Monday, May 15, 2017

Cirrus SR20, N8PY, Second Chance Wings LLC: Accident occurred April 10, 2016 at Caldwell Municipal Airport (KRWV), Burleson County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Second Chance Wings LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N8PY

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA151
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 10, 2016 in Caldwell, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/20/2017
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20, registration: N8PY
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

While in cruise flight, the private pilot experienced a vibration and noise that seemed to be originating from the engine. He reported that the engine rpm became erratic, and the airplane became harder to control due to the unusual vibration. As the pilot proceeded to the closest airport for a precautionary landing, the engine “seemed to be starting and stopping” or sputtering. The pilot reported that, before touching down on the 3,252-foot-long runway, the engine experienced a total loss of power. He flared the airplane above the runway and touched down at a higher-than-normal speed. The airplane bounced and settled onto the runway near its midpoint. Despite full braking action, the pilot was unable to stop the airplane, and it overran the runway before colliding with a tree and fence. An examination of the engine found that the exhaust pipe had fractured from the No. 5 cylinder; however, the reason for the separation could not be determined. No additional preimpact anomalies were detected with the engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The airplane’s multifunction display recorded the airplane’s flight and engine parameters. Data showed a large drop in exhaust gas temperature of the No. 5 cylinder consistent with a failure of the exhaust pipe. The data revealed that, during the landing, the engine was operating until just before the airplane came to rest when the manifold pressure increased to ambient pressure.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the No. 5 cylinder's exhaust pipe for undetermined reasons, which resulted in a partial loss of engine power. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s fast and long landing, which led to a runway overrun.

On April 10, 2016, at 1534 central daylight time, a Cirrus SR20 airplane, N8PY, exited the end of the runway after a precautionary landing at Caldwell Municipal Airport (RWV), Caldwell, Texas. The private rated pilot and three passengers were not injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to Second Chance Wings LLC and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated with visual flight rules flight following.

According to the pilot, while en route he started to feel an unusual vibration and noise that seemed to originate from the engine. The engine rpm became erratic and the airplane became harder to control due to the vibrations. He contacted air traffic control and reported the difficulty he was experiencing with the airplane. The pilot did not want to declare an emergency and air traffic control informed the pilot that the closest airfield (RWV) was 6 miles behind his current direction. As the pilot proceeded to the airport, he reported that the engine "seemed to be starting and stopping" or sputtering. The pilot did not see the airport quick enough for a straight in approach, so he circled the airport to land on runway 15. During the circle, the engine sputtering got worse. Prior to touching down on the 3,252-ft long runway, the pilot reported that the engine sputtered to a stop and the pilot then slipped the airplane to the runway. He flared the airplane and touched down with about 60% runway remaining (about 1,950 ft) and at a higher than normal approach speed. The airplane bounced and touched down again near mid-field. Using full braking action, the pilot was unable to keep the airplane on the runway and it overran the runway and collided with a tree and a fence.

An examination of the engine found that the exhaust pipe had fractured from the No. 5 cylinder. No additional preimpact anomalies were detected with the engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The airplane was equipped with an Avidyne Primary Flight Display and Multifunction Flight Display. Data recorded by these devices was downloaded and reviewed. On the accident flight, the No. 5 cylinder exhaust gas temperature (EGT) was consistently lower than the other cylinders, while the cylinder head temperatures were all similar. At 1525:48, No. 5 EGT was 1290° Fahrenheit (F) and at 1525:54, the EGT decreased to 93° F and continued to rapidly decrease. Between 1525:54 and 1532:30, engine rpm fluctuated between 2,080 and 2,400 rpm, fuel flow varied between 9 and 14 gallons per hour (GPH), and manifold pressure varied between 24 and 26 inches of mercury (inHg). Between 1532:36 and 1533:00, rpm stabilized about 1890, fuel flow varied between 6 and 8 GPH, and manifold pressure was between 21 and 23 inHg. Between 1533:24 and 1533:54, engine rpm decreased from 1,880 to 1,300, fuel flow remained constant at 2 GPH, and manifold pressure varied from 7 to 12 inHg. Altitude data put the airplane's touch down between 1533:42 and 1533:54. At 1534:00, engine rpm was 40, fuel flow was 0, and manifold pressure was 30 inHg

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA151
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 10, 2016 in Caldwell, TX
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20, registration: N8PY
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 10, 2016, a Cirrus SR20 airplane, N8PY, was substantially damaged during landing when it exited the end of runway 33 at Caldwell Municipal Airport (KRWV), Caldwell, Texas. The private pilot and three passengers were not injured. The airplane's right wing was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to Second Chance Wings LLC and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated with visual flight rules flight following.

According to a statement provided by the pilot, while en route the pilot heard loud noises of an unknown origin. The pilot requested a vector to the nearest airport and the noises began to sound like they originated from the engine. The noises began getting louder and the pilot began having difficulty controlling the airplane. Engine power was erratic as the pilot approached the airport. The airplane was at a higher than normal approach speed when it landed halfway down the 3,252 foot long runway. Despite maximum braking, the airplane exited the end of the runway striking a tree and a fence.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

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