Monday, June 5, 2017

Beech BE-95, N9411Y: Accident occurred June 26, 2014 at Jack Edwards Airport (KJKA), Gulf Shores, Baldwin County, Alabama

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N9411Y

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Birmingham, Alabama

NTSB Identification: ERA14LA324
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, June 26, 2014 in Gulf Shores, AL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/01/2015
Aircraft: BEECH 95 55, registration: N9411Y
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that there were no problems with the airplane’s performance and handling throughout the flight. He further stated that, after the airplane had touched down for the second time (witnesses reported that the airplane bounced after landing) and had slowed to about 30 knots during the landing roll, he felt a “shimmy” coming from the airplane’s nose area. The nose landing gear then collapsed, and the airplane slid on its nose until it stopped partially off the side of the runway. The airframe sustained substantial damage. According to one witness, the airplane’s approach speed was “excessive,” and the airplane landed in a flat attitude and then bounced. Another witness stated that the airplane touched down on all three landing gear, bounced, and then touched down a second time on the nose landing gear. Examination of the wreckage revealed overstress damage consistent with a hard landing. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s improper landing flare, which resulted in a hard landing.

On June 26, 2014, about 1645 central daylight time, a Beech BE-95, N9411Y, was substantially damaged during a hard landing at Jack Edwards Airport (JKA), Gulf Shores, Alabama. The private pilot and a passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. 

In a telephone interview, the pilot stated that there were no problems with the performance and handling of the airplane throughout the flight. He said that after the airplane had touched down for the second time, and had slowed to approximately 30 knots during the landing roll, he observed a "shimmy" coming from the nose area of the airplane. The nose landing gear then collapsed and the airplane slid on its nose until it stopped partially off to the side of the runway. 

A witness located at the airport's fixed base operator (FBO) provided a written statement. He said the airplane touched down on all three landing gear simultaneously, bounced, then landed hard on the nose landing gear, collapsing it. The airplane then skidded approximately 400 feet before it exited the side of the runway.

Another witness stated the speed of the airplane was "excessive" and that it landed in a flat, "neutral" attitude, and bounced back into the air. At that point, the witness lost sight of the airplane and did not see it touch down the second time.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane multiengine and single engine land. His most recent FAA third class medical certificate was issued on June 13, 2014. He reported 4,000 total hours of flight experience, of which 500 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.

At 1655, the weather conditions reported at JKA included scattered clouds at 3,200 feet, visibility 10 miles, temperature 30 degrees C, dewpoint 23 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.02 inches of mercury. The wind was from 230 degrees at 3 knots. 

The wreckage was recovered from the accident site and moved to the FBO. Examination of photographs revealed a separated nose landing gear, cut and torn front tire, crushed nose cone, and substantial damage to the fuselage and cabin areas.

Examination of the wreckage by an FAA inspector revealed no preimpact mechanical anomalies. He stated that his review of the airplane revealed damage due to overstress that was consistent with a hard landing.

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