Monday, May 22, 2017

Piper PA-28-181 Archer, N8304F, Dulles Aviation Inc: Accident occurred May 21, 2017 near Manassas Regional Airport (KHEF), Virginia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Analysis 

The flight instructor was working with the private pilot on his flight review. Before the flight, the pilot checked the fuel and observed that the fuel level in both fuel tanks was below the tabs and that the right fuel tank had less fuel in it then the left fuel tank. After departing and maneuvering in the local area, the pilot and the flight instructor returned to the airport, landed, then taxied back for another takeoff. After completing two traffic pattern circuits, on the third takeoff, the engine stopped producing power at 800 ft mean sea level (msl) on the upwind leg of the traffic pattern. The pilot lowered the airplane's nose, and the engine started running again. The flight instructor then took over control of the airplane as they started on the right crosswind leg for the runway, and at 900 ft msl, the engine lost power again. After deciding that the airplane did not have sufficient altitude to reach the runway, the flight instructor advised the air traffic control tower that they were going to attempt a landing in a field near the airport. She then checked the mixture, throttle, and ignition, without results, but neither she nor the private pilot attempted to switch from the right fuel tank to the left fuel tank.

During the off-airport landing, the airplane went through an electric fence and spun around about 180°. The nose landing gear sheared off, which resulted in substantial damage to the airframe. Examination of the engine revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation. Examination and draining of the fuel system revealed that the fuel strainer bowl, the line from the fuel strainer to the carburetor, and the carburetor float bowl were absent of fuel. The right fuel tank also contained only about 1 pint of fuel, whereas the left fuel tank contained about 3 gallons of fuel. Review of flight school records revealed that the airplane had flown 4.7 hours since it was last refueled. When asked, the flight instructor advised that she had not observed the pilot as he performed his preflight inspection, did not know when the airplane had last been refueled, and did not remember asking the pilot about the fuel quantity before they departed. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The flight instructor's and pilot's mismanagement of the available fuel, which resulted in exhaustion of the fuel in the selected fuel tank and a subsequent total loss of engine power. 

Findings

Aircraft
Fuel - Fluid management (Cause)

Personnel issues
Use of equip/system - Pilot (Cause)
Use of equip/system - Instructor/check pilot (Cause)
Decision making/judgment - Pilot
Decision making/judgment - Instructor/check pilot

Environmental issues
Tree(s) - Contributed to outcome

Additional Participating entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Herndon, Virginia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Registered Owner: Dulles Aviation Inc

Operator: Dulles Aviation Inc

http://registry.faa.gov/N8304F



NTSB Identification: ERA17CA186
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 21, 2017 in Bristow, VA
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-181, registration: N8304F
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor was working with the private pilot on his flight review. Prior to the flight, the pilot checked the fuel and observed that the fuel level in both fuel tanks was below the tabs, and that the right fuel tank had less fuel in it then the left fuel tank. After departing, maneuvering in the local area, the pilot and the flight instructor returned to the airport, landed, then taxied back for another takeoff. After completing two traffic pattern circuits, on the third takeoff the engine stopped producing power at 800 ft. msl, on the upwind leg of the traffic pattern. The private pilot lowered the airplane's nose and the engine started running again. The flight instructor then took over control of the airplane as they started on the right crosswind leg for the runway, and at 900 ft. msl, the engine lost power again. After deciding that the airplane did not have enough altitude, to make the runway, she advised the air traffic control tower that they were going to attempt a landing in a field near the airport. She then checked the mixture, throttle, and ignition, without result, but neither she nor the private pilot, attempted to switch from the right fuel tank to the left fuel tank.

During the off-airport landing, the airplane went through an electric fence, spun around about 180 degrees. The nose landing gear sheared off, resulting in substantial damage to the airframe. Examination of the engine revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation. Examination and draining of the fuel system, revealed that the fuel strainer bowl, the line from the fuel strainer to the carburetor, and the carburetor float bowl were absent of fuel. The right fuel tank also contained only about 1 pint of fuel, while the left fuel tank contained about 3 gallons of fuel. Review of flight school records revealed that the airplane had flown 4.7 hours since it was last refueled. When asked, the flight instructor advised that she had not observed the private pilot as he performed his preflight inspection, did not know when the airplane had last been refueled, and did not remember asking the private pilot about the fuel quantity before they departed.




A plane crashed along Bristow Road, Sunday evening, but the two occupants were able to walk away without any serious injuries.

Virginia State Police responded to a crash landing in Prince William County. The incident occurred May 21, 2017, at 8:35 p.m. in a field in the 10,800 block of Bristow Road in Bristow, Virginia.

“A Piper PA-28-181 began experiencing engine problems and made a crash landing in the field,” said Virginia State Police Public Relations Director Corinne Geller. “The aircraft struck a wire fence in its landing.”

First responders treated the plane’s two occupants for minor injuries at the scene. Debra Lea Varnon Schuldt of Annandale, Virginia, was identified as the pilot.

The plane’s passenger was Jeffrey Poindexter of Manassas. According to his wife, Deborah Poindexter, he sustained only minor injuries and is at home recovering.

The FAA and NTSB were notified of the incident. The cause of the crash remains under investigation.

According to Deborah Poindexter, the airplane had been totaled in the crash.

Original article can be found here: http://bristowbeat.com































AIRCRAFT:   1982 Piper PA-28-181 Archer 11    N8304F

ENGINE - M&M: Lycoming 0-360-A4M   S/N: L26539-36A

PROPELLER – M&M: Sensenich 76EM8S5-0-62

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE: TT 6024.0     TSMOH: 359.9           

PROPELLER: TT: 278.72         TSPOH 278.72                       

AIRFRAME:  6204.0                    

OTHER EQUIPMENT: King KR86 ADF, Bendix King KMA-24 Audio Panel, King KN 64 DME, NARCO ELT 10, King KX 155 Nav/Comm #2, Garmin GNS 430 GPS & Radio #1, King KT 76A Transponder       

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Aircraft ran out of fuel landed in wheat field, hit electric fence

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES: Damage includes but not limited to stabilator, rear fuselage, right wing, right flap, left wing, left flap. Left aileron, lower right fuselage, pilot window, firewall. Lower cowl, propeller, engine TDI               

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  Plane Care, 14235 Oak Spring Road, Hagerstown, MD 21742 (KHGR)          

REMARKS: Sold as is / where is; Field adjuster has possession of aircraft logbooks. Prior written permission required to inspect salvage and contact field adjuster to schedule viewing.   

Read more here: http://www.avclaims.com/N8304F.htm

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