Saturday, September 16, 2017

Loss of Control in Flight: Cirrus SR22, N462SR; fatal accident occurred September 15, 2017 in Glenwood Springs, Garfield County, Colorado

Jeff, Jennifer Hickey Makepeace, Addison and Benjamin


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.


Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota
Continental Motors Group; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N462SR 


Analysis 

The non-instrument-rated private pilot and three passengers departed on a night cross-country flight over mountainous terrain. Radar track data showed that the airplane traveled mainly on a southwesterly heading directly towards its destination with a series of altitude changes. About 5 minutes before the accident, the airplane turned to the northwest, a deviation off the destination course, and continued northwest for about 12 miles. After the turn, a passenger sent a text message to a family member stating that they were "taking the long way around, lots of weather, keep you posted." Shortly thereafter, the airplane entered a gradual left turn to the southwest, descending from 11,500 ft to 11,300 ft, then climbing back to 11,400 ft. The last recorded radar return was about 1/4 mile south of the accident site, which was located at an elevation of 10,800 ft. Postaccident examination of the airframe and engine showed severe fragmentation of the airplane consistent with a high-energy impact and did not reveal any preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The flight was likely operating in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) at the time of the accident, including light to moderate icing conditions. The airplane likely encountered intermittent IMC beginning about 30 minutes after takeoff, and continued into an area of solid IMC about 3 minutes before the accident occurred.

There was no record of the pilot retrieving preflight weather information from an official, access-controlled source, and what weather information, if any, he obtained before or during the flight could not be determined. Based on the weather forecasts and information valid before the airplane departed and while en route, and the equipment available onboard the airplane, there was sufficient weather information available to the pilot before and during the flight to make informed decisions regarding the weather he would likely encounter.

The night instrument conditions present at the time of the accident were conducive to the development of spatial disorientation and the circumstances of the accident. The non-instrument-rated pilot's continued flight into IMC, the airplane's descending turn depicted on radar, and the fragmentation of the wreckage due to high-energy impact are all consistent with the known effects of a loss of control due to spatial disorientation. It is likely that, while maneuvering, the pilot experienced spatial disorientation, which resulted in a loss of control and subsequent descent into terrain. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The non-instrument-rated pilot's inadequate preflight weather planning, his decision to depart into forecast instrument meteorological conditions along the route of flight, and his continued visual flight into instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in spatial disorientation and a subsequent loss of airplane control.

Findings

Aircraft
Performance/control parameters - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Weather planning - Pilot (Cause)
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Cause)
Spatial disorientation - Pilot (Cause)
Recent instrument experience - Pilot

Environmental issues
Ceiling/visibility/precip - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information

History of Flight

Maneuvering
VFR encounter with IMC

Loss of control in flight (Defining event)

Jeff and Jennifer Makepeace, his wife, and their two children, Addison and Benjamin, 10-year-old twins, died in the crash.


On September 15, 2017, about 2010 mountain daylight time, a Cirrus SR22 airplane, N462SR, impacted trees and mountainous terrain while maneuvering near Glenwood Springs, Colorado. The non-instrument-rated private pilot and three passengers were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was owned by Lind's Plumbing and Heating, Inc., Fort Collins, Colorado, and was being operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan was filed for the personal cross-country flight, which from Fort Collins-Loveland Municipal Airport (FNL), Fort Collins/Loveland, Colorado, about 1920, and was destined for Canyonlands Field Airport (CNY), Moab, Utah.

According to air traffic control information from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the pilot was receiving VFR flight-following services during the flight. Radar track data indicated that the airplane departed and traveled on a southwesterly heading toward the destination. At 1925, the pilot stated to the controller that he was going to climb the airplane to 15,000 ft mean sea level (msl) to "get over the mountains and then back down." At 1928, the airplane turned to a southwesterly direct heading to CNY at an indicated altitude about 10,700 ft msl. By 1932, the airplane had climbed to 13,200 ft and stopped climbing. From 1940 to 2000, radar data showed the airplane on a southwest heading with a series of altitude changes between 13,200 ft and 10,500 ft. At 2004, about 10 miles northeast of Glenwood Springs, Colorado, the airplane turned to the northwest, at an altitude of 11,500 ft msl, and continued northwest for about 12 miles (See Figure 1).


Figure 1 Entire Flight Radar Track

At 2008, a passenger sent a text message to her mother, "Taking the long way around, lots of weather, keep you posted." From 2008:32 to 2009:08, the airplane was in a gradual left turn to the southwest, descending from 11,500 ft to 11,300 ft, then climbing to 11,400 ft. The last recorded radar return was at 2009:32 at an altitude of 11,400 ft msl and about 1/4 mile south of the accident site (See Figure 2).

Figure 2 Radar Flight Track - Final Segment

Later that evening, family members reported the airplane was overdue to CNY, and a search was initiated. Search and rescue personnel located the accident site in mountainous terrain at 1137 the following morning. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 47, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/14/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/01/2017
Flight Time:  303.8 hours (Total, all aircraft), 257.8 hours (Total, this make and model), 155.3 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 55.7 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3.6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

A review of FAA records revealed that the pilot obtained his private pilot certificate on March 1, 2017. The pilot did not hold an instrument rating; his logbook revealed that he had accumulated 2.4 hours in simulated instrument conditions.

The pilot's logbook contained an entry for a flight on May 2, 2017, that contained the pilot's remarks, "First flight over clouds where I could not see the ground (CO Springs)."

According to the pilot's flight instructor, the pilot had recently completed a mountain flying and high altitude operations course sponsored by the Colorado Pilot's Association. A few days before the accident, the flight instructor spoke to the pilot about the planned flight to CNY. The pilot stated that he did not want to leave later than 1800 and that he would use ForeFlight to obtain weather and flight plan information.

According to family members, the pilot's initial plan was to depart for CNY about 1530; however, a business issue resulted in a delayed departure.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP
Registration: N462SR
Model/Series: SR22 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2007
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 2495
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/01/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1468 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-550-N
Registered Owner: LINDS PLUMBING AND HEATING INC
Rated Power: 310 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

The Cirrus SR22 is a single-engine, low-wing airplane with four seats, fixed tricycle landing gear, and dual yoke controls. The accident airplane, serial number 2495, was manufactured in 2007. It was equipped with a 310-horsepower Teledyne Continental Motors IO-550-N six-cylinder, air-cooled, fuel-injected, horizontally opposed reciprocating engine. The three-blade, constant speed propeller was a Hartzell Model PHC-J3YF-1N. The accident airplane was equipped with a Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS) designed to recover the airplane from catastrophic emergencies in which normal emergency procedures are ineffective. The airplane was also equipped with NEXRAD/XM satellite weather information.

The airplane was registered to the pilot/owner on February 18, 2016.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: 5SM, 10604 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2008 MDT
Direction from Accident Site: 225°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  0.5 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 200 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 11 knots / 23 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 240°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.24 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 2°C / 1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - In the Vicinity - Showers - Fog
Departure Point: Fort Collins, CO (FNL)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Moab, UT (CNY)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1920 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

According to Leidos Flight Service and Direct User Access Terminal Service (DUATS), the accident pilot did not contact Leidos or DUATS for preflight weather information. A search of archived ForeFlight data revealed no record of the accident pilot accessing weather information; however, with no internet access while in flight, ForeFlight is able to access weather information directly from the FAA, leaving no remote record of such access. Therefore, it is possible that the accident pilot was receiving weather updates during the flight. There was no record of the accident pilot receiving or retrieving any other weather information before the accident flight.

The National Weather Service (NWS) Storm Prediction Center (SPC) Day One convective outlook was issued at 1400 and valid through 0600 the following day. The accident site was included in a "TSTM" area, defined as an area where a 10% or higher probability of thunderstorms is forecast during the valid period.

Rifle Garfield County Airport (RIL), Rifle, Colorado, located 20 miles southwest of the accident site, was the closest official weather station to the accident site. It was at an elevation of 5,537 ft and was equipped with an Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS).

At 1953, the RIL ASOS reported wind from 300° at 5 knots, 10 miles visibility or greater, broken ceiling at 7,500 ft agl, overcast skies at 9,500 ft agl, temperature 12° C, dew point temperature 8° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.04 inches of mercury. Remarks, station with a precipitation discriminator, lightning distant south, rain ended at 1948.

At 2053, the RIL ASOS reported variable wind direction at 3 knots, 10 miles visibility or greater, broken ceiling at 6,000 ft agl, overcast skies at 8,000 ft agl, temperature 12° C, dew point temperature 8° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.07 inches of mercury.

Sunlight Peak (5SM), located 16 miles south of the accident site at an elevation of 10,604 ft, was equipped with an Automated Weather Observing System (AWOS).

At 1950, the 5SM AWOS reported wind from 240° at 11 knots with gusts to 23 knots, wind direction variable from 210° to 280°, 1/4 mile visibility, thunderstorm with light rain in the vicinity, overcast ceiling at 200 ft agl, temperature 1° C, dew point temperature 1° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.23 inches of mercury.

At 2008, the 5SM AWOS reported wind from 240° at 11 knots with gusts to 23 knots, wind direction variable from 210° to 280°, 1/2 mile visibility, fog, overcast ceiling at 200 ft agl, temperature 2° C, dew point temperature 1° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.24 inches of mercury.

At 2031, the 5SM AWOS reported wind from 240° at 12 knots with gusts to 24 knots, wind direction variable from 180° to 300°, 1 1/4 miles visibility, light rain, overcast ceiling at 200 ft agl, temperature 2° C, dew point temperature 1° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.24 inches of mercury.

The observations from 5SM indicated low instrument flight rules conditions with gusty winds, light rain, distant lightning, and thunderstorms in the vicinity. RIL reported VFR conditions with rain and distant lightning.

Upper air data near the accident site at 2000 indicated a mostly conditionally unstable layer between the surface (10,548 ft) and 18,000 ft. Rawinsonde Observation program indicated that clouds were likely near the surface through 12,000 ft. A small layer of rime icing conditions was indicated about 12,500 ft.

Infrared data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite number 16 (GOES-16) was obtained. Satellite imagery surrounding the time of the accident was reviewed and indicated cloud cover over the accident site with the cloud cover moving from southwest to northeast. At 2015, the approximate cloud-top heights were 22,000 ft over the accident site (See Figure 3).

Figure 3 GOES-16 Infrared Image at 2015 MDT

The closest NWS Weather Surveillance Radar-1988, Doppler (WSR-88D), was the Grand Junction, Colorado, radar, located 55 miles southwest of the accident site at an elevation of 9,992 ft. Base reflectivity values between 2007 and 2012 above the accident site corresponded to light precipitation (See Figure 4). No lightning strikes were noted near the accident site at the accident time.

Figure 4 WSR-88D Reflectivity Scan at 2012 MDT

Convective SIGMET advisory 1W was valid for the accident site from 1855 to 2055 and warned of an area of thunderstorms with tops to flight level (FL) 350 with the SIGMET area moving from 250° at 25 kts. Convective SIGMET 10C was valid for the accident site from 1955 to 2155 and warned of an area of thunderstorms with tops to FL370 with the SIGMET area moving from 230° at 20 kts.

AIRMET advisory Tango was issued at 1445 and valid for the accident site at the accident time. The AIRMET forecasted moderate turbulence below 18,000 ft.

The Area Forecast issued at 1345 and valid at the accident time forecast a broken ceiling at 9,000 ft with tops at FL230, isolated thunderstorms with light rain, and thunderstorm tops at FL360. Between 1800 and 2100, conditions were forecast to include a broken cloud ceiling at 8,000 ft with tops at FL270 and isolated thunderstorms with light rain.

The Forecast Icing Potential (FIP) indicated that icing near the accident site would likely be trace to moderate levels at 2000. The FIP did not indicate any Supercooled Large Droplet potential over the accident area at the accident time.

According to the U.S. Naval Observatory, the sunset near the accident site at 1917, and the end of civil twilight was at 1944. The moon was not visible around the accident site at the accident time. 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 39.410000, -107.210000


The accident site was located on rocky, tree-covered mountainous terrain about 10,800 ft msl (See Figure 5). The airplane impacted trees and terrain on a measured magnetic heading about 075°. A postimpact fire consumed a portion of the airplane. The initial impact point contained a portion of a propeller blade, fragments of the engine and engine mount, and forward fuselage structure. Several trees were severed at different heights before the initial impact with terrain. Based on the tree impacts, the calculated bank angle at the initial impact was about 34° right wing low.

Figure 5 Accident Site

The airframe and engine were fragmented and distributed in the debris field. The CAPS components were separated from the airframe and distributed in the debris field. The parachute was fully extended in a folded state with the slider at the base of the parachute canopy and entangled in tree branches. The CAPS rocket was located about 200 ft from the initial impact and was not expended.

Due to snow and terrain conditions, the wreckage was recovered on June 28, 2018. On August 29, 2018, the wreckage was examined by the NTSB investigator-in-charge, and representatives from Cirrus Aircraft and Continental Motors. Examination of the wreckage revealed the fuselage, flight control surfaces, instrument panel, engine, and propeller assembly were fragmented and destroyed. Flight control continuity established to rudder and elevators. Aileron control cables separated in multiple locations, and a portion of the forward aileron control cable was not observed. Control cable and pulley damage was consistent with overload failures. A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

The Avidyne Digital Flight Control (DFC) 90 autopilot unit was recovered and the internal micro SD card removed. The micro SD card was sent the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory for further examination and data extraction. Due to damage on the SD card, data recovery was unsuccessful.

Medical And Pathological Information

The Garfield County Coroner's Office, Grand Junction, Colorado, performed autopsies on the pilot and passengers. The cause of death listed for each occupant was multiple blunt force injuries.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing on specimens of the pilot. Testing was not performed for carbon monoxide and cyanide, and testing was negative for ethanol and drugs.

Additional Information

Spatial Disorientation

According to FAA Safety Team literature, pilots flying under both instrument and visual flight rules are subject to spatial disorientation and optical illusions that may cause a loss of aircraft control. Sight, supported by other senses, allows a pilot to maintain orientation while flying. However, when visibility is restricted (i.e., no visual reference to the horizon or surface detected) the body's supporting senses can conflict with what is seen. When this spatial disorientation occurs, sensory conflicts and optical illusions often make it difficult for a pilot to tell which way is up. Contributing to these phenomena are the various types of sensory stimuli: visual, vestibular (organs of equilibrium located in the inner ear), and proprioceptive (receptors located in the skin, muscles, tendons and joints). Changes in linear acceleration, angular acceleration, and gravity are detected by the vestibular system and the proprioceptive receptors, and then compared in the brain with visual information. In a flight environment, these stimuli can vary in magnitude, direction, and frequency, resulting in a sensory mismatch that can produce illusions and lead to spatial disorientation.


 NTSB Identification: CEN17FA354
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 15, 2017 in Glenwood Springs, CO
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N462SR
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 15, 2017, about 2010 mountain daylight time, a Cirrus SR22 airplane, N462SR, impacted trees and terrain while maneuvering in mountainous terrain near Glenwood Springs, Colorado. The non-instrument rated private pilot and three passengers were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was owned by Lind's Plumbing and Heating, Inc., Fort Collins, Colorado, and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan had been filed. The personal cross-country flight departed from the Fort Collins-Loveland Municipal Airport (FNL), Fort Collins/Loveland, Colorado, about 1921, and was destined for Canyonlands Field Airport (CNY), Moab, Utah.

According to preliminary air traffic control information, the airplane departed FNL and the pilot was receiving VFR flight following. Radar track data indicated the airplane traveled on a westerly heading after departure, and then turned to a southwesterly heading at an indicated altitude of about 11,000 ft mean sea level (msl). About 10 miles northeast of Glenwood Springs, the airplane turned to the northwest, climbed to about 12,000 ft msl, and continued northwest for about 12 miles. The airplane then turned back to the southwest and gradually descended. The last recorded radar data was at 2009:32, at altitude 11,400 ft msl, and about 1/4 mile south of the accident site location.

Later than evening, family members reported the airplane overdue at CNY and a search was initiated. The accident site was visually located by search and rescue personnel at 1137 on September 16, 2017.

The accident site was located on rocky and tree covered mountainous terrain about 11,200 ft msl. The airplane impacted trees and terrain on a measured magnetic heading of about 075 degrees. A post-impact fire consumed a portion of the airplane wreckage. The initial impact point on the terrain contained a portion of a propeller blade, fragments of the engine and engine mount, and forward fuselage structure. Several trees were severed at different heights, just prior to the initial impact with terrain. The airframe and engine were fragmented and distributed in the debris field. The Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS) components were separated from the airframe and distributed in the debris field. The parachute was fully extended in a folded state with the slider at the base and entangled in tree branches. The CAPS rocket was located about 200 feet from the initial impact and was not expended.

At 2008, weather station 5 SM, located at 10,600 feet msl about 16 miles south-southwest of the accident site, reported the wind from 240 degrees at 11 knots, gusting to 23 knots, wind direction varying between 210 and 280 degrees, 1/2-mile visibility, fog, overcast ceiling at 200 feet, temperature 2 degrees C, dew point 1 degree C, and altimeter setting of 30.24 inches of Mercury.

According to the U.S. Naval Observatory, at Glenwood Springs the sunset was at 1917, and the end of civil twilight was at 1944.
=======

GLENWOOD SPRINGS - Investigators are beginning their work to piece together what caused a single-engine plane carrying a Fort Collins family of four to crash near Glenwood Springs.

Jeff Makepeace, his wife, Jennifer and their two children, Addison and Benjamin did not survive the crash.

The family took off in a Cirrus SR22 from Fort Collins-Loveland Municipal Airport sometime Friday evening headed to Moab, Utah.

Radar from Friday night showed thunderstorms from Fort Collins all the way to Glenwood Springs. Contact with the plane was lost around 8:00 p.m.

“The weather Friday night especially over the mountains was not conducive to what we call VFR flying or visual flight rules,” said 9NEWS aviation analyst, Greg Feith.

Feith said the weather is one of several factors investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board would consider.

“Investigators are going to have to track down all the facets or pieces of the aircraft and the component parts, try to account for all of those to ensure that there was no evidence of mechanical malfunction or failure,” Feith explained.

Feith said investigators would also look into the pilot’s flying experience. FAA records show Jeff Makepeace obtained his pilot certificate on March 1, 2017.

“Why did they have to leave at 8:00 o’clock Friday night, single engine aircraft over the Rocky Mountains?” Feith said. “Because those combination of factors is really a prescription for disaster, especially if you have inexperienced pilots.”
draft

The single-engine plane crashed about ten miles north of Glenwood Springs. First responders were not able to locate the wreckage until shortly before 11:30 Saturday morning.

Investigators from the NTSB and Federal Aviation Administration were expected to be on the ground Sunday. Feith said it was likely representatives from Cirrus and the plane’s engine manufacturer would be at the scene as well.


Story and video:  http://www.9news.com

Jeff Makepeace was adventurous and big-hearted, a self-made man who had recently gotten a pilot's license and was flying with his family to Moab when his plane crashed near Glenwood Springs last week, his brother said Monday.

"He truly was my hero," said Caleb Makepeace. "He would do anything for absolutely anybody."

Jeff and Jennifer Makepeace, his wife, and their two children, Addison and Benjamin, 10-year-old twins, died in the crash.

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the crash about 15 miles north of Glenwood Springs. "The aircraft, a Cirrus SR 22, disappeared below radar late Friday night and crashed under unknown circumstances," FAA spokesman Allen Kenitzer said in a email Monday.

Jeff, 47, who grew up in Naples, New York, a small town in the Finger Lakes region, moved to Colorado in the early 1990s, his brother said.

He went to work for Lind's Plumbing and Heating in Fort Collins and worked his way up in the company, said Caleb, 38. "In 2006, Master Plumber Jeff Makepeace — employed by the company's founder, Robert Lind — purchased the company," according to Lind's website.

He married Jennifer, 45, about 12 years ago. Their children turned 10 shortly before the accident.

Jeff and Jennifer, a homemaker, were a good pair. "She was very outgoing, a good match for Jeff, because she was adventurous," Caleb Makepeace said. "If he wanted to go climb a mountain, she was right there with him."

The twins, born within an hour of each other, were a study in opposites, Caleb said. Like his father, Benjamin was mechanically inclined and always on the run.

Addison was fond of the TV show "Little House on the Prairie," about a family living on a farm in Minnesota in the late 19th century. The show, based on a series of books by Laura Ingalls Wilder.

Addison was an "old soul," Caleb said. "She would dress up as Laura Ingalls in a little bonnet," Caleb said. "She loved to bake with my sister, who owns a bakery business in New York."

Jeff Makepeace got his pilot's license this year, and owned the plane that went down in the Baxter Peak area.

An air search found debris from the crash shortly before 11:40 a.m. Saturday.

The plane was last reported roughly nine miles north of Rifle.

The recovery effort is still underway, Caleb said.


Original article  ➤  http://www.fortmorgantimes.com

GARFIELD COUNTY, Colo. — A father and mother and their 10-year-old twins were killed in a plane crash in Garfield County on Friday. 

Jeff Makepeace, 47, and Jennifer Makepeace (nee: Hickey), 45, were longtime residents of Fort Collins. Jeff Makepeace was the owner of Lind’s Plumbing and Heating in Fort Collins.

Their children, Addison and Benjamin, were fourth-graders at Bauder Elementary School in Fort Collins.

The family was flying from Fort Collins-Loveland Municipal Airport to Moab, Utah, when the plane went down about 10 miles north of Glenwood Springs, according to a family member who is a FOX31 employee.

Family members issued a statement Sunday, that said in part:

“Our family’s hearts have been broken by this tragic accident. Our grief cannot be defined and will be prolonged. But our memories of this amazing family will last forever.

“The family would like to thank all of the first responders from the Garfield County Sheriff’s Office and search-and-rescue crews who braved trying and difficult conditions to reach the crash scene. We are eternally grateful for their efforts.

“We would also like to thank the Garfield County Sheriff’s Office. Sheriff Lou Vallario personally visited the family to offer his complete support. His entire staff has been diligent, respectful and extremely compassionate. Their support has been invaluable during this difficult time.

“Finally, the Garfield County Coroner’s Office, headed by Robert Glassmire, has been instrumental for us. Mr. Glassmire was at the scene and he provided the family with as much information that he could. We thank him for everything he and his office have done.”

The families have asked for privacy during this difficult time.

Funeral arrangements are still pending.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://kdvr.com


KUSA - A spokesperson for the Fort Collins family killed in a private plane crash on Friday has identified the victims as the Makepeace family.

Jeff Makepeace, 47, Jennifer Makepeace, 45, Addison and Benjamin Makepeace, both 10, died when the plane went down about 9 miles north of Glenwood Springs. 

Jeff, a business owner in FoCo, was heading with his family from Fort Collins-Loveland Municipal Airport to Moab, Utah.

Jennifer was a stay-at-home mother. Addison and Benjamin were fourth grade students at Bauder Elementary School in Fort Collins.

The family’s dog was also onboard the plane. The plane's make or tail number has not been released.

The crash site was found just after 11:30 a.m. on Saturday near Baxter Peak in northwest Colorado.

"Our family’s hearts have been broken by this tragic accident. Our grief cannot be defined and will be prolonged. But our memories of this amazing family will last forever," the statement read in part. 

The National Transportation Safety Board began an investigation on Sunday. 

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.9news.com

GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo. – A family of four, two adults and two children, were found dead among the wreckage of a small plane crash near Glenwood Springs Saturday morning.

The Garfield County Sheriff’s Office says the single-engine plane took off from Fort Collins Friday evening and was flying to Moab, Utah when it disappeared below radar near Baxter Peak, 15 miles north of Glenwood Springs.

The Cirrus SR22 crashed under unknown circumstances shortly after air traffic control lost contact with the plane. The victims’ identities have yet to be released. 

Garfield County authorities were notified of the missing plane Friday evening and immediately began searching the area for any signs of the aircraft.


The sheriff’s office says low hanging clouds dampened initial search efforts, but the downed plane was eventually spotted from the air around 11:30 a.m. Saturday. 


A large debris field marked the spot where the plane crashed. Aerial search crews were able to land near the crash site and confirmed that no one had survived. 


Ground crews were working Saturday to get to the scene to begin the investigation and recover the bodies.


The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the cause of the crash.


Original article  ➤ http://www.thedenverchannel.com

Sheriff Lou Vallario
Garfield County, Colorado
NEWS RELEASE 
For Immediate Release

Date: September 16, 2017
Time: 12:30 PM

Plane Down North of Glenwood Springs

IMPORTANT: Please direct any media requests to the contact above. Do not contact the Garfield County Emergency Communications Center or Patrol staff for media requests.

GARFIELD COUNTY, Colo. –   Early this morning the Garfield County Sheriff’s Office was notified of a private plane flying from Fort Collins to Moab, Utah. The plane was carrying a family of four, two adults and two children.

Civil Air Patrol and Classic Air were asked to assist with an aerial search. Due to heavy low hanging clouds the air search could not begin immediately. The last reported area was approximately nine miles north of Glenwood Springs near Baxter Peak.

By 11:37 AM the plane had been located. A large debris field was identified at the site. Classic Air was able to land in the area and established that there were no survivors.

Efforts are being made to get ground crews to the area.
=========

Four people were killed in a private plane crash north of Glenwood Springs late Friday.

The Garfield County Sheriff’s Office said it was notified early Saturday about the plane, which was flying from Fort Collins to Moab, Utah. Its last reported location was approximately 9 miles north of Rifle near Baxter Peak.

The plane was carrying a family of four, two adults and two children, the sheriff’s office said in a news release.

The Civil Air Patrol and a Classic Air medical helicopter based in Glenwood Springs were asked to assist with an aerial search, which was delayed Saturday morning by heavy, low-hanging clouds.

The Classic Air helicopter located the plane and a large debris field from the crash at roughly 11:35 a.m. Classic Air was able to land in the area and determined that no one survived.

Sheriff’s spokesman Walt Stowe said he could not confirm a report that campers heard the plane Friday evening, but said the crash occurred around 10 p.m. Weather was bad in the area Friday evening, with Glenwood High’s football game delayed for an hour by lightning.

Stowe said late Saturday afternoon that he did not know if ground search teams had been able to reach the site. He said the National Transportation Safety Board would seek to get to the location on Sunday.

Reports said the aircraft was a Cirrus SR22, a single-engine plane.

Original article ➤  http://www.postindependent.com

GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo. (CBS4)– A private plane carrying a family crashed near Glenwood Springs, killed everyone on board.

The family of four, two adults and two children, were on the plane that was flying from Fort Collins to Utah.

Early Saturday morning, the Garfield County Sheriff’s Office was notified of the plane and its route. The Civil Air Patrol and Classic Air were asked to assist in the search but due to low-hanging clouds the search was delayed.

The last report of the plane was approximately nine miles north of Glenwood Springs near Baxter Peak. The FAA says the plane disappeared from radar on Friday evening.

The wreckage of the small plane was located just before noon in that area. There were no survivors.

Ground crews worked to get to the wreckage. Those aboard the plane have not been identified.

What caused the crash will be investigated once crews reach the wreckage.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://denver.cbslocal.com 

GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo. (KKTV) - Deputies have confirmed that a family of four died in a plane crash early Saturday morning.

The crash happened just north of Glenwood Springs, about nine miles north of Rifle. The sheriff's office responded to the call and found the wreckage just before 11:45 a.m.

The investigation revealed two adults and two children were traveling from Fort Collins to Utah before it crashed.

It's unknown what caused the crash at this time.

Deputies called in Civil Air Patrol and Classic Air to help with the search before the plane was found, but could not immediately begin efforts because of the low-hanging clouds.

Ground crews are still on their way to the area.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.kktv.com


GARFIELD COUNTY, Colo. — A small plane carrying a family of four from the Front Range crashed north of Rifle Friday night. The Garfield County Sheriff’s Office said two adults and two children on board died.

The plane was flying from Fort Collins to Utah when radar contact was lost with it according to a Garfield County Sheriff’s Office spokesman. The plane’s last reported location was north of Glenwood Springs near Baxter Peak.

The Civil Air Patrol and Garfield County Search and Rescue teams launched a search Saturday morning. A helicopter crew found the wreckage a little after 11:30 a.m. That crew landed and was able to determine there were no survivors.

Efforts then started to get ground crews to the site.

It was not clear exactly when the plane crashed. The sheriff’s office said it was notified about it early Saturday morning.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://kdvr.com


GLENWOOD SPRINGS (AP) — Authorities say two adults and two children were killed when the private plane they were traveling in went down in western Colorado.

A statement from the Garfield County Sheriff's Office says the plane carrying the family of four was traveling from Fort Collins to Utah. The sheriff's office was asked to search for the plane early Saturday morning.

The statement says the plane's last reported location was about 9 miles (14.48 kilometers) north of Rifle, near Baxter Peak. That's about 170 miles (273.58 kilometers) west of Denver.

The statement says searchers found a "large debris field" around 11:37 a.m. Searchers were able to land and found that no one had survived.

The sheriff's office is trying to get ground crews to the area.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.coloradoan.com

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Another Cirrus crash by an inexperienced pilot. Very sad.

Anonymous said...

So very sad....rookie pilot... very dark night...thunderstorms in the area with lightning...not instrument rated....mountainous terrain...

jbermo said...

I believe that the pilot's flight instructor may be somewhat culpable, in that perhaps he failed to adequately impress upon his former student a required respect for the limitations and risks of inexperienced pilots.

Anonymous said...

>I believe that the pilot's flight instructor may be somewhat culpable.

I don't. To a very large degree all of us pilots have to learn to think for ourselves. Especially in this day and age when there are a multitude of sources to find information. Unfortunately sometimes you can't "teach" common sense and tragedy follows.

Anonymous said...

As a Flight Instructor, it is always sad to see these pictures of a family aboard an aircraft that lost control. We try to teach some good decision making and planning skills, but once a student is certified they are legally in a position to do themselves and their families harm.
I was very lucky to have a Flight Instructor Dad, who also owned the Family Cherokee Six. I wasn't going anywhere without a chat with him, complete with weather and Load charts. Also, i wasn't touching that airplane until i had my instrument rating, even then i was green with very little real weather experience. The point is that i had a "Mentor" to check with and that is missing in General Aviation today. That man should have never been allowed to try that trip in that airplane. We need some sort of a "Mentor requirement" for low time pilots. That poor family.

Anonymous said...

Sad indeed... as an instrument pilot with training for a commercial I cannot stress enough how much a private pilot license is just one to keep learning. Or you become dangerous.

I wouldn't dare put friends and relatives in my plane unless it's bright daytime VFR. This is my limits for now until I feel safe enough to do by myself.

Risks exist in Aviation as much as in motorcycle riding, but the later is limited to mostly solo riders with the occasional backseat passenger and most crashes are due to poor judgement on sportsbikes ridden solo. For planes on the other hand 3-4 or even 6 people can fit in and therein lies the greater responsability of any pilot to do anything he humanly can to assure of the successful outcome of the flight.

Anonymous said...

Cirrus is a high performance, fast aircraft with serious low speed handling demands. It is the last aircraft I would recommend for a new pilot.

It appears this aviator broke many rules and lacked good aviation judjument which is acquired often over the years from practical experience.

Thor3 said...

Taking off at 8 pm to fly 400 + miles over mountains at night into IFR conditions.

By a pilot with only a VFR ticket

And his family.

How did that make any sense?

Anonymous said...

not even enough situational awareness to pull the chute

Anonymous said...

"Hey Jennifer, what are these treetops doing up here in the clouds ?"
- last words spoken by Jeff Makepeace
Seriously though - this blog and website should be mandatory reading for all new pilots so that they have a clearer idea of what they're getting into when they take themselves and their loved ones into the air, because in this case, it seems like he had NO IDEA that these combined factors of weather, mountainous terrain, and time of departure were a recipe for disaster given his level of experience. Even for a highly experienced pilot these are not exactly favourable conditions - I agree with the 'mentor' comment above - had he called someone and ran his plan by them he might have been advised to stay on the ground and would therefore still be around to fly another day and fit another pipe in his (obviously successful) business.