Thursday, May 11, 2017

Beech C24R Sierra, N2074P: Fatal accident occurred December 20, 2015 in Winder, Barrow County, Georgia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Analysis 

The private pilot was conducting a personal cross-country flight. The pilot last fueled the airplane 10 days before the accident. Review of GPS data and fueling records revealed that between the last fueling and the accident, the airplane had been operated for nearly 4 hours. Several witnesses observed the airplane flying overhead as it neared the destination airport and then saw it impact treetops near a golf course. One of the witnesses stated that the left wing was low and that the airplane was losing altitude "very quickly" before it impacted terrain. Another witness reported hearing the engine "sputtering" before impact. The witness drove to the accident scene and saw fuel leaking from the airplane.

Examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or abnormalities that would have precluded normal operation; however, the examination noted alack of rotational signatures on the propeller. The right fuel tank was found intact and empty.

The witness's description of the engine sputtering as well as the lack of rotational signatures on the propeller suggest that the engine had likely lost power before the impact. Although the fuel selector was found in the left fuel tank position, it could not be determined what position the selector valve was in before the loss of engine power. It is possible that the pilot exhausted the fuel in the right fuel tank and was attempting to restart the engine from the left fuel tank when the accident occurred; however, based on the available evidence, the reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
A total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined because the examination of the wreckage did not reveal any mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. 

Findings

Not determined
Not determined - Unknown/Not determined

The overall number of fatal crashes of small planes fell about 5% from the year before, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. Here, a Beech C24R Sierra plane crashed at the Georgia Club golf course in Statham, Georgia, on December 20, 2015, killing the pilot.



The Wall Street Journal
By ANDY PASZTOR
April 2, 2016 5:02 p.m. ET


The rate of fatal accidents involving small airplanes in the U.S. declined slightly last year, despite years of escalating efforts by industry and safety regulators to dramatically reduce private aircraft crashes.

In the data released Friday by the Federal Aviation Administration, there were 11.3 deadly general aviation accidents per one million flight hours during the fiscal year ending last September, roughly 3% below the three-year average.

The overall number of such accidents declined roughly 5% from the year before, while total fatalities fell nearly 12%. Those statistics cover everything from home-built aircraft to single-engine, propeller-driven planes to noncommercial turboprops.

However, industry officials say 2016 will usher in regulatory changes that are anticipated to result in more dramatic improvements. The revisions, among other things, are intended to accelerate installation of enhanced safety systems on private planes and ensure that new pilots have the necessary practical skills and theoretical knowledge.

This year could “really be a milestone” for general aviation because the FAA is slated to complete far-reaching “changes in how we certify both pilots and airplanes,” according to Jens Hennig, vice president of operations for the General Aviation Manufacturers Association, the segment’s primary trade group.

Such strategic moves “are the types of changes that can make a marked improvement in safety,” Mr. Hennig, who is a member of various expert advisory groups, said in an interview Saturday.

The most recent results, which were circulated among government and industry experts and put out on the FAA’s website, still meet the agency’s internal performance benchmarks and document a slight improvement after what the FAA said were “relatively static” numbers stretching back to the beginning of the decade.

The modest improvement, however, highlights the continuing challenges in significantly reducing the frequency of fatal accidents for the approximately 200,000 private aircraft registered nationwide.

The goal for the government and industry is to slice the fatal-accident rate by 10% between 2009 and 2018. So far, private aviation has largely relied on the same type of consensus-based, voluntary safety initiatives that have helped U.S. airlines and the FAA eliminate fatalities stemming from commercial plane crashes over the past eight years.

Airliners world-wide last year had a rate of less than two major accidents per million flight hours, but without a single passenger fatality on a jetliner stemming from pilot error, aircraft malfunctions, weather or other accidental causes, according to the International Air Transport Association.

With the release of its data, the FAA stressed that various initiatives are under way in conjunction with manufacturers and pilot organizations to target the root causes of accidents.

Until the new rules fully take effect, however, safety experts will continue to emphasize pilot education to prevent accidents, particularly in which aviators stall aircraft or otherwise get overwhelmed in perfectly functioning planes. These “loss of control” accidents account for nearly half of all fatal crashes involving general aviation nationwide.

The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board recently identified reducing such crashes as one of its top 10 priorities, citing that pilots and passengers “die at alarming rates every year due to a loss of control.”

Industry and government experts have identified more than two dozen safety enhancements, ranging from training to hardware, to combat loss of control accidents. On a wider scale, the FAA and general aviation groups are beginning to use voluntary safety reports to pinpoint and try to mitigate budding hazards. General aviation accidents and incidents are now being incorporated into broader, industrywide databases “to identify trends and look for system risks,” according to the FAA.

At a “safety summit” between the FAA and private-aviation representatives in Washington on Thursday, Michael Whitaker, the agency’s No. 2 official, said the private-aviation segment’s fatal accident rate was beginning to decline, yet still more than 380 people died in general aviation crashes last year.

“While we still have more work to do,” said Mr. Whitaker, “government and industry are building on our momentum and commitment to improve general aviation safety.”

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wsj.com



NTSB Identification: ERA16FA075
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, December 20, 2015 in Winder, GA
Aircraft: BEECH C24R, registration: N2074P
Injuries: 1 Fatal.
This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 20, 2015, about 1430 eastern standard time, a Beech C24R, N2074P, was destroyed when it impacted trees and terrain in Winder, Georgia. The private pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The airplane took off from Jackson County Airport (19A), Jefferson, Georgia at 1359 eastern standard time. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight to Barrow County Airport (WDR), Winder, Georgia. The airplane was owned by Bryant and Bryant Aviation Inc. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Preliminary information from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the flight originated at Gwinnett County-Briscoe Field, (LZU) Lawrenceville, Georgia, earlier during the day of the accident and flew to 19A, where the pilot made one practice approach and then flew towards his intended destination of WDR.

Several witnesses observed the airplane flying overhead and watched as it contacted the tops trees adjacent to a fairway at a golf course. They stated the left wing was low and the airplane was losing altitude "very quickly." Also, the airplane impacted nose first and flipped 180 degrees, facing in the opposite direction. In addition, one witness stated the engine was sputtering prior to impact.

Examination of the airplane at the accident site revealed that the landing gear was down, and the flaps were in the full up position. The propeller showed no signs of power, no twisting gouges or nicks were present on any of the blades. Two propeller blades were bent aft near the hub and one propeller blade was straight. There was no smell of fuel on scene, however the left fuel tank was breached in several areas and the right tank was dented. Both fuel tanks were empty upon further examination. During the initial examination of the engine and airframe, there were no anomalies noted. Cable continuity was established to all flight control surfaces from the cockpit.

According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument airplane, which was issued on October 23, 2014. He also held an FAA third-class medical certificate, issued February 4, 2015. At the time of the medical examination, the pilot reported 7,000 total hours of flight experience.

The four-seat, low-wing, tricycle gear airplane, serial number MC608, was manufactured in 1978. It was powered by a Lycoming IO-360-A1B6, 200-horsepower engine, equipped with a three-bladed McCauley propeller, Model B3D36C429. Review of maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on June 10, 2015. At that time, the airframe had accumulated about 3,926 total hours of operation and the engine had accumulated 477 hours since major overhaul.

The airframe and engine were retained for further examination.
Billy K. Bryant, who died in the Beech C24R Sierra crash on December 20th, 2015. 

In November 2015, Bryant was given the Federal Aviation Administration’s Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award, a prestigious recognition honoring pilots “who have demonstrated professionalism, skill and aviation expertise by maintaining safe operations for 50 or more years.”




The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Lycoming Engines; Atlanta, Georgia 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Bryant and Bryant Aviation Inc:http://registry.faa.gov/N2074P

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA075 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, December 20, 2015 in Winder, GA
Aircraft: BEECH C24R, registration: N2074P
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On December 20, 2015, about 1430 eastern standard time, a Beech C24R, N2074P, impacted trees and terrain in Winder, Georgia. The private pilot sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to Bryant and Bryant Aviation Inc., and was being operated as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Jackson County Airport (19A), Jefferson, Georgia at 1359, and was destined for Barrow County Airport (WDR), Winder, Georgia.

According to a fuel log found in the airplane, the airplane was last fueled on December 10, 2015, with 28.5 gallons of fuel, at a Hobbs time of 3415.9 hours. It could not be determined if the fuel was topped off. Review of data recovered from a handheld GPS receiver revealed that the pilot then flew for about 2.5 hours later that day.

Further review of the GPS data revealed that on the day of the accident, the airplane initially departed Gwinnett County-Briscoe Field (LZU), Lawrenceville, Georgia. The pilot flew to 19A, where he completed one practice approach to runway 35 with a full stop and taxi to runway 17 for departure. He then flew locally for about 1 hour before flying to WDR. Over the 1.5 hour flight, he flew between altitudes of 800 feet to 4,000 feet mean sea level, except for the times of his practice approach into 19A.

Several witnesses reported seeing the airplane flying overhead and then impacting treetops near a golf course. One of the witnesses stated that the left wing was low and that the airplane was losing altitude "very quickly" before it impacted terrain nose first. In addition, one witness stated that the engine was "sputtering" before impact. The witness drove to the accident scene and observed fuel leaking out of the airplane.

PERSONAL INFORMATION

According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument airplane ratings. He held an FAA third-class medical certificate, issued February 4, 2015. At the time of the medical examination, the pilot reported 7,000 hours of total flight time. Review of the pilot's logbook revealed that he had accumulated 7,248.7 hours of total flight time, 34.5 hours of which were flown during the 30 days before the accident.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-seat, low-wing, tricycle landing gear-equipped airplane, serial number MC608, was manufactured in 1978. It was powered by a Lycoming IO-360-A1B6, 200-horsepower engine and equipped with a three-bladed McCauley propeller, model B3D36C429. Review of maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on June 10, 2015. At that time, the airframe had accumulated about 3,926 total hours of operation and the engine had accumulated 477 hours since major overhaul. At the time of the accident, the airplane had flown about 63 hours since the annual inspection.

According to the Beechcraft C24R Pilot's Operating Handbook, the airplane contained two 30 gallon fuel tanks, 1.5 gallons of which was unusable in each tank. Fuel consumption calculations using data from the Lycoming Operator's manual for the O-360 model, revealed that at power settings between 45 and 75-percent power, and between best power and best economy fuel flow settings, the airplane would have an expected cruise endurance of between 4.5 and 6.8 hours with full fuel tanks. The calculation was for cruise endurance only, and did not take into account fuel consumed during taxi, run-up, takeoff, climb, descent, or landing.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1435, the recorded weather at WDR included calm wind, visibility 10 statute miles, temperature 13° C, dew point -6° C; and altimeter 30.49 inches of mercury.



WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane came to rest upright against a tree, and the debris field was compact. The airplane had impacted treetops that were about 88 ft high and 193 ft before the initial ground impact point. There was no fuel smell at the scene. The debris path was oriented on a magnetic heading of 228°, and the airplane came to rest on a magnetic heading of 080°. Measurement of the elevator trim actuator corresponded to a neutral position. Cable continuity was established to all flight controls.

The left wing impacted the ground first, and the pitot tube was fractured off at the impact point. The landing gear was extended, and the flaps were retracted. The left fuel tank was breached at the leading edge, and there was no residual fuel in the tank. The left wing was forced into the side of the fuselage by impact forces, and the main spar was fractured at the attachment points. The outer half of the wing was torn between the flap and aileron.

The right wing leading edge was crushed upward and exhibited tree impact marks near the inboard side. The right fuel tank was empty and not damaged. The Hobbs meter indicated 3419.85 hours.

The aft fuselage was resting against a tree, and the empennage was partially separated about 5 ft from the stabilator. The stabilator was attached and exhibited tree impact marks. The forward fuselage and cabin section were crushed due to impact forces. The instrument panel was fractured in half, and most of the instruments had ejected out of the panel. The fuel selector was found in the left main fuel tank position. The fuel valve was disassembled and found to be partially in the left port, and it exhibited some impact damage.

The engine and propeller were crushed aft into the firewall. The propeller exhibited no rotational damage. Two propeller blades were bent aft near the propeller hub. The third blade was undamaged. The spinner dome was crushed on one side and between two blades.

The engine was removed from the airframe for further examination. Valve train continuity was confirmed by partial disassembly and rotating the crankshaft by hand. Thumb compression was attained on all cylinders.

The oil filter and oil suction screen were clear of debris. The spark plugs did not exhibit any anomalies. The fuel screen was clean and clear of debris. The vacuum pump was removed and examined. The coupling was intact and rotated freely. The vanes were intact. The engine-driven fuel pump was removed and examined with no anomalies noted. It was clean and clear of debris. The fuel pump was operated by hand and produced air. The fuel servo and fuel pump both contained about 2 teaspoons of fuel with an odor and color consistent with aviation fuel. The interiors of the cylinders were examined using a lighted boroscope, and no anomalies were noted. The propeller governor was removed and examined with no anomalies noted. The governor oil screen was clean and clear of debris. Both magnetos produced spark when rotated by hand. Oil was observed in the engine, and it was clean and clear of debris. The oil filter was cut open, and it was clean and clear of metal and debris. The oil suction screen was clean and clear of debris.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Division of Forensic Sciences, Georgia Bureau of Investigation, State of Georgia, conducted an autopsy on the pilot on August 3, 2016. The autopsy findings included "blunt trauma of the neck and torso."

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing on specimens from the pilot. The toxicology report stated that no drugs were detected in the urine, and no carbon monoxide was detected in the blood.
















NTSB Identification: ERA16FA075 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, December 20, 2015 in Winder, GA
Aircraft: BEECH C24R, registration: N2074P
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 20, 2015, about 1430 eastern standard time, a Beech C24R, N2074P, was destroyed when it impacted trees and terrain in Winder, Georgia. The private pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The airplane took off from Jackson County Airport (19A), Jefferson, Georgia at 1359 eastern standard time. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight to Barrow County Airport (WDR), Winder, Georgia. The airplane was owned by Bryant and Bryant Aviation Inc. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Preliminary information from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the flight originated at Gwinnett County-Briscoe Field, (LZU) Lawrenceville, Georgia, earlier during the day of the accident and flew to 19A, where the pilot made one practice approach and then flew towards his intended destination of WDR.

Several witnesses observed the airplane flying overhead and watched as it contacted the tops trees adjacent to a fairway at a golf course. They stated the left wing was low and the airplane was losing altitude "very quickly." Also, the airplane impacted nose first and flipped 180 degrees, facing in the opposite direction. In addition, one witness stated the engine was sputtering prior to impact.

Examination of the airplane at the accident site revealed that the landing gear was down, and the flaps were in the full up position. The propeller showed no signs of power, no twisting gouges or nicks were present on any of the blades. Two propeller blades were bent aft near the hub and one propeller blade was straight. There was no smell of fuel on scene, however the left fuel tank was breached in several areas and the right tank was dented. Both fuel tanks were empty upon further examination. During the initial examination of the engine and airframe, there were no anomalies noted. Cable continuity was established to all flight control surfaces from the cockpit.

According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument airplane, which was issued on October 23, 2014. He also held an FAA third-class medical certificate, issued February 4, 2015. At the time of the medical examination, the pilot reported 7,000 total hours of flight experience.

The four-seat, low-wing, tricycle gear airplane, serial number MC608, was manufactured in 1978. It was powered by a Lycoming IO-360-A1B6, 200-horsepower engine, equipped with a three-bladed McCauley propeller, Model B3D36C429. Review of maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on June 10, 2015. At that time, the airframe had accumulated about 3,926 total hours of operation and the engine had accumulated 477 hours since major overhaul.

The airframe and engine were retained for further examination. 

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