Saturday, September 16, 2017

Pulsar III, N747N, Steven & Miles LLC: Accident occurred May 29, 2015 near General Dick Stout Field Airport (1L8), Hurricane, Washington County, Utah



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Salt Lake City, Utah

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Steven & Miles LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N747N



NTSB Identification: WPR15LA170
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 29, 2015 in Hurricane, UT
Aircraft: DUENAS PULSAR III, registration: N747N
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On May 29, 2015, about 1100 mountain daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Pulsar III, N747N, collided with corral fences during an emergency off airport forced landing at Hurricane, Utah. The private pilot sustained serious injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The pilot/owner was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The local personal flight departed General Dick Stout Field (1L8) in Hurricane about 1000. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot reported that the purpose of the flight was to evaluate the effect of airstream cooling on the engine oil temperature once the airplane reached level flight. The plan was to circle above the airport while climbing to the desired altitude, establish level flight, observe the oil temperature, and land. After takeoff, climb performance and oil temperature were normal. At 5,100 ft msl (airport elevation was 3,347 ft), the pilot began to circle the airport. After three circles, he noticed that the oil temperature was about 220° F, and he began a shallow descent to help cool the engine.

About 4,500 ft, the oil temperature was about 230° F, and the engine shut off. He turned on the auxiliary fuel pump, and attempted to restart the engine. When it did not respond, he began a right turn towards runway 19 at 1L8. The airplane touched down short of the runway, and collided with the corral fences. The pilot sustained a serious head injury, and did not recall anything after the turn toward the airport.

One witness stated that he had observed the takeoff, and watched the airplane complete two climbing turns. He heard a radio transmission from someone asking the pilot if everything was alright. The pilot replied no, he was "dead sticking," which meant to the witness that the engine was not running. The witness observed the airplane was about 1/2 mile from the airport, and the propeller was not turning. He lost sight of the airplane just prior to touchdown.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The engine was an experimental Aeromaxx BB420 H, serial number 11U, rated at 118 hp. Aeromaxx used their own remanufactured and restored Corvair parts to build Corvair engines for homebuilt, experimental aircraft.

The experimental engine was not available for an exam.










NTSB Identification: WPR15LA170 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 30, 2015 in Hurricane, UT
Aircraft: DUENAS PULSAR III, registration: N747N
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 30, 2015, about 1049 mountain daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Duenas Pulsar III, N747N, collided with a corral during an emergency forced landing at Hurricane, Utah. The pilot/owner was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The private pilot sustained serious injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage to all airframe components. The local personal flight departed Hurricane about 1030. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot reported to a Federal Aviation Administration inspector that the purpose of the flight was to conduct engine testing. While maneuvering, the engine stopped producing power. The pilot set up for an emergency landing, but landed short of the runway.

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