Sunday, July 30, 2017

Acro Sport II, N896JC: Accident occurred July 30, 2017 in Loudonville, Ashland County, Ohio

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA295
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 30, 2017 in Loudonville, OH
Aircraft: STEELE ACRO SPORT II, registration: N896JC
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 30, 2017, about 1700 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Steele Acro Sport II biplane, N896JC, nosed over during a forced landing following a partial loss of engine power near Loudonville, Ohio. The airline transport pilot reported he was uninjured and his passenger received minor injuries. The airplane sustained substantial wing damage during the nose over. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area of the accident site about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Smith Field Airport (SMD), near Fort Wayne, Indiana, and was destined for the Holmes County Airport (10G), near Millersburg, Ohio.

The pilot's accident report indicated the purpose of the flight was to return to Brunswick, Maine, from Oshkosh, Wisconsin after it had been recently restored. The return flight was conducted through multiple legs and refueling stops, the last one being SMD.

According to operations personnel at SMD, the airplane had landed at SMD and was serviced with 15.8 gallons of 100 low lead, self-serve fuel at 1543. The airplane departed SMD with a total of 18 gallons of fuel.

About 15 miles from the 10G and 1:15 hours into the flight, the pilot initiated a descent from 3,500 ft to 2,500 ft. When the pilot added power to level off, the engine began to run rough. The pilot said that he immediately applied carburetor heat and he observed no engine operation improvement. The engine continued to lose power and "sputter." The pilot selected a field for a forced landing. However, during the descent, the "undulating" features of the field were noticed. The pilot elected to land the airplane upslope, it rolled a short distance, regained flight at the crest of a hill, and touched down at the edge of a soy bean field. The airplane decelerated rapidly and nosed over.

Inspectors from the Federal Aviation Administration conducted a postaccident examination of the wreckage. Examination of the engine and fuel system revealed no preimpact anomalies that would have precluded operation of the engine.

At 1852, the recorded weather about 19 miles and 306° degrees from the accident site at the Mansfield Lahm Regional Airport (MFD), near Mansfield, Ohio, was: Wind 340° at 8 kts; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 26° C; dew point 14° C; altimeter 30.17 inches of mercury.

At 1752, the recorded weather at MFD was: Wind 360° at 9 kts; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 27° C; dew point 13° C; altimeter 30.17 inches of mercury.

At 1652, the recorded weather at MFD was: Wind 340° at 11 kts; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 28° C; dew point 15° C; altimeter 30.17 inches of mercury.

The recorded MFD temperature and dew point data were plotted on a carburetor icing chart. The charted data showed that the weather was conducive to serious icing at descent power near the time of the engine power loss.

The Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, in part, stated:

When conditions are conducive to carburetor icing during flight, periodic checks should be made to detect its presence. If detected, full carburetor heat should be applied immediately, and it should be left in the ON position until you are certain that all the ice has been removed. If ice is present, applying partial heat or leaving heat on for an insufficient time might aggravate the situation. In extreme cases of carburetor icing, even after the ice has been removed, full carburetor heat should be used to prevent further ice formation. A carburetor temperature gauge, if installed, is very useful in determining when to use carburetor heat.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Olmsted, Ohio
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N896JC

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA295
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 30, 2017 in Loudenville, OH
Aircraft: STEELE ACRO SPORT II, registration: N896JC
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 30, 2017, about 1900 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Steele Acro Sport II biplane, N896JC, nosed over during a forced landing following a partial loss of engine power near Loudenville, Ohio. The pilot and passenger received minor injuries. The airplane sustained substantial wing damage during the nose over. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area of the accident site about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Smith Field Airport (SMD), near Fort Wayne, Indiana, and was destined for the Holmes County Airport, near Millersburg, Ohio.

According to operations personnel at SMD, the airplane had landed there and self-serve fueling had been conducted at 1543. The airplane was serviced with 15.8 gallons of fuel.

At 1852, the recorded weather at the Mansfield Lahm Regional Airport, near Mansfield, Ohio, was: Wind 340° at 8 kts; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 26° C; dew point 14° C; altimeter 30.17 inches of mercury.








LOUDONVILLE, Ohio – Rick Wolf said he was out in his yard in Loudonville, enjoying a peaceful summer evening until he heard a strange sound.

“I looked up and saw a plane and I could hear the engine sputtering,” Wolf said. “It barely missed the woods.”

He said he ran to help, and saw two men walking out of the field.

“It was a man and his son,” Wolf said. ” They were flying from Wisconsin to Millersburg to spend the night.”

He said they had some injuries but appeared to be ok.

The Loudonville EMS transported them to the hospital.

The Ashland County Sheriff is investigating. 

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