Friday, December 22, 2017

Piper PA-28-140, N499TG: Accident occurred October 01, 2016 at Hesler-Noble Field (KLUL), Laurel , Jones County, Mississippi

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Jackson, Mississippi

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N499TG

Location: Laurel, MS
Accident Number: ERA17LA005
Date & Time: 10/01/2016, 1020 CDT
Registration: N499TG
Aircraft: PIPER PA28
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis 

The student pilot departed with full fuel tanks and flew to a nearby airport to practice takeoffs and landings. In preparation for his first landing, he checked that the mixture was full-rich and that the electric fuel pump and carburetor heat were turned on. The student pilot reduced power and extended the flaps; however, he realized that the airplane was too high and chose to go around. The student pilot applied full power, retracted the flaps, and turned off the carburetor heat. At that point, the engine started running roughly and experienced a total loss of power. The student pilot turned the carburetor heat back on, rechecked that the electric fuel pump was still on, and switched fuel tanks, but engine power was not restored. The student pilot made a forced landing to a field adjacent to the airport.

Examination of the airplane revealed the carburetor had flooded and was leaking due to a stuck float, which prevented engine operation. The carburetor was removed and disassembled. No anomalies were noted with the float or needle/seat, and the carburetor was reassembled and reinstalled on the engine. The engine was subsequently started, and it ran with no anomalies noted. The reason for the stuck carburetor float could not be determined. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
A total loss of engine power due to a stuck carburetor float. The reason the carburetor float became stuck could not be determined because postaccident examination of the float and needle/seat revealed no anomalies. 

Findings

Aircraft
Fuel control/carburetor - Malfunction (Cause)

Not determined
Not determined - Unknown/Not determined (Cause)


Factual Information

On October 1, 2016, about 1020 central daylight time, a Piper PA28-140, N499TG, was substantially damaged during a forced landing after a total loss of engine power while executing a go-around at the Hesler-Noble Airport (LUL), Laurel, Mississippi. The student pilot, who also the registered owner/operator of the airplane was not injured. No flight plan was filed for the flight that originated at the Hattiesburg-Laurel Regional Airport (PIB), Hattiesburg-Laurel, Mississippi, about 1000. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The student pilot stated that he departed with full fuel and flew to LUL to practice takeoffs and landings. Before attempting the first landing, he checked that the mixture was full-rich, and the electric fuel pump and carburetor heat were turned on. The student pilot reduced power and extended the flaps; however, he realized the airplane was too high and elected to go-around. The student pilot applied full power, retracted the flaps and turned off the carburetor heat. At that point, the engine started running rough and experienced a total loss of power. The student pilot turned the carburetor heat back on, re-checked that the electric fuel pump was still on, and switched fuel tanks, but engine power was not restored. The student pilot made a forced landing to a field adjacent to the airport. During the landing roll, the left main landing gear entered a large hole resulting in substantial damage to the left wing and an engine mount. The left main landing gear and nose-wheel were also damaged.

Postaccident accident examination of the airplane revealed sufficient fuel in each wing tank. Fuel samples taken from each wing and gascolator were absent of water and debris. An attempt was made to start the engine on the airframe utilizing the airplane's own fuel system; however, when the fuel boost pump was turned on to start the engine, it was not registering any pressure and an odor of fuel was noted. Further examination revealed the carburetor had flooded and was leaking due to a stuck float. The carburetor was removed and disassembled. No anomalies were noted with the needle and seat and there were no signs of the float rubbing or binding. The carburetor was reassembled and reinstalled on the engine. When the fuel boost pump was turned back on, it registered a pressure of 7 psi. The engine was then started and ran to a maximum 1,800 rpm due to the broken engine mount. The magnetos and carburetor heat were tested and no anomalies were noted.

The student pilot reported a total of 90 hours, of which, 60 hours were in the Piper PA-28-140. His last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical was issued on September 30, 2016.

The student pilot also reported that the engine was manufactured in 1978. At the time of the accident, the engine and carburetor had been operated for about 1,520 total hours.

Weather reported at the LUL, at 1035, was calm wind, clear skies, and visibility greater than 10 miles. The temperature was 68 degrees F and the dew point was 59 degrees F. 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 67, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/30/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/29/2016
Flight Time: 90 hours (Total, all aircraft), 60 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N499TG
Model/Series: PA28 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1974
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28-7425318
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/06/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2150 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6366 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320-E3D
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LUL, 238 ft msl
Observation Time: 1035 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 80°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C / 15°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Hattiesburg, MS (PIB)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Laurel, MS (LUL)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1000 CDT
Type of Airspace: Unknown 

Airport Information


Airport: Hesler-Noble Field (LUL)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 238 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 13
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5513 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing; Go Around 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  31.000000, -89.000000 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA005
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 01, 2016 in Laurel, MS
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N499TG
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 1, 2016, about 1019 central daylight time, a Piper PA28-140, N499TG, was substantially damaged during a forced landing after a total loss of engine power while executing a go-around at the Hesler-Noble Airport (LUL), Laurel, Mississippi. The student pilot/registered owner/operator was not injured. No flight plan was filed for the flight that originated at the Hattiesburg-Laurel Regional Airport (PIB), Hattiesburg-Laurel, Mississippi, about 1000. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight conducted under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The student pilot stated that he filled both fuel tanks to the tabs before he departed and then flew to LUL to practice takeoffs and landings. Before making his first landing, he checked that the mixture was full-rich, and the electric fuel pump and carburetor heat were turned on. The pilot reduced rpm and extended the flaps; however, he realized he was too high and elected to go-around. The pilot applied full power and the rpms increased. The flaps were retracted and he turned off the carburetor heat. At that point, the engine started running rough and he turned the carburetor heat back on, re-checked that the electric fuel pump was still on, and switched fuel tanks, but the engine rpm did not increase. The pilot was unable to maintain altitude and made a forced landing to a field adjacent to the airport. During the landing roll, the left main landing gear hit a large hole resulting in substantial damage to the left main gear, left wing, and an engine mount. Weather reported at the LUL, at 1035, was calm wind, clear skies, and visibility greater than 10 miles. The temperature was 68 degrees F and the dew point was 59 degrees F.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

I learned to fly in a PA-161 Warrior II and was taught to only used carb heat when icing is suspected due to loss of rpm. I thought only Cessnas used carb heat routinely for landing?