Monday, April 24, 2017

Cirrus SR22, N94LP: Fatal accident occurred April 24, 2017 near Meriden Markham Municipal Airport (KMMK), Meriden, New Haven County, Connecticut

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; 
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota 
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Joseph Tomanelli: http://registry.faa.gov/N94LP

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA167
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, April 24, 2017 in Wallingford, CT
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N94LP
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 24, 2017, about 1825 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus Design Corp. SR22, N94LP, impacted terrain in Wallingford, Connecticut during initial climb from Meriden Markham Municipal Airport (MMK), Meriden, Connecticut. The private pilot was fatally injured. The passenger was seriously injured. The airplane was destroyed. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight conducted in accordance with the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot had been flying out of MMK for several years. He previously owned a Piper PA-28-180, which he had recently sold, and had purchased the accident airplane about 3 weeks prior to the accident. Since that time, he had transition training from a flight instructor.

On the day of the accident, the pilot had decided to increase his proficiency in preparation for a planned trip to North Carolina. According to witness statements and security camera video, about 1740, the airplane departed the airport to the east. Around 1817, the airplane returned to the airport, and witnesses describe that the airplane was "fast and high" as it approached runway 18. The airplane then flared about 10 feet above the runway before it abruptly descended, and then touched down about half way down the runway. The airplane then bounced about three times and then became airborne once again. The airplane banked about 30° to the left, and climbed to an altitude of about 1,100 feet and joined the traffic pattern.

About 6 minutes later, the airplane was once again on final approach to runway 18. This time the approach appeared to be slower, but the airplane was again high. It again appeared to flare 10 feet above the runway, abruptly descend, and then touch down approximately half way down the runway. The airplane bounced about two times, the engine began to accelerate, and the airplane became airborne. During the climb, the airplane appeared to be at a higher angle of attack, and it sounded as if the airplane was "hanging on its prop." The airplane rolled into an approximately 60° left bank and descended while turning to the left. It then impacted the ground, slide across the ground while continuing to turn to the left, came to rest, and caught fire.

Examination of runway 18, revealed scrapes and S-shaped rubber transfer marks, consistent with an airplane touching down nosewheel first, in two locations that corresponded to the last two bounces that were observed by witnesses, and security camera videos.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane first made ground contact with the left wingtip, and after impacting and breaching a 30-foot section of the 8-foot-tall airport security fence, slid across a public use roadway, on an approximate 078° magnetic heading. About 115 feet later, it came to rest in the north bound travel lane against an earthen berm. Most of the airplane was then consumed by a postcrash fire.

Further examination of the accident site revealed that a 115-foot-long, and 62-foot-wide, debris path existed that began at the initial impact point, and spread out along the ground until reaching the point where the airplane came to rest. It contained the propeller, which was found buried beneath the shoulder of the south bound travel lane about 37 feet from the initial impact point; the engine cowling, which came to rest about 52 feet from the initial impact point; the left wing tip and a portion of the outer left wing panel, which came to rest about 81 feet from the initial impact point; and the top rail of the breached 30 foot section of airport security fence, which came to rest about 92 feet from the initial impact point. It also contained, smaller subcomponents of the airplane and portions of the airplane structure.

Examination of the airplane wreckage revealed no evidence of any inflight structural failure. The wing flaps were up, and control continuity was established from the remains of the cockpit flight controls to the remains of the ailerons, elevator, and rudder.

Examination of the propeller and engine revealed no evidence of any preimpact malfunction or failure. The three-blade propeller exhibited chord wise scratching, and leading edge gouging, with the gouges matching the spacing of the chain links of the airport security fence. Oil was present in the engine, and drive train and valve train continuity was confirmed. Thumb compression and piston movement was also confirmed on all cylinders. The spark plugs displayed normal wear with lean operations signatures, and there were no signs of carbon or lead fouling. The magnetos and ignition harnesses were intact, and both magnetos generated sparks at all the ignition leads. Fuel was observed in the fuel manifold valve, and the lines between the fuel flow transducer and the fuel metering unit.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Chart Supplements, MMK was publicly-owned, and was classified by the FAA as a non-towered public use airport. The airport elevation was 103 feet msl and there was one runway oriented in a 18/36 configuration. Runway 18 was asphalt, and was in good condition. Its total length was 3,100 feet-long by 75 feet-wide.

According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on February 1, 2017. On that date, he reported that he had accrued about 1,200 total hours of flight experience.

According to FAA and airplane maintenance records, the airplane was manufactured in 2005. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on March 13, 2017. At the time of the inspection, the airplane had accrued approximately 1,229 total hours of operation.

The recorded weather conditions reported at MMK, at 1833, included wind from 180° at 5 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, few clouds at 300 feet, an overcast ceiling at 12,000 feet, temperature 16° C, dew point 2° C, and altimeter setting of 30.15 inches of mercury.  

The wreckage was retained by the NTSB for further examination.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov



JOSEPH THOMAS TOMANELLI 
1961 - 2017

A devoted husband, father, grandfather, son, brother and uncle, as well as beloved physician, Joseph Thomas Tomanelli, age 56, passed away on April 24, 2017. Joe was born in Syosset, NY on January 8, 1961 and, along with his younger sister Holly, spent most of his childhood in Ronkonkoma, NY. He received his undergraduate degree from Cornell University, where he met his future wife Evangeline - his great love, best friend and partner for life. He received his medical degree from New York University School of Medicine. Joe spent his entire 27-year medical career practicing internal medicine in the Meriden/Wallingford area - most recently at Hartford HealthCare Medical Group - where he loved the community and the thousands of patients he had the privilege to care for. Raising his sons, Joe poured himself into encouraging, teaching, coaching and sharing his passions with them - knowing that they were the most wonderful gifts he would leave to the world. 

An avid fitness enthusiast, Joe was an accomplished skier, biker, swimmer and runner - having run the Boston and New York City marathons. He was also a faithful Jets, Islanders and Mets fan. Fulfilling a lifelong dream, Joe earned his pilot's license in 2005, and flying his plane was one of the great joys of his life - a joy he shared with his family. 

Joe will be remembered by all who loved him for his strength, determination and passion for life - his deep love of family, dedication to his medical practice, and his joy in fitness, sports and flying. 

Read more here: http://www.legacy.com

Todd Gunther, an investigator with the NTSB, speaks during a press conference on Hanover Street in Wallingford near Meriden Markham Airport, Tuesday, April 25, 2017. Officials continue to investigate the fatal plane crash that occurred Monday evening.




 A 21-year-old survivor of a small plane that crashed in Connecticut Monday was dragged away from the fiery scene by a Good Samaritan, according to a witness.

Meriden resident Dan Mercurio was on the scene in Wallingford when he saw several Good Samaritans run toward the wreckage, ABC New Haven affiliate WTNH reported.

Mercurio told WTNH that Daniel Tomanelli, who authorities said was seriously injured in the crash, survived due to a driver who stopped to help, pulling him away from the plane.

“He was bleeding from the head. It looked like his leg was broken--it was turned on the side," Mercurio said. "He was conscious and talking and obviously concerned for his father."

Mercurio's father, 56-year-old Joseph Tomanelli, was found dead on the scene, the Wallingford Police Department said in a press conference Tuesday morning. He was a well-known doctor in the area, WNTH reported. 

 One of the occupants of the plane is listed by the Federal Aviation Administration as being a licensed pilot, the NTSB said. It is unclear who was piloting the plane, police said.

After interviewing witnesses, the NTSB determined that the father and son were practicing touch-and-go landings when the accident occurred, the agency said in a press conference Tuesday afternoon.

Emergency dispatchers received a 911 call around 6:28 p.m. Monday detailing thick smoke in the area near the Meriden-Markham Municipal Airport, according to police.

Witnesses said that when they saw the plane touch down on the runway, it "appeared to be moving faster than normal" before it bounced twice on the runway and took off again. The plane then "went around the traffic pattern" and "came around again for a second set of landings," according to the NTSB.

During the second set, the aircraft touched down again, this time not as fast, and the aircraft "flared," which means it assumed a landing altitude about 10 to 15 feet above the pavement of the landing.

The aircraft appeared to drop before it bounced twice before it became airborne again and rolled to the left. It then impacted on the ground at about a 90-degree angle and crashed into the airport's security perimeter fence before sliding about 130 feet before coming to a rest on the roadway of Hanover Street.

After the plane came to rest, it caught fire, according to the NTSB.

David Tomanelli was taken to Yale New Haven Hospital with non-life threatening injuries that included at least a broken femur, police said.

The FAA and the NTSB are investigating the incident, including whether the physiology of either of the occupants, weather or the condition of the plane contributed to the crash.

In a statement to WNTH, the medical office where Joseph Tomanelli practiced, the Hartford Healthcare Group in Wallingford, said it was "shocked and saddened" to learn of the doctor's death.

"MidState Medical Center, Hartford HealthCare Medical Group and all of us at Hartford HealthCare offer our heartfelt condolences to Dr. Joseph Tomanelli, his family, friends, colleagues and patients," the statement reads. "We are incredibly shocked and saddened to learn of this tragedy – Dr. Tomanelli was a well-known and esteemed primary care physician in our community for years and will be tremendously missed. Our thoughts and prayers are with all who knew him." 

Story and video:   http://abcnews.go.com


Nick Tomanelli and father Joe Tomanelli of Cheshire watch as flight instructor Dave Drumheller teaches flight class at Meriden-Markham Airport in 2004. Joe Tomanelli was killed Monday in a plane crash, while his other son, Daniel, was injured.



Joseph Thomas Tomanelli, MD


Daniel Tomanelli

Flight instructor Tony Cresswell, at left, chats about what will take place on first flight lesson to students Nick Tomanelli, 12, and father Joe Tomanelli of Cheshire during a class at Meriden-Marham Airport in 2004. Joe Tomanelli was killed Monday in a plane crash, while his other son, Daniel, was injured.





WALLINGFORD, Conn. — As investigators try to piece together exactly what happened, a community is mourning the loss of a well-known doctor, Dr. Joseph Tomanelli.

“I immediately got out of the car the woman started running towards the crash. It was pretty intense the heat was pretty intense,” said Meriden’s Dan Mercurio.

He says Good Samaritans did what they could on scene, and calls came into 9-1-1 around 6:00 p.m. last night. Before Mercurio recorded the fiery plane crash on his phone, he says he helped search for 56-year-old Dr. Joseph Tomanelli, hoping he was not on the plane.

“A civil air patrolman came out of the airport and said gee maybe the father was thrown from the plane into the landfill,” said Mercurio.

Related Content: Roads closed in Wallingford as plane crash investigation continues

They searched, but authorities say Dr. Tomanelli died on board. His 21-year-old son Daniel survived and Mercurio said that’s thanks to another driver nearby.

Mercurio said, “He was dragging the son away from the plane and he was literally dragging him away from the fire.”

“He [the son] was bleeding from the head. It looked like his leg was broken. It was turned on the side. He was conscious and talking and obviously concerned for his father,” said Mercurio.

Now, the FAA and NTSB will search through the charred remnants of the plane. So far, they don’t know who was behind the controls when they believe the pair were practicing take-offs and landings. The plane went through a chain link fence on the east side of the airport. It crashed on Hanover Street. Mercurio said he thought of the Tomanelli family all night.

“My thoughts and prayers go out to the family. It such a horrible situation, I wish there was more I could have done,” said Mercurio.


Story and video:  http://wtnh.com




A doctor is dead and his son is seriously injured after a Cirrus SR22 plane crashed in Wallingford, near the Meriden-Markham Municipal Airport, Monday night.

The person killed in the crash has been identified as Dr. Joseph Tomanelli, 56, of Cheshire.

Tomanelli's 21-year-old son, Daniel, of Hamden, was transported to Yale-New Haven Hospital for serious but non-life threatening injuries. 

Wallingford police said Monday that the father and son were attempting to land in the Cirrus SR22, but officials from the National Transportation Safety Board said it appeared they were conducting touch-and-go landings. 

It was during the second set of landings that the plane bounced, became airborne, rolled to the left, came back down, passed through a fence, skidded into the road and caught fire, according to Todd Gunther, of the NTSB.

Authorities have not said which man was piloting the plane at the time of the crash. 

Wallingford police and Meriden police said they both responded to the scene, which was east of the airport, on Hanover Avenue just after 6:28 p.m. The airport is located near the Meriden-Wallingford town line. 

The small plane went through a chain-link fence before crashing on a berm on Hanover Avenue. The aircraft was engulfed in flames, Wallingford police said during a news conference Monday night. 

The NTSB and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will be the primary agencies investigating the crash. The NTSB expects to be at the scene for around two days.


Story and video:   http://www.nbcconnecticut.com




MERIDEN, Conn. (WTNH)– Roads around Meriden Markham Airport will be blocked Tuesday morning as federal investigators try to figure out what caused a deadly Cirrus SR22 aircraft crash on Hanover Street, near that airport.


Authorities believe a father and son were practicing take offs and landings when the crash happened. The son survived, the father did not.


Heavy flames badly burned the Cirrus SR22 plane as that thick black smoke billowed into the air. Now, police say just after 6 p.m., a 911 call came in about it. The two went for a flight together and something went wrong.


Police say the Cirrus SR22 went through a chain link fence on the east side of the airport. Then it crossed over Hanover Street where it crashed.


Police say Cheshire’s 56-year-old Dr. Joseph Tomanelli was killed. His 21-year-old son Daniel Tomanelli, of Hamden, was rescued and taken to Yale New Haven Hospital, where he’s expected to be OK.


At this point, the Cirrus SR22 is just a pile of charred parts. But the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will be out here Tuesday morning investigating what is left.


It’s still unknown who was flying the Cirrus SR22 at the time it crashed. Police say Hanover Road, which is where the airport is located, will most likely be closed through the morning.


Dr. Tomanelli worked for Hartford Healthcare Group in Wallingford. Below is a statement from them on his passing:


MidState Medical Center, Hartford HealthCare Medical Group and all of us at Hartford HealthCare offer our heartfelt condolences to Dr. Joseph Tomanelli, his family, friends, colleagues and patients. We are incredibly shocked and saddened to learn of this tragedy – Dr. Tomanelli was a well-known and esteemed primary care physician in our community for years and will be tremendously missed. Our thoughts and prayers are with all who knew him.”


Story and video:  http://wtnh.com





WALLINGFORD, CT (WFSB) -  Federal investigators are looking into what caused a deadly Cirrus SR22 crash in Wallingford on Monday night.


Hanover Street near the Meriden-Markham Municipal Airport remained closed around 6:30 a.m. on Tuesday, 12 hours after the crash was reported.


According to police, 56-year-old Joseph Tomanelli of Cheshire died.


His 21-year-old son, Daniel Tomanelli, is recovering at Yale-New Haven Hospital with a fracture and a broken femur.


Police in Meriden released a couple of 911 calls they received following the incident. The callers described a smoky, fiery wreck to dispatchers.


Eyewitness News learned on Tuesday that Joseph Tomanelli was a doctor with Hartford HealthCare.


Hartford HealthCare released a statement about his death.


"MidState Medical Center, Hartford HealthCare Medical Group and all of us at Hartford HealthCare offer our heartfelt condolences to Dr. Joseph Tomanelli, his family, friends, colleagues and patients," said Shawn Mawhiney, director of service line communications, Hartford HealthCare. "We are incredibly shocked and saddened to learn of this tragedy – Dr. Tomanelli was a well-known and esteemed primary care physician in our community for years and will be tremendously missed. Our thoughts and prayers are with all who knew him."


An eyewitness captured images of the scorched plane moments after it went down.


Police said the pair had been practicing landings when the crash happened.


"I don't know if he was in training," said Diane Lebel of Wallingford. "He was instructing, so I can't really judge. But [it's] sad to have to hear someone has passed."


The Federal Aviation Administration arrived on the scene.


The National Transportation Safety Board is also expected to show up.


This deadly plane crash is the fourth to happen in Connecticut in less than a year.


The most recent happened in East Windsor less than a week ago. Two men were killed.


Before that, another aircraft went down in February in East Haven. One man died.


Last fall, a man was killed in a plane crash in East Hartford, near Pratt & Whitney. His instructor was hurt.



Story and video: http://www.wfsb.com




A father is dead and his son seriously injured after a Cirrus SR22 crashed near the Meriden Markham Municipal Airport in Wallingford. 


The person killed in the crash has been identified as Joseph Tomanelli, 56, of Cheshire.


Tomanelli's son, 21-year-old David, was transported to the Yale-New Haven Hospital for serious but non-life threatening injuries. 


The father and son were attempting to land, according to Wallingford Police. 


Wallingford Police and Meriden Police said they both responded to the scene east of the airport on Hanover Avenue just after 6:28 p.m. The airport is located near the Meriden-Wallingford town line. 


The Cirrus SR22 went through a chain-linked fence before crashing on a berm on Hanover Avenue. The plane was engulfed in flames, Wallingford Police said in a press conference on Monday night. 


Evansville Avenue on the north side at Baker Avenue is closed. 


The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will be the primary agencies investigating the crash.


Story and video:  http://www.necn.com





A Cheshire man who died in a plane crash Monday evening was a primary care doctor for about 3,000 patients.

Dr. Joseph Tomanelli, 56, was pronounced dead after the fiery crash near Meriden-Markham Airport. His son, Daniel Tomanelli, 21, was found several yards from the wreckage and suffered non life-threatening injuries.

Joseph Tomanelli had been practicing medicine for about 27 years, most recently as part of Hartford HealthCare Medical Group, which he joined in 2012. He had been working out of a primary care practice on Masonic Avenue in Wallingford, Hartford Healthcare spokesman Shawn Mawhiney said.

"We are incredibly shocked and saddened to learn of this tragedy," Mawhiney said. "Dr. Tomanelli was a well-known and esteemed primary care physician in our community for years and will be tremendously missed. Our thoughts and prayers are with all who knew him.

Tomanelli received his undergraduate degree from Cornell University and his medical degree from New York University School of Medicine. His postdoctoral training was at Francis Scott Key Medical Center in Baltimore.

A Federal Aviation Administration official said Monday that the ruined airplane was a single-engine Cirrus SR22. FAA spokesman Jim Peters said the pilot was doing practice takeoffs and landings when the crash occurred about 6:30 p.m. The pilot appeared to be attempting to land when the plane smashed through a chain link fence, crossed Hanover Street and struck a berm, bursting into flames, police said.

Daniel Tomanelli was found away from the wreckage, police said, but it was unclear whether he crawled out, was helped from the plane or was thrown. The FAA will investigate and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause of the crash, Jim Peters of the FAA said.

Jennifer Hall of Meriden, who lives near the airport, said she was at her son's baseball game when she saw a column of black smoke rising into the sky. She feared that her father's diesel shop, which is near where the smoke was rising, was on fire.

She rushed over, but found no problem. She then figured the smoke was from a plane crash.

"You know, in South Meriden, when a cop is doing 90 down Main Street, something's bad," Hall said.

She recalled another crash at the airport in the 1990s. In July 1994, two people were killed when their plane crashed in a field in Wallingford shortly after taking off from Meriden-Markham Airport.

The plane crash was the sixth in the state in the past year and the second in a week.

On April 18 in East Windsor, two people were killed when the Luscombe 8A they were in crashed soon after taking off from Skylark Airport.

On Feb. 22 in East Haven, a Piper PA-38 crashed during a training flight, killing one man and seriously injuring another. It was the second crash in five months for the flight school, International Aviation LLC.

On Oct. 6 in Plymouth, the pilot of a small, open-cockpit plane suffered serious injuries after crashing not far from a small airport.

On Oct. 11 in East Hartford, a Piper PA-34 Seneca owned by the flight school crashed on Main Street in front of military jet engine manufacturer Pratt & Whitney, killing one man and seriously injuring another.

And on May 11 in East Granby, a 1947 Piper PA-12 crashed near Simsbury Airport as it prepared to land. Neither the father nor his son in the plane was injured.
































MERIDEN – A Cheshire man was killed and his son hospitalized when their small airplane crashed near the Meriden-Markham Airport Monday evening.

Wallingford Police said Joseph Tominelli died in the crash and his son, David, 21 was taken to Yale-New Haven Hospital. Daniel Tominelli is said to have non-life threatening injuries.

The crash happened around 6:25 p.m. Monday near the Meriden and Wallingford municipal line. The single-engine plane went down about 100 feet from the runway, authorities said.

Reports said the pilot was making an attempt to land, but authorities have not said which of the men was at the controls.

Meriden and Wallingford police and rescue officials responded to the scene, closing off roads. The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board were en route to take over the investigation, which was expected to last into the night.

Two people were killed last week when a small plane crashed near Skylark Airport in East Windsor. The victims of that crash were identified Monday as 61-year-old Robert Plourde, of Ellington, and 51-year-old George Janssen II, of Vernon.

Original article can be found here:  https://www.rep-am.com



WALLINGFORD, Conn. (WTNH) — One person has died and another has been injured in a plane crash in Wallingford on Monday night.

Wallingford Police say 56-year old Joseph Tomanelli of Cheshire died in Monday night’s plane crash at the scene. His son, Daniel, 21, also of Cheshire, was also in the plane and was taken to Yale-New Haven Hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

Shortly before 6:30 p.m., Wallingford first responders were called to a plane crash in their town.

The plane crashed on Hanover Street, which has been blocked off. Meriden Police say Evansville Avenue is closed in Meriden.

According to police, motorists can expect Hanover Street to be closed for sometime.

It is also near the Meriden Markham Municipal Airport, according to a tweet from New Haven Fire Fighter Frank Ricci.

Officials believe the plane was trying to land at the airport when it crashed.

Wallingford Police confirm the Federal Aviation Administration and the NTSB  are responding to the accident.

Story and video:  http://wtnh.com



A Cheshire man was killed and his son injured when their Cirrus SR22 crashed on Hanover Street adjacent to Meriden-Markham Airport Monday evening, authorities said.

Joseph T. Tomanelli, 56, died in the crash and his son Daniel, 21, was injured and hospitalized with non life-threatening injuries, Wallingford police Deputy Chief Marc Mikulski said Monday night. Tomanelli is a physician with an office in Wallingford.

A Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Jim Peters said the Cirrus SR22 was doing practice takeoffs and landings when the crash occurred about 6:30 p.m.

The Cirrus SR22 appeared to be attempting to land when it crashed through a chain link fence, crossed Hanover Street and struck a berm, bursting into flames, police said.

Daniel Tomanelli was found yards from the wreckage, Mikulski said. It was unclear whether he crawled out, was helped from the plane or was thrown.

Hanover Street in Wallingford and Evansville Avenue in Meriden will remain closed as authorities investigate, Mikulski said.

Meriden Mayor Kevin Scarpati said Meriden fire and police crews were assisting Wallingford police and firefighters.

The FAA will investigate and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause of the crash, Jim Peters of the FAA said.

Jennifer Hall of Meriden, who lives near the airport, said she was at her son's baseball game when she saw a column of black smoke rising into the sky. She feared her father's diesel shop, which is near where the smoke was rising, was on fire.

She rushed over, but found no problem. She then figured the smoke was from a plane crash.

"You know in South Meriden when a cop is doing 90 down Main Street, something's bad," Hall said.

She recalled another crash at the airport in the 1990s. In July 1994 two people were killed when their plane crashed in a field in Wallingford shortly after taking off from Meriden-Markham Airport.

Story and video:  http://www.courant.com

6 comments:

gretnabear said...

Registration History 03-Apr-2017 TOMANELLI JOSEPH OCEAN ISLE BEACH NC

mouser485 said...

ANOTHER CR22 crash ?? I used to really like these planes but incidents or accidents involving this aircraft seem to be very common. Is it just that there are a lot of them ? Maybe the training with this aircraft is inadequate? I've personally never flown one, I'm just a 172/182 pilot so not sure how different this aircraft would be but tired of reading about the accidents.

Prayers to the family.

Anonymous said...

Cirrus aircraft are not forgiving. They market the parachute as a safety feature but in reality, the chute is there for a lack of spin recovery. Not a comforting flight characteristic for any small GA aircraft. The bonanza was the first "unsafe high performance aircraft" but it is now the cirrus. The only difference is that the bonanza is a great and proven airframe. Cirrus aircraft started as a kit airplane and bought them all back when they became a mainstream company. What does that say for their confidence in reliability?

Mr Abdi said...

First of all, thoughts and prayers to the family. I'm a Cirrus pilot with a commercial rating. At this time we can only speculate, but I agree with anon in general that Cirrus are not as forgiving. Cirrus and Bonanzas (your example) are high performance aircraft with significantly faster approach speeds than your typical trainer. If I'd have to guess, this particular accident was potentially due to a high approach speed.

Respectfully, from my limited research, the most compelling argument for high accident rates in bonanzas and Cirrus were due to low time pilots with money moving up to high performance aircraft. In that vein, I wouldn't blame a 747 for being dangerous compared to a trainer even though it's vastly "less forgiving".

Part of my Cirrus specific training (for insurance) was on the use of the parachute. It wasn't advertised as a 'get out of all situations' device at all. They were very clear on the envelope of when it can be used. The anon commenter is incorrect in saying that it is only there for spin recovery; that's only half of the story. Cirrus parachute (CAPS/BRS) system has saved 373 lives so far, not just getting out of a spin.

The cirrus website is pretty clear: "THE CHUTE WILL DO ITS JOB, IF YOU DO YOURS.
CAPS is a truly remarkable safety innovation. But every new and innovative device requires training to master. CAPS is about more than just pulling a handle. It takes training and a safety-first mindset to make CAPS deployment an instinctual act in situations where you have lost control of the airplane. To support our pilot community, we have developed a wide range of reference materials and training resources. That is why we recommend recurrent training that includes CAPS deployment scenarios as an area of focus every twelve months."

John Darke, Sr. said...

Very sad ending to a fellow pilots love affair with his plane. Through the photos provided it appears clear that the father wanted the sons to learn to fly and share his enthusiasm.

It is difficult to imagine how this accident came about. Airplanes are not difficult to fly but also they are unforgiving in situations where the limits are exceeded. In my view there are way to many accidents that did not have to happen. Yes, some are mechanical failure, but quite rare. Pilot error is most often the contributing factor whether it be an engine out, flying into IMC and lacking the training to recover, or misjudging or underestimating the performance criteria of the aircraft. Better training is needed in preparing for the unexpected. Not all pilots have the same basic abilities, but proper and recurring training can clearly eliminate a lot of these accidents.

Anonymous said...

Agreed, training is a big part of improving the safety margin in GA. Scenario based training is about as good as it gets to prepare pilots for real world emergencies. Now more than ever, private pilots are transitioning into high performance turbine aircraft capable of true air speeds greater than 300 kts. Typically but not always, the faster the aircraft the less chances a pilot has to make mistakes. If a pilot does, they will pay for it. The bonanza history stems from many reasons including lack of training. The 36 has a club seating arrangement in the rear of the aircraft which is behind the CG. Burning fuel makes the CG move aft. A unsuspecting pilot that was a little tail heavy in the beginning, will be very tailbheavy during landing. They all have their quirks. People just need to focus on safety and not just passing the ride. This is an unfortunate event that no person wants to read about. Prayers to their families and friends.