Sunday, July 30, 2017

Arrow Aviation LLC: Cessna 172M, N1727V, fatal accident occurred August 11, 2017 at Candlelight Farms Airport (11N), New Milford, Litchfield County, Connecticut -and- Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N612DF, fatal accident occurred July 30, 2017 at Danbury Municipal Airport (KDXR), Fairfield County, Connecticut

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Windsor Locks, Connecticut
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


NTSB Identification: ERA17FA272
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 11, 2017 in New Milford, CT
Aircraft: CESSNA 172M, registration: N1727V
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 11, 2017, about 0930 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172M, N1727V, collided with terrain at Candlelight Farms Airport (11N), New Milford, Connecticut. The airplane was substantially damaged. The flight instructor was fatally injured. The student pilot and one passenger were seriously injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Arrow Aviation LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations part 91. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local, instructional flight. The flight originated at Danbury Municipal Airport (DXR), Danbury, Connecticut about 0835.

The passenger, who was seated in the aft seat, walked to a nearby residence after the accident to seek assistance. There were no eyewitnesses. A local resident heard the airplane's engine prior to the accident; however, he did not see the airplane in flight.

The accident site was located on an open field, about 1,000 feet northwest of the airport boundary. The wreckage was found in an upright, nose low attitude. All structure and components of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site. The nose landing gear separated during the impact sequence. There was no fire. The airplane was equipped with a fuel tank in each wing, and both tanks contained fuel.

The student pilot, seated in the left cockpit seat, did not possess a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) student pilot certificate or a FAA medical certificate. She was enrolled as a student at Arrow Aviation. According to her pilot logbook, she had logged about 15 hours total flight time.

The instructor pilot, seated in the right cockpit seat, held flight instructor and commercial pilot certificates with airplane single engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane ratings. His most recent FAA second class medical certificate was issued on May 21, 2016. He did not report any flight time on his most recent medical certificate application; however, he reported 3,900 hours total time to the FAA in October 2012. His pilot logbooks have not been located.

The single-engine, high-wing, four-seat airplane was manufactured in 1975 and incorporated fixed, tricycle landing gear. It was equipped with a Lycoming O-320-E2D reciprocating engine rated at 160 horsepower. The airplane was equipped with electrically-operated wing flaps and a stall warning system. The cockpit featured dual flight controls.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov





DANBURY, Conn. — A juvenile student pilot was at the controls when a plane crashed Friday morning in New Milford, killing the 57-year-old flight instructor and injuring herself and a passenger, according to New Milford police.

Anthony Morasco, of New Milford, was presumed dead at the scene of the crash, which occurred at 9:17 a.m. at the end of turf runway at Candlelight Farms Airport in New Milford, officials said.

Morasco, who was the co-pilot, was a flight instructor employed by Arrow Aviation, which owns the plane, a Cessna 172M, police said.

The female student pilot was not identified by name because she is underage, police said. The girl was trapped in the plane and suffered critical injuries in the crash, police said. She was extricated by the New Milford Fire Department and taken by LifeStar helicopter to Hartford Hospital , police said.

"Subsequent investigation revealed that the plane was being flown by a student pilot," New Milford police said i a statement.

A passenger in the backseat, identified as Peter Jellen, 44, of New York, was seriously injured, police said. But he was able to get out of the wreckage and walk to a nearby home, where he asked residents to call 911, police said.

That 911 call came in at 9:51 a.m., nearly 35 minutes after the crash, New Milford said. The resident lives at Border Lane and Green Pond Road in Sherman, near the airport property, police said.

Jellen directed first responders to the crash scene before an ambulance took him to Danbury Hospital, police said.

The plane had departed earlier from Danbury Municipal Airport, about 20 miles away, the Federal Aviation Authority said.

The FAA will investigate the crash, and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause, a statement said.

An investigator from the NTSB is scheduled to be at the scene at 8 am. Saturday to begin the investigation, a spokesman said. The crash scene has been secured for investigators, police said.

Arrow Aviation, which operates a flight school out of the Danbury Airport, also owns the plane that crashed July 30 just after takeoff in Danbury.

The pilot, Mark Stern of Redding, died four days after that crash and two passengers were injured.

The airplane that crashed in New Milford was the same aircraft that was stolen from Danbury Airport in a bizarre incident in 2005, NBC Connecticut said. A man and two friends stole the plane and took it on a joyride, landing late at night at the Westchester County Airport in New York, NBC Connecticut said.

Anyone with information on Friday's crash, or anyone who witnessed it, is asked to call New Milford police at 860-355-3133. 

Original article ➤ http://brookfield.dailyvoice.com




SHERMAN -- A multi-town response has been called to a deadly plane crash on the New Milford/Sherman Line that happened before 10 a.m. at Candlelight Farms Airport.

New Milford police said a student pilot, a juvenile female, was trapped in the plane and was critically injured. Police said she was extricated from the plane and taken to Hartford Hospital.

Police said the co-pilot, a flight instructor employed by Arrow Aviation; Anthony J. Morasco, was killed in the crash. The third victim, Peter Jellen of New York, was seriously injured, but was able to walk out of the wreckage, police said.

Connecticut State Police were also called to the scene. A spokesperson for the National Transportation Safety Board said an investigator would be on scene by Saturday morning to take over the investigation.

The FAA said that the plane that crashed is a Cessna 172M. The plane had departed from Danbury Municipal Airport and crashed at the end of Runway 17-35 at Candlelight Farms Airport.

The plane is owned by Arrow Aviation of Danbury, a flight school.

Arrow Aviation is the same company that owns the plane involved in the deadly plane crash in Danbury, July 30.

Senator Blumenthal issued a statement regarding the crash:

"My thoughts and prayers are with the victim's family and those injured in this tragic crash. I am alarmed by the number of small plane crashes that have claimed lives in recent months and years in Connecticut. I urge the NTSB to complete its investigation quickly and thoroughly so we can determine whether action may be warranted to strengthen safety measures for small aircraft."


Story and video ➤ http://fox61.com




NEW MILFORD — At the end of the gravel driveway to Candlelight Farms Airport, Nic Marsicano anxiously awaited word on the fate of his best friend, Anthony “Duke” Morasco.

Marsicano had heard a small plane crashed Friday morning, and Duke likely was in it.

“How’s Duke doing?” he asked each passing emergency responder. “How’s Duke doing?”

A flight instructor is dead and two people are injured after a plane from Danbury Municipal Airport crashed at Candlelight Farms Airport, officials said.

“Nobody’s doing that well up there,” one man answered. The rest just drove past.

Marsicano soon learned Morasco — a flight instructor and his best friend of more than 30 years — had died in a crash that seriously injured two others.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the plane, a Cessna 172, departed Danbury Municipal Airport around 8:30 a.m. and crashed about an hour later in a grassy area a quarter-mile from the New Milford runway.

New Milford Police Sgt. Lee Grabner said the flight appeared to be a training flight. He said one of the victims, though badly disoriented, was able to walk several hundred yards to a nearby home to report the crash, and was eventually taken by ambulance to Danbury Hospital.

Police found two people still trapped inside the plane. The pilot, a woman who has yet to be identified, was extricated and airlifted to Hartford Hospital with life-threatening injuries. The other person was the flight instructor, Grabner said.

Police have yet to release any of the victims’ identities, saying family members are still being notified. But friends of Morasco said he was the man who died.

Marsicano, who had known Morasco since the two were students at Western Connecticut State University, said he was an experienced pilot who had flown for nearly four decades and had occasionally given flight lessons.

Marsicano, who had flown with Morasco many times, said his friend was a kind man and a “phenomenal pilot” whose “aspiration was to fly for a living.”

“He was one of those guys who would do anything for you,” Marsicano said. “I will miss him greatly every day.”

When Morasco wasn’t flying, he was a well-liked, hard-working maintenance worker for New Milford, said former Mayor Patricia Murphy.

“He was one of those people who could fix anything,” she said. “Just a very bright guy.”

Morasco worked for the town for two stints totaling about 15 years, Murphy added. He later worked for a rehabiliation center in town.

The plane’s registration number, obtained through photos of the crash scene, shows the plane is owned by Arrow Aviation, a Danbury flight-training school that owned a plane involved in a fatal crash nearly two weeks ago.

Mark Stern, of Redding, died from injuries he sustained after crashing a rented Cessna near Danbury Municipal Airport on July 30. Two passengers were injured in the crash, which is still under investigation by federal authorities.

Preliminary results of that investigation showed Stern’s plane began to lose altitude shortly after takeoff and crashed in a wooded area near the runway. The accident happened just two weeks after the plane had received its annual inspection.

A woman who answered the phone at Arrow Aviation on Friday declined to comment on either crash.

“We’re not able to talk about it,” she said.

The Cessna 172 is a single-engine four-seater and is one of the most popular aircraft in general aviation for flight instruction.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal said Friday he is concerned by the crashes.

“My thoughts and prayers are with the victim's family and those injured in this tragic crash,” Blumenthal said in a news release. “I am alarmed by the number of small plane crashes that have claimed lives in recent months and years in Connecticut.”

Story and video ➤ http://www.newstimes.com



NEW MILFORD, CT (WFSB) -  A pilot is dead and two passengers were hurt after a single-engine plane crashed near an airport in New Milford on Friday morning, police said.

This is the second deadly crash involving Danbury-based Arrow Aviation in a matter of weeks.

Friday, the Cessna 172M aircraft crashed at the end of Runway 17-35 at Candlelight Farms Airport around 10:20 a.m., according to Federal Aviation Administration. FAA officials said the plane departed Danbury Municipal Airport around 9:45 a.m. 

National Transportation Safety Board officials said three people were on the plane when it crashed.

New Milford police said the male flight instructor, was pinned under wreckage and pronounced dead by responding paramedics.

The surviving female pilot was extricated and transported to Hartford Hospital by way of the LifeStar emergency helicopter. Police said she suffered serious life-threatening injuries.

The other surviving male emerged from the wreckage and walked several hundred yards to a random home to call for help, according to police. He reported that two others were with the plane. He was transported to Danbury Hospital.

"I saw a middle aged man, he was sitting on a stone wall and he was bleeding [on his head] and he looked dazed, just kind of staring off into space," said Maria Conte, an eyewitness. 

Conte said she didn't hear the crash. She stumbled upon officers tending to the victim.

"This man didn't look like he was too banged up," she said. "It looked like he was dazed, maybe concussed."

Police said he was able to get up on his own and get help.

"He was severely disoriented, all he could say was he was in a plane crash," said Sgt. Lee Grabner, New Milford police.

The victims' identities have not been released because their families have not yet been notified.

"We believe it was a training flight based on the appearance of where they were seated in the plane, but we don't know the exact circumstances like who had control of the plane or what caused the crash," Grabner said.

The cause of the crash is under investigation by NTSB and FAA officials. They confirmed it was indeed a training flight.

They said the plane may have landed in New Milford before taking off to return to Danbury.

"It's just a small private field that's used for personal flights and some instruction," Grabner said. "They also work with Danbury Airport."

Examining the registration numbers, Eyewitness News found that it appears the plane belongs to Arrow Aviation.

A plane crashed in Danbury on July 30, killing Mark Stern of Redding. That plane also involved a Cessna and the flight school.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal urged the NTSB to quickly complete its probe.

"My thoughts and prayers are with the victim's family and those injured in this tragic crash," Blumenthal said. "I am alarmed by the number of small plane crashes that have claimed lives in recent months and years in Connecticut. I urge the NTSB to complete its investigation quickly and thoroughly so we can determine whether action may be warranted to strengthen safety measures for small aircraft."

There have been a number of small plane crashes in Connecticut this year.

In April, Dr. Joseph Tomanelli was killed when the plane he was in crashed on Hanover Street in Wallingford.

Two men were killed in East Windsor roughly two weeks before that.

Pablo Campos-Isona of East Haven was killed when his plane crashed in February.

Anyone who witnessed Friday's crash is asked to contact the New Milford Police Department at 860-355-3133.

Story and video:  http://www.wfsb.com



One person was killed and two others, including a juvenile, were seriously injured when a Cessna 172M crashed Friday morning on a grassy runway, officials said.

The juvenile female, a student pilot, was flying the plane when it crashed and she sustained serious injuries, police said. The co-pilot and flight instructor, Anthony Morasco, 57, was pronounced dead on scene.

Another passenger, Peter Jellen, 44, of New York was seriously injured but was able to escape the crash and walk to a nearby home to ask for help, police said.

The plane crashed about 9:45 a.m. in the area of an airstrip on the Sherman line called Candlelight Farms, officials said.


The juvenile female, whose identity was withheld, was flown by Life Star helicopter to Hartford Hospital, police said.


The plane is owned by Arrow Aviation in Danbury, police said.


The National Transportation Safety Board said the organization is going to investigate the crash. Officials said the Federal Aviation Administration has been notified.


Mayor David Gronbach said police and first responders secured the scene. No one outside the airplane was injured.


The private airport on the border of Sherman sees a regular number of small airplanes coming and going without incident, according to Gronbach.


"I can't say there's been anything like this in recent memory," Gronbach said.


Story and video ➤  http://www.courant.com


NEW MILFORD, Conn. (WTNH) — New Milford Police report that the National Transportation Safety Board is heading to the scene to continue their investigation on Friday’s fatal plane crash.

According to police, a subsequent investigation revealed that the plane was being flown by a juvenile female student pilot and crashed north of the grass runway of the Candlelight Farms Airport. They say the student pilot was trapped within the airplane and critically injured.

Police say the student pilot was extricated from the plane by the New Milford Fire Department and flown by LifeStar to Hartford Hospital for definitive care.

Authorities say, the co-pilot and flight instructor employed by Arrow Aviation, 57-year-old Anthony J. Morasco of New Milford, was killed in the crash and presumed dead at the scene by EMS personnel. They say the rear seat passenger, 44-year-old Peter Jellen of New York, was seriously injured, but able to walk out of the wreckage to a home nearby where he summoned help.

According to officials the plane is owned by Arrow Aviation LLC of Danbury. They say the plane is registered as a 1974 fixed wing, Cessna 172M, with a tail No. N1727V.

Authorities say the Federal Aviation Administration, National Transportation Safety Board and the Connecticut Airport Authority have all been notified. They say the scene has been secured awaiting the arrival of the NTSB Investigative personnel.

New Milford Police ask that any witnesses or persons with information regarding this accident to contact them at 860-355-3133.

Police have not released any further details at this time.


Original article ➤ http://wtnh.com

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N612DF: Fatal accident occurred July 30, 2017 at Danbury Municipal Airport (KDXR), Fairfield County, Connecticut 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Enfield, Connecticut

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Cessna 616DF LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N612DF


NTSB Identification: ERA17LA261
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 30, 2017 in Danbury, CT
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N612DF
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 30, 2017, about 1025 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172S, N612DF, was substantially damaged when it impacted brush and terrain shortly after takeoff from the Danbury Municipal Airport (DXR), Danbury Connecticut. The pilot died 4 days after the accident, and the two passengers received serious injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was operated by Arrow Aviation LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the airport tower controller , the airplane lost altitude after takeoff while still over runway 26, a 4,422-foot-long runway. He then observed it "appearing to correct – it had assumed a more nose up attitude." It then began a left roll, followed by a "full nose up attitude, rolling to the left" before it lost altitude and impacted the ground.

An initial examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administrator (FAA) inspector revealed that fuselage came to rest upright in a nose down attitude, in a heavy brush area about 1,000 feet from the departure end of the runway. The left wing was partial separated from the fuselage and exhibited leading edge crush damage from the root to the tip. The outboard one-third of the right wing was bent upward and aft. The fuselage was buckled on both sides aft of the rear window, and the left rear pillar was crushed and separated from the roof. The nose section, including the engine, was crushed and displaced upward and aft. The empennage, vertical and horizontal stabilizers, rudder and elevators were largely undamaged .

Several brush branches were found severed at a 45-degree angle in the westerly path leading up to the airplane. Both propeller blades exhibited leading edge gouges and chordwise scratches. Fuel samples from both tanks was blue in color and absent of water. Oil was present in the engine, but the quantity could not be determined due to the canted resting position of the engine.

According to fuel records and statements from the operator, the airplane was fueled to the full level in both tanks on the afternoon of July 28. The accident flight was the first flight since that fueling.

Review of the airplane's maintenance records revealed that the most recent annual inspection was completed on July 21, 2017 about 17 flight hours prior to the accident. At that time, the engine had accrued 11,395 hours since new, and 656 hours since overhaul.

According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and helicopter. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued June 14, 2016 at which time he reported 582 hours of total flight experience.

At 1053, the reported weather at DXR included wind from 350° at 9 knots, the temperature was 23° C, and the dew point was 12° C.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov




Mark Stern, 63, passed away on Thursday in Danbury Hospital after succumbing to injuries sustained from a private plane crash on Sunday morning, July 30.  

Stern is survived by his wife of 30 years Karin; his son Bryan; daughter Alexis; stepdaughter Stacee; brothers; David, Richard and Glen; sister Donna; and grandchildren Vincent, Emily and Sarah.  He was preceded in death by his parents Leon and Miriam Stern.

Stern attended New York University and graduated from the University of Florida in 1976, then went on to earn his Juris Doctor in 1979 from Loyola Marymount School of Law. He worked at several law firms before founding his international law practice, Mark Stern & Associates, in 1986.

Stern was licensed to practice law in Connecticut, New York, California and Florida. He was a trial litigator, community leader, teacher and law enforcement professional.

An active volunteer in his community throughout his life, he served as the Wilton Fire Commissioner, a Culver City California Police Officer, Volunteer Florida State Highway Trooper and an auxiliary Police Officer at Fairfield/Eagle 1 Search and Rescue helicopter program.

He served as a Fact Finder and Arbitrator for the Stamford-Connecticut Superior Court and a Director of the Fairfield Bar Association. He was also a member and volunteered his time with dozens of other organizations focused on law enforcement, emergency management, law, commercial security and others.

He was a lifetime student and teacher who continued exploring new fields of endeavor, including becoming an experienced aviator flying both helicopters and airplanes.

His true passions were family, flying, and making a positive difference on those around him.

All arrangements are being directed by Spadaccino and Leo P. Gallagher & Son Community Funeral Home of Monroe.   

Stern’s celebration of life and memorial will be held Wednesday, Aug. 9 at 10 a.m. at the Norwalk Inn, located at 99 East Ave., Norwalk.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made by calling either the Wounded Veterans Relief Fund at (561) 855-4207, or Blackhorse 4 Heroes at (516) 449-9610 in honor of “Mark Stern and Family.”




DANBURY - A plane that crashed last week during takeoff from Danbury Airport lost altitude quickly and rolled to one side before crashing into a wooded area, according to a preliminary report released by federal investigators.

The report, released Tuesday by the National Transportation Safety Board, said the plane, a Cessna 172 Skyhawk piloted by Redding resident Mark Stern, 63, was “assuming a nose-up attitude” before it rolled to the left and spun to the ground.

Stern, an experienced pilot, died of his injuries four days later. Two other passengers, whom authorities have yet to identify, also suffered serious injuries, the report said.

Sources have said that weight could have been a factor in the crash, but an aviation expert who reviewed the preliminary results for Hearst Connecticut Media said that weight is only one of several variables that could have caused the accident.

Matt Reynolds, a former aviation accident investigator for the U.S. Navy, said the initial report could also point to a loss of power, cautioning that more data would be needed to make a determination.

“One of the most common, insidious and deadly situations is a power interruption shortly after takeoff,” said Reynolds, an aviation expert with Pennsylvania-based Robson Forensics.

The report said the plane had begun losing altitude while still over the runway and that the pilot appeared to be trying to correct its course.

Reynolds said the pilot might have pulled the nose up in an effort to maintain the plane’s air speed, but the aircraft might have stalled. In an aircraft, a stall occurs when the wings lose lift and can no longer support the plane.

“Any overcorrection or incorrect inputs leading to uncoordinated flight, combined with a stall, will result in a spin shortly after takeoff that you can’t recover from,” Robinson said.

Pilots are trained to recover from a stall, but the Cessna didn’t have enough altitude to perform the emergency procedure, Reynolds noted.

“Your best chance, if you’re at an altitude below 500 feet and you have a power interruption, is to make a forced landing,” Reynolds said.

The NTSB report states that the plane was full of fuel when it took off and that its annual inspection was completed July 21 - less than two weeks before the accident.

The report also confirmed that the plane was rented from Arrow Aviation and that no flight plan was filed with the FAA. Stern had a license to operate both helicopters and single-engine aircraft and had logged about 582 hours of flight experience.

Stern’s obituary described him as “a lifetime student and teacher who continued exploring new fields of endeavor, including becoming an experienced aviator flying both helicopters and airplanes. His true passions were family, flying, and making a positive difference on those around him.”

Stern’s flying experience included time spent volunteering as a pilot with Eagle 1, a search-and-rescue helicopter operated by the Stratford Police Department, the obituary said.

Stern, an attorney with offices in Norwalk, had also served as a member of the Wilton Fire Commissioner, as a police officer in Culver City, Calif., and as a volunteer trooper for the Florida State Highway patrol.

Stern was licensed to practice law in Connecticut, New York, California and Florida.

A full report by the NTSB likely will take more than a year to complete.


http://www.newstimes.com









Authorities have yet to release the names of three men whose small plane crashed on Sunday less than a mile from Danbury Municipal Airport. But family members said the pilot, Mark Stern, has died of his injuries. 

Family members said Stern, of Redding, was an experienced pilot. The family “asks for privacy at this time given the tragedy,” said a Stern family spokesman reached by phone Friday, adding an obituary “is forthcoming.”

The other two passengers have not been identified by local or federal officials.

The National Transportation Safety Board, which is investigating the crash, has not released any information, but Danbury Fire Department officials Friday described the crash scene as they found it some two minutes after they received the 911 call.

The plane, a single-engine Cessna Skyhawk, was found deep in brush up a hill near Miry Brook Road some seven minutes after it took off from Danbury Municipal Airport.


http://www.newstimes.com



DANBURY — At least one person remains in critical condition after Sunday’s plane crash near Danbury Airport.

Detectives with the National Transportation Safety Board have taken over the crash investigation from local authorities and were expected to remove the plane from the hillside sometime late Monday.

Three people injured in the crash remain at Danbury Hospital, authorities said. One person is reported to have life-threatening injuries, another is in serious condition and a third has non-life-threatening injuries. The names of the injured have not been released.

The plane crashed in the hills behind the city dog park on Miry Brook Road shortly after taking off around 10:30 a.m. Sunday morning.

Several sources told The News-Times that weight on board the aircraft might have been a factor in the crash, but NTSB officials have yet to release any information about what led to the accident. Agency officials did say the fuel tank was full when the plane went down.

Story and video ►  http://www.newstimes.com



DANBURY — Three men were injured after a plane crashed in a field about a mile from Danbury Airport Sunday morning.

The Cessna Skyhawk single-engine aircraft crashed on a hill behind the Danbury Dog Park on Miry Brook Road just before 10:30 a.m. after taking off from Danbury Airport for a local flight, said Stephen Williams, deputy fire chief for the Danbury Fire Department.

The four-passenger plane had been rented from the airport earlier Sunday morning and took off from Runway 26 behind the FedEx building on Backus Avenue, Williams said. The plane was heading west, but investigators do not yet know its intended destination.

Williams said the airport tower called 911 first, but authorities also received several other calls from witnesses walking their dogs in the park when the plane crashed down.

Within minutes, fire officials arrived and beat back brush to reach and rescue the three men from the plane. They were then transported to Danbury Hospital.

One of the men suffered life-threatening injuries. Another was in serious condition and was expected to stay in the hospital at least over night, Williams said. The third suffered minor injuries and was expected to be released from the hospital Sunday evening, Williams said.

Authorities were working on identifying the passengers and where they were inside the plane when it crashed. The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are also determining why the aircraft crashed, Williams said.

“It may have been a pilot error or a mechanical problem, but it’s still too early to determine,” Williams said. “They did have a full tank of fuel, so it doesn’t appear to be any type of issue like that. It’s going to take them some time to go through the mechanical of the airplane and figure out what happened.”

He added the pilot likely tried to land safely.

“I’m sure the pilot was doing everything he could to get the plane down as safely as he could as soon as he realized he wasn’t able to fly,” Williams said. “What caused the condition that he couldn’t continue to fly, I don’t know, but I’m sure he did his best to get the airplane down as best he could.”

The National Transportation Safety Board says on its website that it can take 12 to 18 months to determine the cause of a plane crash.

Police initially closed Miry Brook Road from Backus Avenue to George Washington highway in Ridgefield. But by 12:30 p.m Sunday, police set up a barrier at the Miry Brook Road and Backus Avenue intersection and directed traffic around the site.

“Our thoughts and prayers go out to the victims at this time,” Police Chief Patrick Ridenhour said.

Any witnesses to the crash had left the scene by 11:30 a.m. Sunday, but a few passersby stopped during their walks to see what had happened.

John Zahner, who lives on the Wooster School campus across from the crash, said he heard sirens from his house and assumed there had been a small fire. But when he, his three kids and their dog went for a walk, they saw the plane in the field.

“I never heard the plane come down,” he said. “A plane of that size you would expect a little more noise.”

The dog park will be closed until the estimated 3,000 pound-plane is cleared.

“It’s still pretty rough terrain,” Williams said. “It’s going to take us a while to investigate the accident and remove the airplane.”

Lt. Mike Sturdevant said the plane is expected to be removed on Monday.

Story and video ►  http://www.newstimes.com




DANBURY, Conn. — Three men were injured, one critically, after their rented plane crashed into heavy brush on a hillside just after taking off from Danbury Airport on Sunday morning, the Danbury Fire Department said in a statement. 

The airplane, a Cessna SkyHawk, took off at about 10:30 a.m. when the tower witnessed the plane crash and called 911, said James Gagliardo, fire department spokesman.

The Danbury Fire Department was dispatched to the area near the Danbury Dog Park at the intersection of Miry Brook Road and Backus Avenue, Gagliardo said.

Upon arrival, Engine 26 confirmed the plane had crashed in the field just behind the dog park, he said. Responders had to make their way to the crash site, which was located in heavy brush, Gagliardo said.

The three male passengers, who were not identified, were quickly extricated and transported to Danbury Hospital by EMS for treatment, he said.

One man was in critical condition with life-threatening injuries, and medical officials planned to transfer him to Westchester Medical Center via medivac, Gagliardo said.

One man was in "severe condition," he said, and the third was in stable condition with minor injuries.

The plane was reportedly rented from an operator at Danbury Airport, Gagliardo said. It was unclear where the plane was headed after taking off from the westbound runway, he said.

The investigation was turned over to the Danbury Airport Administrator, who is working with the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board to determine the cause of the accident, he said.

Police and fire crews were on the scene throughout Sunday afternoon, with emergency crews parked in the Dog Park area and along the fences.

The Dog Park was closed, but the roads remained open in the area. Onlookers and media were gathered near the Federal Express office at the corner, across from the crash scene.

The crash scene is just west of the airport, which is near the Danbury Fair Mall.

The 3,000-pound plane was still at the crash scene Sunday evening. It was in rough terrain along the side of the hill. 


http://danbury.dailyvoice.com



DANBURY - Three men were hospitalized when a single-engine plane crashed Sunday while taking off from Danbury Airport, officials say.

Fire officials tell News 12 that one person is in critical condition with life-threatening injuries. Another person is in serious condition, and the third suffered minor injuries. All three were taken to Danbury Hospital, but the victim with the most serious injuries has since been transferred to Westchester Hospital.

Authorities say the initial 911 calls reporting the crash came in around 10:25 a.m.

The plane crashed on a hill near the airport property, behind the Danbury Dog Park. A deputy fire chief says that first responders had to beat their way through the brush on the hill to make it to the plane and get the victims out of the wreckage.

The men were flying in a Cessna 172S Skyhawk. They had rented the aircraft Sunday morning and were heading west, although authorities have not yet confirmed their exact destination.

The identities of those who were injured have not yet been released. 

The Danbury Dog Park was closed following the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board and the airport administrator are investigating the cause of the crash. Officials say the plane had a full tank of gas.

Story and video ► http://connecticut.news12.com



DANBURY, Connecticut (WABC) -- Three people were injured when a small plane crashed during takeoff in Connecticut Sunday morning. 

The Cessna 172S Skyhawk crashed after departure from Runway 26 at Danbury Municipal Airport at 10:25 a.m.

The Danbury Fire Department says one person was critically injured, another was seriously hurt, and the third sustained minor injuries.

The Hartford Courant reports that the plane crashed in a field on Miry Brook Road near the city's dog park.

Responders had to blaze a trail to the aircraft then extricate the victims and bring them down the trail they created.

Mayor Mark Boughton said the city is awaiting the Federal Aviation Administration and that the dog park will remain closed.

There is no word yet on where the plane was headed.

The  Federal Aviation Administration will investigate and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the cause of the accident.

http://abc7ny.com




DANBURY — Mayor Mark Boughton tweeted Sunday morning that 3 people were injured following a plane crash at Danbury Airport.

Mayor Boughton goes on to say that all were taken to Danbury hospital after the plane crashed during take off.

Officials say that one person was in critical condition, one in serious condition, and the third had minor injuries.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the plane that crashed was a Cessna 172S Skyhawk that was departing from Runway 26 at Danbury Airport. 

The  Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board is investigating to determine the cause of the crash.

http://fox61.com




Three people are hurt after a plane crash at Danbury Municipal Airport, according to the mayor. 

Three men were taken to the hospital - one in critical condition and one in serious condition, according to officials on scene.


A spokesperson for the Federal Aviation Administration said that a Cessna 172S Skyhawk crashed after taking off around 10:25 a.m. 

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board have been called in to investigate.

The plane crashed in the area of Miry Brook Road and Backus Avenue. The nearby Danbury Dog Park is closed due to the investigation. 

Story and video ► http://www.necn.com




DANBURY, CT (CBSNewYork) — Three people were injured when a small plane crashed after taking off from an airport in southwestern Connecticut late Sunday morning.

The Cessna 172S Skyhawk crashed after departure from runway 26 at Danbury Municipal Airport at 10:25 a.m, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

“Appears they were departing and wasn’t able to maintain flight and the pilot crashed into the side of the hill,” Deputy Fire Chief Steven Williams said.

Three men were rushed from the wreckage to area hospitals.

WCBS 880’s Kelly Waldron reports the men had rented the plane from an operator at the airport.

Nobody on the ground was injured in the crash, according to Deputy Chief Williams.

The Federal Aviation Administration continues to investigate, and the National Transportation Safety Board will work to determine the cause of the crash.

Story and video ►  http://newyork.cbslocal.com



Three people are hurt after a plane crash at Danbury Municipal Airport, according to the mayor.

Three men were taken to the hospital - one in critical condition and one in serious condition, according to officials on scene.

A spokesperson for the Federal Aviation Administration said that a Cessna 172S Skyhawk crashed after taking off around 10:25 a.m. 

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board have been called in to investigate.

The plane crashed in the area of Miry Brook Road and Backus Avenue. The nearby Danbury Dog Park is closed due to the investigation. 

Story and video ► http://www.nbcconnecticut.com

DANBURY, CT (WFSB) -  Three people have been injured after a plane crashed at Danbury Airport on Sunday, according to officials.

Two people are listed in critical condition, according to Danbury Communications Officer, James Gagliardo, while a third passenger escaped with minor injuries. 


Firefighters said they received a call at 10:30 a.m. from tower dispatchers that the rented plane, a Cessna 172S Skyhawk, had crashed just after take-off into the heavy brush near airport property on Miry Brook Road.


First Responders extricated the passengers and all three were transported to Danbury Hospital. 


Deputy Chief Stephen Williams told Eyewitness News that a mechanical malfunction may have caused the plane to crash, but said the it is still too early in the investigation to make that determination.


Firefighters said a nearby dog park was evacuated and is expected to remain closed until the plane has been retrieved from the crash site. 


The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board is investigating to determine what caused the crash. 



Story and photo gallery ►  http://www.wfsb.com

DANBURY, Conn. — Three people have been injured after a small plane crashed during takeoff from Danbury Airport.

The crash happened around 10:30 a.m. Sunday.

Danbury Mayor Mark Boughton said in tweet that those injured have been taken to Danbury Hospital for treatment. He said he did not know the extent of their injuries.

The Hartford Courant reports that the plane crashed in a field on Miry Brook Road near the city's dog park.

Boughton said city is awaiting the Federal Aviation Administration and that the dog park will remain closed.

Story and video ►  http://www.lohud.com

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