigation of the crash.

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