Saturday, September 16, 2017

Cirrus SR22, N462SR, owned by Lind's Plumbing and Heating Inc and operated by a private individual: Fatal accident occurred September 15, 2017 in Glenwood Springs, Garfield County, Colorado

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota
Continental Motors Group; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Lind's Plumbing and Heating Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N462SR 

NTSB Identification: CEN17FA354
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 15, 2017 in Glenwood Springs, CO
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N462SR
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 15, 2017, about 2010 mountain daylight time, a Cirrus SR22 airplane, N462SR, impacted trees and terrain while maneuvering in mountainous terrain near Glenwood Springs, Colorado. The non-instrument rated private pilot and three passengers were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was owned by Lind's Plumbing and Heating, Inc., Fort Collins, Colorado, and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan had been filed. The personal cross-country flight departed from the Fort Collins-Loveland Municipal Airport (FNL), Fort Collins/Loveland, Colorado, about 1921, and was destined for Canyonlands Field Airport (CNY), Moab, Utah.

According to preliminary air traffic control information, the airplane departed FNL and the pilot was receiving VFR flight following. Radar track data indicated the airplane traveled on a westerly heading after departure, and then turned to a southwesterly heading at an indicated altitude of about 11,000 ft mean sea level (msl). About 10 miles northeast of Glenwood Springs, the airplane turned to the northwest, climbed to about 12,000 ft msl, and continued northwest for about 12 miles. The airplane then turned back to the southwest and gradually descended. The last recorded radar data was at 2009:32, at altitude 11,400 ft msl, and about 1/4 mile south of the accident site location.

Later than evening, family members reported the airplane overdue at CNY and a search was initiated. The accident site was visually located by search and rescue personnel at 1137 on September 16, 2017.

The accident site was located on rocky and tree covered mountainous terrain about 11,200 ft msl. The airplane impacted trees and terrain on a measured magnetic heading of about 075 degrees. A post-impact fire consumed a portion of the airplane wreckage. The initial impact point on the terrain contained a portion of a propeller blade, fragments of the engine and engine mount, and forward fuselage structure. Several trees were severed at different heights, just prior to the initial impact with terrain. The airframe and engine were fragmented and distributed in the debris field. The Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS) components were separated from the airframe and distributed in the debris field. The parachute was fully extended in a folded state with the slider at the base and entangled in tree branches. The CAPS rocket was located about 200 feet from the initial impact and was not expended.

At 2008, weather station 5 SM, located at 10,600 feet msl about 16 miles south-southwest of the accident site, reported the wind from 240 degrees at 11 knots, gusting to 23 knots, wind direction varying between 210 and 280 degrees, 1/2-mile visibility, fog, overcast ceiling at 200 feet, temperature 2 degrees C, dew point 1 degree C, and altimeter setting of 30.24 inches of Mercury.

According to the U.S. Naval Observatory, at Glenwood Springs the sunset was at 1917, and the end of civil twilight was at 1944.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov 



Jeff, Jennifer Hickey Makepeace, Addison and Benjamin


GLENWOOD SPRINGS - Investigators are beginning their work to piece together what caused a single-engine plane carrying a Fort Collins family of four to crash near Glenwood Springs.

Jeff Makepeace, his wife, Jennifer and their two children, Addison and Benjamin did not survive the crash.

The family took off in a Cirrus SR22 from Fort Collins-Loveland Municipal Airport sometime Friday evening headed to Moab, Utah.

Radar from Friday night showed thunderstorms from Fort Collins all the way to Glenwood Springs. Contact with the plane was lost around 8:00 p.m.

“The weather Friday night especially over the mountains was not conducive to what we call VFR flying or visual flight rules,” said 9NEWS aviation analyst, Greg Feith.

Feith said the weather is one of several factors investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board would consider.

“Investigators are going to have to track down all the facets or pieces of the aircraft and the component parts, try to account for all of those to ensure that there was no evidence of mechanical malfunction or failure,” Feith explained.

Feith said investigators would also look into the pilot’s flying experience. FAA records show Jeff Makepeace obtained his pilot certificate on March 1, 2017.

“Why did they have to leave at 8:00 o’clock Friday night, single engine aircraft over the Rocky Mountains?” Feith said. “Because those combination of factors is really a prescription for disaster, especially if you have inexperienced pilots.”
draft

The single-engine plane crashed about ten miles north of Glenwood Springs. First responders were not able to locate the wreckage until shortly before 11:30 Saturday morning.

Investigators from the NTSB and Federal Aviation Administration were expected to be on the ground Sunday. Feith said it was likely representatives from Cirrus and the plane’s engine manufacturer would be at the scene as well.


Story and video:  http://www.9news.com



Jeff Makepeace was adventurous and big-hearted, a self-made man who had recently gotten a pilot's license and was flying with his family to Moab when his plane crashed near Glenwood Springs last week, his brother said Monday.

"He truly was my hero," said Caleb Makepeace. "He would do anything for absolutely anybody."

Jeff and Jennifer Makepeace, his wife, and their two children, Addison and Benjamin, 10-year-old twins, died in the crash.

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the crash about 15 miles north of Glenwood Springs. "The aircraft, a Cirrus SR 22, disappeared below radar late Friday night and crashed under unknown circumstances," FAA spokesman Allen Kenitzer said in a email Monday.

Jeff, 47, who grew up in Naples, New York, a small town in the Finger Lakes region, moved to Colorado in the early 1990s, his brother said.

He went to work for Lind's Plumbing and Heating in Fort Collins and worked his way up in the company, said Caleb, 38. "In 2006, Master Plumber Jeff Makepeace — employed by the company's founder, Robert Lind — purchased the company," according to Lind's website.

He married Jennifer, 45, about 12 years ago. Their children turned 10 shortly before the accident.

Jeff and Jennifer, a homemaker, were a good pair. "She was very outgoing, a good match for Jeff, because she was adventurous," Caleb Makepeace said. "If he wanted to go climb a mountain, she was right there with him."

The twins, born within an hour of each other, were a study in opposites, Caleb said. Like his father, Benjamin was mechanically inclined and always on the run.

Addison was fond of the TV show "Little House on the Prairie," about a family living on a farm in Minnesota in the late 19th century. The show, based on a series of books by Laura Ingalls Wilder.

Addison was an "old soul," Caleb said. "She would dress up as Laura Ingalls in a little bonnet," Caleb said. "She loved to bake with my sister, who owns a bakery business in New York."

Jeff Makepeace got his pilot's license this year, and owned the plane that went down in the Baxter Peak area.

An air search found debris from the crash shortly before 11:40 a.m. Saturday.

The plane was last reported roughly nine miles north of Rifle.

The recovery effort is still underway, Caleb said.


Original article  ➤  http://www.fortmorgantimes.com

GARFIELD COUNTY, Colo. — A father and mother and their 10-year-old twins were killed in a plane crash in Garfield County on Friday. 

Jeff Makepeace, 47, and Jennifer Makepeace (nee: Hickey), 45, were longtime residents of Fort Collins. Jeff Makepeace was the owner of Lind’s Plumbing and Heating in Fort Collins.

Their children, Addison and Benjamin, were fourth-graders at Bauder Elementary School in Fort Collins.

The family was flying from Fort Collins-Loveland Municipal Airport to Moab, Utah, when the plane went down about 10 miles north of Glenwood Springs, according to a family member who is a FOX31 employee.

Family members issued a statement Sunday, that said in part:

“Our family’s hearts have been broken by this tragic accident. Our grief cannot be defined and will be prolonged. But our memories of this amazing family will last forever.

“The family would like to thank all of the first responders from the Garfield County Sheriff’s Office and search-and-rescue crews who braved trying and difficult conditions to reach the crash scene. We are eternally grateful for their efforts.

“We would also like to thank the Garfield County Sheriff’s Office. Sheriff Lou Vallario personally visited the family to offer his complete support. His entire staff has been diligent, respectful and extremely compassionate. Their support has been invaluable during this difficult time.

“Finally, the Garfield County Coroner’s Office, headed by Robert Glassmire, has been instrumental for us. Mr. Glassmire was at the scene and he provided the family with as much information that he could. We thank him for everything he and his office have done.”

The families have asked for privacy during this difficult time.

Funeral arrangements are still pending.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://kdvr.com


KUSA - A spokesperson for the Fort Collins family killed in a private plane crash on Friday has identified the victims as the Makepeace family.

Jeff Makepeace, 47, Jennifer Makepeace, 45, Addison and Benjamin Makepeace, both 10, died when the plane went down about 9 miles north of Glenwood Springs. 

Jeff, a business owner in FoCo, was heading with his family from Fort Collins-Loveland Municipal Airport to Moab, Utah.

Jennifer was a stay-at-home mother. Addison and Benjamin were fourth grade students at Bauder Elementary School in Fort Collins.

The family’s dog was also onboard the plane. The plane's make or tail number has not been released.

The crash site was found just after 11:30 a.m. on Saturday near Baxter Peak in northwest Colorado.

"Our family’s hearts have been broken by this tragic accident. Our grief cannot be defined and will be prolonged. But our memories of this amazing family will last forever," the statement read in part. 

The National Transportation Safety Board began an investigation on Sunday. 

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.9news.com

GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo. – A family of four, two adults and two children, were found dead among the wreckage of a small plane crash near Glenwood Springs Saturday morning.

The Garfield County Sheriff’s Office says the single-engine plane took off from Fort Collins Friday evening and was flying to Moab, Utah when it disappeared below radar near Baxter Peak, 15 miles north of Glenwood Springs.

The Cirrus SR22 crashed under unknown circumstances shortly after air traffic control lost contact with the plane. The victims’ identities have yet to be released. 

Garfield County authorities were notified of the missing plane Friday evening and immediately began searching the area for any signs of the aircraft.


The sheriff’s office says low hanging clouds dampened initial search efforts, but the downed plane was eventually spotted from the air around 11:30 a.m. Saturday. 


A large debris field marked the spot where the plane crashed. Aerial search crews were able to land near the crash site and confirmed that no one had survived. 


Ground crews were working Saturday to get to the scene to begin the investigation and recover the bodies.


The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the cause of the crash.


Original article  ➤ http://www.thedenverchannel.com

Sheriff Lou Vallario
Garfield County, Colorado
NEWS RELEASE 
For Immediate Release

Date: September 16, 2017
Time: 12:30 PM

Plane Down North of Glenwood Springs

IMPORTANT: Please direct any media requests to the contact above. Do not contact the Garfield County Emergency Communications Center or Patrol staff for media requests.

GARFIELD COUNTY, Colo. –   Early this morning the Garfield County Sheriff’s Office was notified of a private plane flying from Fort Collins to Moab, Utah. The plane was carrying a family of four, two adults and two children.

Civil Air Patrol and Classic Air were asked to assist with an aerial search. Due to heavy low hanging clouds the air search could not begin immediately. The last reported area was approximately nine miles north of Glenwood Springs near Baxter Peak.

By 11:37 AM the plane had been located. A large debris field was identified at the site. Classic Air was able to land in the area and established that there were no survivors.

Efforts are being made to get ground crews to the area.
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Four people were killed in a private plane crash north of Glenwood Springs late Friday.

The Garfield County Sheriff’s Office said it was notified early Saturday about the plane, which was flying from Fort Collins to Moab, Utah. Its last reported location was approximately 9 miles north of Rifle near Baxter Peak.

The plane was carrying a family of four, two adults and two children, the sheriff’s office said in a news release.

The Civil Air Patrol and a Classic Air medical helicopter based in Glenwood Springs were asked to assist with an aerial search, which was delayed Saturday morning by heavy, low-hanging clouds.

The Classic Air helicopter located the plane and a large debris field from the crash at roughly 11:35 a.m. Classic Air was able to land in the area and determined that no one survived.

Sheriff’s spokesman Walt Stowe said he could not confirm a report that campers heard the plane Friday evening, but said the crash occurred around 10 p.m. Weather was bad in the area Friday evening, with Glenwood High’s football game delayed for an hour by lightning.

Stowe said late Saturday afternoon that he did not know if ground search teams had been able to reach the site. He said the National Transportation Safety Board would seek to get to the location on Sunday.

Reports said the aircraft was a Cirrus SR22, a single-engine plane.

Original article ➤  http://www.postindependent.com

GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo. (CBS4)– A private plane carrying a family crashed near Glenwood Springs, killed everyone on board.

The family of four, two adults and two children, were on the plane that was flying from Fort Collins to Utah.

Early Saturday morning, the Garfield County Sheriff’s Office was notified of the plane and its route. The Civil Air Patrol and Classic Air were asked to assist in the search but due to low-hanging clouds the search was delayed.

The last report of the plane was approximately nine miles north of Glenwood Springs near Baxter Peak. The FAA says the plane disappeared from radar on Friday evening.

The wreckage of the small plane was located just before noon in that area. There were no survivors.

Ground crews worked to get to the wreckage. Those aboard the plane have not been identified.

What caused the crash will be investigated once crews reach the wreckage.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://denver.cbslocal.com 

GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo. (KKTV) - Deputies have confirmed that a family of four died in a plane crash early Saturday morning.

The crash happened just north of Glenwood Springs, about nine miles north of Rifle. The sheriff's office responded to the call and found the wreckage just before 11:45 a.m.

The investigation revealed two adults and two children were traveling from Fort Collins to Utah before it crashed.

It's unknown what caused the crash at this time.

Deputies called in Civil Air Patrol and Classic Air to help with the search before the plane was found, but could not immediately begin efforts because of the low-hanging clouds.

Ground crews are still on their way to the area.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.kktv.com


GARFIELD COUNTY, Colo. — A small plane carrying a family of four from the Front Range crashed north of Rifle Friday night. The Garfield County Sheriff’s Office said two adults and two children on board died.

The plane was flying from Fort Collins to Utah when radar contact was lost with it according to a Garfield County Sheriff’s Office spokesman. The plane’s last reported location was north of Glenwood Springs near Baxter Peak.

The Civil Air Patrol and Garfield County Search and Rescue teams launched a search Saturday morning. A helicopter crew found the wreckage a little after 11:30 a.m. That crew landed and was able to determine there were no survivors.

Efforts then started to get ground crews to the site.

It was not clear exactly when the plane crashed. The sheriff’s office said it was notified about it early Saturday morning.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://kdvr.com


GLENWOOD SPRINGS (AP) — Authorities say two adults and two children were killed when the private plane they were traveling in went down in western Colorado.

A statement from the Garfield County Sheriff's Office says the plane carrying the family of four was traveling from Fort Collins to Utah. The sheriff's office was asked to search for the plane early Saturday morning.

The statement says the plane's last reported location was about 9 miles (14.48 kilometers) north of Rifle, near Baxter Peak. That's about 170 miles (273.58 kilometers) west of Denver.

The statement says searchers found a "large debris field" around 11:37 a.m. Searchers were able to land and found that no one had survived.

The sheriff's office is trying to get ground crews to the area.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.coloradoan.com

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Another Cirrus crash by an inexperienced pilot. Very sad.

Anonymous said...

So very sad....rookie pilot... very dark night...thunderstorms in the area with lightning...not instrument rated....mountainous terrain...

jbermo said...

I believe that the pilot's flight instructor may be somewhat culpable, in that perhaps he failed to adequately impress upon his former student a required respect for the limitations and risks of inexperienced pilots.

Anonymous said...

>I believe that the pilot's flight instructor may be somewhat culpable.

I don't. To a very large degree all of us pilots have to learn to think for ourselves. Especially in this day and age when there are a multitude of sources to find information. Unfortunately sometimes you can't "teach" common sense and tragedy follows.

Anonymous said...

As a Flight Instructor, it is always sad to see these pictures of a family aboard an aircraft that lost control. We try to teach some good decision making and planning skills, but once a student is certified they are legally in a position to do themselves and their families harm.
I was very lucky to have a Flight Instructor Dad, who also owned the Family Cherokee Six. I wasn't going anywhere without a chat with him, complete with weather and Load charts. Also, i wasn't touching that airplane until i had my instrument rating, even then i was green with very little real weather experience. The point is that i had a "Mentor" to check with and that is missing in General Aviation today. That man should have never been allowed to try that trip in that airplane. We need some sort of a "Mentor requirement" for low time pilots. That poor family.

Anonymous said...

Sad indeed... as an instrument pilot with training for a commercial I cannot stress enough how much a private pilot license is just one to keep learning. Or you become dangerous.

I wouldn't dare put friends and relatives in my plane unless it's bright daytime VFR. This is my limits for now until I feel safe enough to do by myself.

Risks exist in Aviation as much as in motorcycle riding, but the later is limited to mostly solo riders with the occasional backseat passenger and most crashes are due to poor judgement on sportsbikes ridden solo. For planes on the other hand 3-4 or even 6 people can fit in and therein lies the greater responsability of any pilot to do anything he humanly can to assure of the successful outcome of the flight.