Saturday, July 22, 2017

Cessna 182A, N5954B: Accident occurred December 19, 2016 near Apple Valley Airport (KAPV), San Bernardino County, California



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms



Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N5954B

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA098
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, December 18, 2016 in Apple Valley, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/20/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N5954B
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the single-engine airplane reported that, after traveling about 270 nautical miles (nm) to the destination airport, the pilot-controlled lighting would not illuminate when activated. The pilot diverted to an alternate airport that was 40 nm to the northeast, but the pilot reported that runway lighting was not available at the alternate airport. The pilot reported that he decided to fly about 70 nm southwest to another alternate airport, but the engine quit even though the fuel indicator showed that 1/4 tank of fuel remained. He reported that he entered a descending left turn, that he leveled the wings with no flaps, and that the airspeed was about 52 kts. The pilot recalled that the airplane landed hard and nosed over after the nose landing gear and propeller struck a berm. Substantial damage was sustained to both wings, the firewall, and empennage.

During the airplane recovery, the fuel selector was photographed in the right wing tank position. The left tank did not have any fuel in the tank, and the right tank contained about 2 cups of fuel.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) avionics inspector present during the examination of the airplane’s radios and antennas, no failures or malfunctions were identified.

According to the FAA Airport Facility Directory, both the destination and diversion airports were equipped with medium intensity runway lighting, and the first airport the pilot diverted from was equipped with precision approach path indicator lights. No NOTAMS pertaining to lighting were issued at these airports on the date of the accident.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot’s mismanagement of the available fuel, which resulted in a loss of engine power and a subsequent hard, off-airport landing and nose-over. 








The pilot in command (PIC) of the single-engine airplane reported that after traveling about 270 nautical miles (nm) to their destination airport, the pilot controlled lighting would not illuminate when activated. The PIC diverted to an alternate airport that was 40 nm to the northeast, but the PIC reported that runway lighting was not available at the alternate airport. The PIC reported that he decided to fly about 70 nm southwest to another alternate airport, but the engine quit although the fuel indicator showed ¼ tank of fuel remained. He reported that he entered a descending left turn, he leveled the wings, no flaps and the airspeed was about 52 kts. The PIC recalled that the airplane landed hard, and nosed over after the nose landing gear and propeller struck a berm. Substantial damage was sustained to both wings, the firewall, and empennage.

During the airplane recovery, the fuel selector was photographed in the right wing tank position. The left tank did not have any fuel in the tank, and the right tank contained about 2 cups of fuel.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration Avionics Inspector present during the examination of the airplane's radios and antennas, no failures or malfunctions were identified.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration Airport Facility Directory, both airports were equipped with Medium Intensity Runway Lighting, and the first airport the PIC diverted from was equipped with Precision Approach Path Indicator lights. There weren't any notices to airman for the above mentioned airports, pertaining to lighting the date of the accident.

The pilot reported that there were no pre-accident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

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