Monday, February 27, 2017

Cessna T310Q, N1246G: Fatal accident occurred February 27, 2017 near Riverside Municipal Airport (KRAL), Riverside County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Riverside, California 
Continental Motors, Inc.; Mobile, Alabama 
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N1246G 

NTSB Identification: WPR17FA066
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, February 27, 2017 in Riverside, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA T310Q, registration: N1246G
Injuries: 3 Fatal, 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 27, 2017, about 1641 Pacific standard time, a Cessna T310Q, N1246G, was destroyed and consumed by postcrash fire during a collision with a residential area following the airplane's departure from Riverside Municipal Airport (RAL), Riverside, California. The airline transport pilot and three passengers were fatally injured and two passengers received serious injuries. The personal flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight that departed RAL at 1640, and was destined for Norman Y. Mineta Airport San Jose International Airport (SJC), San Jose, California. 

According to witnesses, the pilot and passengers indicated they were returning to their home in SJC at the conclusion of a brief stay in Southern California. The pilot completed a walk-around inspection of the airplane before boarding the flight with the passengers. He started the right engine, and then attempted to start the left engine. After several unsuccessful attempts, the left engine started, and the pilot contacted air traffic control (ATC). A preliminary review of ATC audio revealed that the controller issued an IFR clearance to the pilot multiple times before he repeated the instructions back to the controller correctly. Witnesses that were listening to the pilot's communications with ATC reported that the pilot required progressive taxi instructions to runway 09, the departure runway. Once the pilot reached the runway, the controller read the departure clearance to the pilot, verbatim. After an uneventful runway departure, the airplane began a left turn as it entered the clouds. A portion of the airplane's final moments of flight were captured by a surveillance video, which showed the airplane descend towards the ground in a slight left wing low attitude. The airplane disappeared behind a residence, which was immediately followed by the presence of fire and smoke.

The airplane came to rest in a residential area approximately 1 nautical mile northeast of RAL. The initial impact point (IIP) was identified by a broken chimney and a section of airframe located on the roof of a house. An intermediate impact point was marked by an adjacent house, which was consumed by fire, and set about 50 feet forward of the IIP. The main wreckage, comprised of the aircraft cabin, both engines, portions of the left and right wings, and the left propeller, was found in a bedroom on the southwestern end of a house about 100 feet beyond the IIP. Various sections of the empennage, fuselage, and wings were distributed along the debris path from the IIP to the main wreckage and oriented on a heading of about 345 degrees magnetic. Left wing fragments were distributed throughout the front lawn of a house 75 feet forward of the main wreckage. The left auxiliary tank and a portion of the left main tank came to rest 100 feet beyond the main wreckage on the lawn of another residence. A section of the left main tank was found 200 feet forward of the main wreckage and co-located with the left aileron.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.





 Cessna T310Q (N1246G) taken on Friday, February 24th, 2017 at the Riverside Municipal Airport (KRAL).


One of two women who survived a plane crash in a Riverside neighborhood last week has died of her injuries, according to her family.

Joanne Stacey Pierce, 46, had been hospitalized for more than a week, and doctors had treated her for severe burns to more than 90% of her body. She also had both legs amputated.

On Tuesday, her injuries became too overwhelming, said her husband, Richard Pierce. The San Jose mother was surrounded by her family as she took her last breaths.

“The burns were too much,” he told The Times on Wednesday. “We are devastated.”

Joanne Stacey Pierce was one of five people aboard a Cessna T310Q on Feb. 27 when it crashed into a Riverside neighborhood shortly after takeoff. Her 67-year-old mother, Dana Hijazi; 83-year-old stepfather, Nouri Hijazi; and family friend Adine Ferales, 22, were killed in the crash. Ferales’ mother, Silvia Ferales, survived the crash, along with Pierce.

The group was returning to San Jose after watching Pierce’s daughter, Brooke, in a cheerleading competition at Disney’s California Adventure in Anaheim, KPIX-TV Channel 5 reported. Pierce’s daughter returned home with friends and was not a passenger on the aircraft.

Richard Pierce told the Bay Area television news station that he had begged his wife to take another flight before takeoff.

Delmy Pennington, co-owner of the D&D Airport Cafe at Riverside Municipal Airport, said she saw the plane struggling to take off before delaying its departure amid heavy rain. After the rain stopped, the private plane took off. But Pennington said she was worried because the back of the plane was shaking as it left the ground.

The plane crashed about 4:40 p.m., causing a large fire that destroyed at least one home and damaged several others.

Joanne Stacey Pierce was ejected from the plane and pulled by firefighters from a bedroom window, her husband told the TV station.

A GoFundMe account was created to help her family raise money to pay for medical bills and funeral expenses.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the cause of the crash. The plane was registered to Pierce’s stepfather, Nouri Hijazi.

Story and video:  http://www.latimes.com



Cessna T310Q, N1246G



SAN JOSE (CBS SF) – Richard Pierce has kept a constant vigil at his wife’s bedside since she was pulled from the flaming wreckage of a plane crash in Riverside.

It’s a vigil filled with hopes and prayers.

“I’m terrified that she won’t make it,” he told KPIX 5. “But I’m putting all my faith in God and I believe she is going to pull through and we’re going to have a home.”

It has been week since firefighters pulled Joanne Stacey Pierce through a bedroom window after she was ejected from a private plane carrying and her parents and two other family friends that crash into a Riverside neighborhood shortly after takeoff.

The group was returning to San Jose from watching Pierce’s daughter, Brooke, take part in a cheerleading competition.

She suffered third-degree burns over 90 percent of her body and underwent surgery. Both her legs have been amputated and she has yet to begin to talk.

Her mother 67-year-old Dana Hijazi was killed along with her stepfather 83-year-old Nouri Hijazi and family friend 22-year-old Adine Ferales.

Another family friend – Adine’s mother Sylvia Fareles — was found on the lawn near the wreckage. Neighbors helped firefighters to pull her across the street, away from the burning homes. She was being treated for possible airway burns.


Story and video: http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com


Dana Hijazi and Stacey Pierce

Pictured is Adine Farelas, 22, who died Monday evening in the crash of a Cessna T310Q plane in Riverside.

Adine Farelas




Clues ranging from the trail of smoke from a small plane as it plunged to earth to the two failed attempts to start its engine before takeoff will be examined as investigators piece together what happened to the twin-engine Cessna 310 that crashed in a Riverside neighborhood this week, experts said Wednesday, March 1.

They said it’s likely a combination of factors — among the possibilities: mechanical failure, weather and the human factor — will be shown to have contributed to the accident that took three lives and left two other people in critical condition.

“All aircraft accidents are the result of more than one thing. All of them,” said Tom Anthony, director of aviation and safety security at USC. “There are a cascade of things that come together to cause an accident.”

In more than 60 percent of accidents, one of the causes is attributed to human error, Anthony said.

National Transportation Safety Board investigators have said it could be 15 to 18 months before their investigation reaches a conclusion.

As for the plane involved, according to Federal Aviation Administration records, it was registered to San Jose resident Nouri Hijazi. The twin-engine model had been built in 1974.

However, experts do not consider the fact that it is more than 40 years old to be alarming.

“Many of the airplanes flying around in the sky are not new,” said Holly Inaba, a pilot, flight instructor and contract course coordinator in USC’s aviation program. “And the fact that it is older is not an extraordinary factor.”

Inaba said the Cessna 310 has a reputation for being a relatively safe model.

“It’s a typical twin-engine airplane,” said Bill Waldock, professor of behavioral and safety science at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott, Ariz.



And he said the Cessna 310’s accident record is roughly average among popular twin-engine planes people fly in the U.S.



The planes were built between 1954 and 1981. During that time, Waldock said about 6,300 individual airplanes were produced. That compares to about 6,700 Beechcraft Barons and 5,000 Piper Seneca PA34s.



Citing NTSB’s data base, Waldock said that from 1982 to today there have been 600 accidents involving Cessna 310s, 184 of them fatal. That compares to 779 Baron accidents, 291 of them fatal, and 427 Seneca accidents, 121 of which were fatal, during the same period, he said.

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“That’s a favorite plane of small businesses and families and so on,” said Glenn Winn, a USC instructor. “It’s a relatively safe airplane.”



Inaba characterized the aircraft as “a pretty nice, normal, fairly docile aircraft.”

For a small airplane, with its two engines it has a lot of get up and go. It can cruise at 200 mph.

“It’s nice to have an extra engine,” Waldock said. “But it’s also a little more complicated to fly — particularly if you lose an engine.”

Barry Gregory, a 72-year-old Perris resident, who said he’s been flying since he was 21, said that is potentially disastrous.

“Losing an engine in a twin is the worst-case scenario,” he said. In a Cessna 310, he said, “It’s going to take you right to the ground.”

That’s one possibility investigators are exploring, experts said.

Some saw it as alarming, the reports that not once, but twice, the pilot tried and failed to start the engine at Riverside Municipal Airport. Not everyone agrees with that, though. Kurt Knepper, an Orange County aviation attorney and regional vice president for the California Pilots Association, said failed starts aren’t particularly unusual.

Others were concerned about the eyewitness report of the Cessna rocking back and forth, front to back, as it accelerated on takeoff.

Winn said the various reports suggest the possibility of engine failure.

Anthony said such a failure wouldn’t be crippling once the plane reached flying altitude.

“On takeoff, it becomes critical because you have one side puling and one side dragging,” he said.

It doesn’t help, said Daniel Prather, chairman of aviation science at California Baptist University in Riverside, that takeoff is one of those times in flight — the other being landings — when aircraft are particularly vulnerable.

“It’s a very critical time and a necessary time for all systems to be functioning normally.” Prather said.

Experts said it could have been something else.

Knepper said what caught his attention was the trail of smoke drifting from the aircraft in one of the crash videos. That, he said, could suggest that a fuel line broke, sparking a fire and triggering the rapid descent.

“Or did the occupants get overcome by smoke?” Knepper asked. “Fire is one that everyone worries about because, if you have fire on board, there is no way to get rid of it, beyond getting the plane down.”

Then, of course, there was a storm that day. The flying party reportedly waited for a break in the rain, then dashed out to the plane. Winn said he believes weather played a role.

Experts said investigators will look into a host of other things, too, such as how well the plane was maintained, how much it weighed on takeoff, how the weight was distributed, and other potential mechanical problems.

In any event, Prather said the crash shook up his students at Cal Baptist, who train at Riverside Municipal Airport.

“It is a wake-up call for our students,” he said. “It hits home when something like this happens at your local airport.”




The fire commanders at the scene of the airplane crash Monday in Riverside had to make a decision: Did rescuers have a realistic chance of safely entering the home the plane hit and saving anyone as the flames burned fiercely?

Fire Chief Michael Moore said the flames initially were burning on the exterior of the house, so after a quick assessment, the answer was yes.

Two firefighters entered a front bedroom where there was “zero visibility,” Capt. Tyler Reynolds said. They used a thermal imaging system to detect body heat, but it was the moaning of a woman who was buried under debris that attracted firefighters’ attention, Reynolds said.

Two firefighters dug the woman out and handed her off through a window to colleagues.

A second woman who’d been thrown from the plane survived after bystanders helped her crawl out of the damaged home.

“We put our firefighters at risk and we put them in place because of saveable lives,” Reynolds said at a news conference Tuesday, Feb. 28. “They went in, they did what they were taught to do. . That is what you get from a fire department that is locked and loaded and ready to go.”

Firefighters received praise for saving lives and preventing the flames from wiping out the neighborhood.

“They helped minimize the property loss and more importantly than that, the loss of life . under very horrific circumstances,” City Councilman Mike Soubirous said at the news conference.

A statement from Riverside Municipal Airport, which first reported the crash, said: “We express our appreciation to the city of Riverside emergency response crews. Fire and police departments and also immense gratitude to neighborhood residents who volunteered assistance.”

Firefighters were well short of the amount of foam they needed to battle the fuel-fed fire - a situation Moore said he expects to be remedied next year.

He said each fire engine typically carries 10 gallons of foam to put out vehicle fires. Foam forms a blanket to seal off combustible vapors.

Firefighters had to run 5-gallon barrels of foam to the engine that was spreading the substance, Moore said. He estimated that firefighters had 40 gallons of foam when they needed 100.

But the Fire Department is purchasing a foam tender that can hold 2,000 gallons and is expected to arrive in 2018, Moore said. The approximate $500,000 cost will be covered by a grant. The city has to match 10 percent, Moore said.

Source:  http://www.mercurynews.com



RIVERSIDE — There was something wrong with the Cessna T310Q when the San Jose pilot first tried starting it.

There was side-to-side shaking when it finally climbed into the air from Riverside Municipal Airport Monday afternoon.

There was smoke reportedly trailing from the twin-engine plane before it crashed into a house, less than a mile from where it had taken off.

And now, with three people dead, one passenger badly burned, and another hospitalized after a dramatic escape from the wreckage, investigators will try and solve the mystery of what really happened — mechanical trouble, human error, difficult conditions, or some combination of all those.

The tragedy has hit San Jose hard: Returning home after a cheerleading competition at Disney’s California Adventure Park, two of the contestants’ mothers — Stacey Pierce and Silvia Farelas — were aboard the plane piloted by Pierce’s dad, retired tech veteran Nouri Hijazi. He, along with his wife, Dana, perished when the plane crashed into a home. Farelas, who crawled to safety, lost her oldest daughter, Adine. And though the young cheerleaders were spared, having taken a bus back home, Pierce was badly burned and has been hospitalized in Southern California.

The National Transportation Safety Board says it could be as long as 18 months before a final report on the cause of the crash is released. But based on witness reports, a brief press conference by the NTSB and informed speculation by aviation experts, here are some of the areas where investigators will probably focus:

HUMAN ERROR

While Hijazi, the presumed pilot (NTSB investigator Stephen Stein would not say who was flying the plane), was an experienced flier, according to friends, he was also 83 years old. That factor — along with his flight records, history and credentials — will surely be considered.

Experts say that while a plane crash is usually caused by a combination of things — mechanical failure, weather, etc. — it’s common for human error to be a contributing factor.

“All aircraft accidents are the result of more than one thing. All of them,” said Tom Anthony, director of aviation and safety security at USC. “There are a cascade of things that come together to cause an accident.”

Anthony said that in more than 60 percent of air accidents, one of the factors is the person in the cockpit. An airport cafe owner who served the five fliers said the group appeared to waver about whether to fly out Monday afternoon, but ultimately decided to press on. The witness said the pilot was clearly having trouble getting the Cessna to start, trying twice to turn over the engine while sitting at Riverside Municipal Airport. While that may seem to a big red flag, Kurt Knepper, an Orange County aviation attorney and regional vice president for the California Pilots Association, said failed starts aren’t particularly unusual.

Friends described Hijazi as “an extremely experienced pilot” and said flying “was his hobby, his passion.” If for some reason he was struggling to get the plane into the air, or was overcome by smoke or otherwise distracted, his response time could have been affected by his age. But it is also possible he could have encountered problems no pilot could overcome.

MECHANICAL TROUBLE

Hijazi’s airplane had been built in 1974, making it more than four decades old. Still, experts don’t find that alarming.

“Many of the airplanes flying around in the sky are not new,” said Holly Inaba, a pilot, flight instructor and contract course coordinator in USC’s aviation program. “And the fact that it is older is not an extraordinary factor.”

Inaba said the Cessna 310 has a reputation for being a relatively safe model.

“It’s a typical twin-engine airplane,” said Bill Waldock, professor of behavioral and safety science at Embry-Riddle Aeronatical University in Prescott, Ariz.

He added that the Cessna 310’s accident record is roughly average among popular twin-engine planes people fly in the U.S. The planes were built between 1954 and 1981. During that time, Waldock said about 6,300 individual airplanes were produced. That compares to about 6,700 Beechcraft Barons and 5,000 Piper Seneca PA34s.

Citing NTSB’s data base, Waldock said that from 1982 to today there have been 600 accidents involving Cessna 310s, 184 of them fatal. That compares to 779 Baron accidents, 291 of them fatal, and 427 Seneca accidents, 121 of which were fatal, during the same period, he said.

“That’s a favorite plane of small businesses and families and so on,” said Glenn Winn, a USC instructor. “It’s a relatively safe airplane.”

ENGINE LOSS ON TAKEOFF

While Inaba characterized the aircraft as “a pretty nice, normal, fairly docile aircraft,” a problem on takeoff could have caused Hijazi to quickly lose control of the aircraft.

Inaba said that for a small airplane, its two engines give the Cessna a lot of pep, enabling it to cruise at 200 mph. “It’s nice to have an extra engine,” Waldock said. “But it’s also a little more complicated to fly — particularly if you lose an engine.”

That scenario, said Barry Gregory, a 72-year-old Southern California resident who’s been flying since he was 21, could be disastrous.

“Losing an engine in a twin is the worst-case scenario,” he said. In a Cessna 310, he said, “It’s going to take you right to the ground.”

If the Cessna’s rocking back and forth after takeoff reported by witnesses were caused by an engine loss, that malfunction could have overwhelmed the pilot, causing the plane to list to one side due to the now imbalanced thrust and then crash to the ground.

Winn said the various reports suggest the possibility of engine failure. And, said Anthony, had the plane reached its flying altitude, then an engine loss wouldn’t be as crippling as it would be during its initial climb.

“On takeoff, it becomes critical because you have one side puling and one side dragging,” said Anthony.

It doesn’t help, said Daniel Prather, chairman of aviation science at California Baptist University in Riverside, that takeoff is one of those times in flight — the other being landing — when aircraft are particularly vulnerable.

“It’s a very critical time,” said Prather, “and a necessary time for all systems to be functioning normally.”

SOMETHING ELSE

Experts said the ultimate cause of the crash could turn out to be one or more other things. For example, Knepper said that what caught his attention was the trail of smoke drifting from the aircraft in one of the crash videos. That, he said, could suggest that a fuel line had snapped, sparking a fire and triggering the rapid descent.

“Or did the occupants get overcome by smoke?” Knepper asked. “Fire is one that everyone worries about because, if you have fire on board, there is no way to get rid of it, beyond getting the plane down.”

Finally, there was a storm that day. The flying party reportedly waited for a break in the rain, then dashed out to the plane. Winn said he believes weather may have played a role.

Source:  http://www.mercurynews.com


SAN JOSE — Two families spent Wednesday mourning the loss of a preschool teacher, real-estate agent, and longtime pilot while also keeping vigil over two critically injured women who miraculously survived a “devastating” small-plane crash in Riverside on Monday.

A San Jose man has identified his mother as one of two survivors and his sister as one of three people killed when a twin-engine Cessna 310 airplane crashed Monday in a Riverside neighborhood shortly after takeoff. Co-workers and hospital officials also shed light on the identities of the other San Jose residents involved in the crash, including the presumed pilot and his wife who died, and their adult daughter, who is the other survivor.

Brandon Farelas, 19, of San Jose, confirmed his sister Adine Farelas, 22, of San Jose, was one of three people killed in Monday’s tragic crash in Riverside. Farelas said his mother Silvia Farelas survived the crash and that she remains in a Southern California hospital, where she is “doing better” and “recovering well.”

Riverside County Coroner’s Sgt. Todd Grimm said Wednesday he could not yet confirm the identities of those who died. There was someone assisting with identifications, Grimm said, and that the office hoped to announce the identities Wednesday afternoon or Thursday.

The plane was owned by San Jose resident Nouri Hijazi, and he was the presumed pilot.

Mark Folden, a broker at Fireside Realty in San Jose, affirmed that Dana Hijazi, a 67-year-old real estate agent, died in the crash. Records indicate Dana Hijazi was the pilot’s wife.

Riverside fire officials said Stacey Joanne Pierce — Dana Hijazi’s daughter — suffered third-degree burns to over 90 percent of her body and was airlifted to the burn center at Arrowhead Regional Medical Center in San Bernardino County. Hospital spokeswoman Justine Rodriguez confirmed in an email Wednesday that Pierce remains in critical condition.

All five plane occupants traveled to Southern California to watch a weekend cheerleading event at Disney’s California Adventure theme park: Pierce’s daughter (also Dana Hijazi’s granddaughter) and Silvia Farelas’ daughter (also Adine Farelas’ younger sister) were participants. Both middle-school-aged girls returned home on a bus chartered by the Union School District in South San Jose.

Pierce’s family released a statement Wednesday saying they they are “incredibly devastated and heart broken and are still trying to process everything.”

“Stacey is still in critical condition. We ask that you continue to pray for her recovery. I know how dedicated she is to her husband and kids and that will give her the strength she needs to fight,” the statement read.

The family also noted the closeness between Pierce and her mother, that Dana Hijazi “and Stacey truly were best friends and as close as a mother and daughter could be.”

Also in the statement, the family described Nouri Hijazi as “an extremely experienced pilot, which was his hobby, his passion.”

The family dispatch closed with gratitude for emergency responders and good Samaritans at the crash site, and a request for privacy: “At this time my brother has asked that him and the kids be given privacy to mourn the loss (of) Dana and (Nouri) and time to be with Stacey through this awful time. And we ask that you continue to pray for everyone involved.”

Brandon Farelas was reeling from the loss of his sister, Adine, who listed her occupation on Facebook as a  pre-school teacher in Los Gatos.

“Even at times that we didn’t get along so well and we’d argue back and forth like brothers and sisters tend to do, she would always be there for me and I appreciate her so much and now realize exactly what it is that I’m losing,” Brandon Farelas told ABC7.

Federal investigators are examining the crash site less than a mile east of Riverside Municipal Airport, where a San Jose-bound twin-engine Cessna 310 streaked back to Earth shortly after takeoff Monday. At least one witness account suggests the pilot and his passengers were dealing with visible mechanical trouble, including two false engine starts, before deciding to go through with the ill-fated flight.

On Tuesday, investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board offered no new insights into why the 43-year-old plane went down into two homes on Rhonda Road, where witnesses said it quickly burst into a fireball.

Stephen Stein, an air-safety investigator with the NTSB, said a preliminary report on the crash would be posted in the next five to 10 days. He noted that “the airplane itself is in quite a few pieces spread over a debris field, spread over 100 to 150 feet.”

“I’d like to encourage any witnesses who may have seen, heard, or observed anything to please submit statements or reach out to us,” said Stein, referencing the email address witness@ntsb.gov.

At a news conference Tuesday, Riverside Fire Capt. Tyler Reynolds reported a teenage girl, man, and woman, all hailing from San Jose, were killed. Their identities have not been released, but the Riverside fire chief said Monday that the pilot does not appear to be among the survivors.

It is not clear if firefighters mistakenly referred to the 22-year-old Adine Farelas as the teenage victim.

The two surviving victims, Pierce and Silvia Farelas, survived after being thrown from the plane on impact. Pierce was rescued by firefighters after they used thermal-imaging cameras to locate her in a bedroom of one of the destroyed homes.

Amid flames closing in around them, “they assisted that female adult patient out of the window,” Reynolds said.

Silvia Farelas was pulled away from the scene by firefighters and good Samaritans while screaming for her daughter, witnesses said. She was rushed to Riverside Community Hospital with apparent burns to her airway but was able to briefly speak to firefighters.


Source:  http://www.mercurynews.com


The victims of a deadly plane crash in Riverside on Monday have yet to be identified by investigators, but the family of three of the plane's occupants released a statement and photo late Tuesday night to NBC Bay Area.

Stacey Pierce was one of two survivors of the crash. She was still in critical condition Tuesday night. Her parents, Nouri and Dana Hijazi, were two of the three people killed in the crash, the family statement indicated. All three are San Jose residents.

Nouri Hijazi was the registered owner of the Cessna 310 that went down, according to FAA records, and is believed to have been the pilot at the time of the crash.

Family spokeswoman Christy Crown provided the following statement:

On behalf of our family, we want to say how incredibly devastated and heartbroken we are and still trying to process everything.

Stacey is still in critical condition. We ask that you continue to pray for her recovery. I know how dedicated she is to her husband and kids and that will give her the strength she needs to fight. Anyone who knows her knows how loving, caring, and outgoing she is and how her laugh can fill a room.

Dana, who was Stacey's mom and on board the plane, dedicated her life to Stacey and her four grandchildren, Brandon, Brad, Blaine, and Brooke. She was truly a happy, kind, loving, and warm person and really loved life! Her and Stacey truly were best friends and as close as a mother and daughter could be.

Nuri recently retired from a career he loved to spend time with his wife, daughter Stacey and her family. He was an extremely experienced pilot, which was his hobby, his passion.

They were devoted to each other and their family, which brought them so much joy.

Although I did not know the other passengers, we are praying for her recovery and healing. Our hearts go out to her and her family for the loss of her daughter.

We would like to thank the Riverside community; the emergency responders and bystanders who helped in rescuing our family members and did all they could to save them. And thank you to everyone out there for their love, support, thoughts, and prayers for everyone involved.

At this time my brother has asked that him and the kids be given privacy to mourn the loss (of) Dana and Nuri and time to be with Stacey through this awful time.

And we ask that you continue to pray for everyone involved.


Story and video:  http://www.nbcbayarea.com



RIVERSIDE, Calif.  --A family member of one of the Southern California plane crash victims is speaking out about his loss in the South Bay.

Silvia Farelas survived the fiery plane crash in Riverside. Her 22-year-old daughter Adine did not.

They were returning from a cheerleading competition in Southern California where Adine's younger sister competed.

The Union Middle School student arrived safely back in San Jose by bus with the rest of her team.

Her 19-year-old brother is left trying to cope with the loss of their big sister. "Even at times we didn't get along so well, argue back and forth like brothers and sisters tend to, she would always be there for me," Brandon Farelas told ABC7 News. "I appreciate her so much. Now I realize exactly what I'm losing."

Silvia and Adine were flying with friends. The Cessna plane crashed into homes near Riverside Airport, exploding into a massive fireball, killing three people on board.

"I give all the glory to the big man upstairs," said Farelas. "I don't know how else to put it into words. It's just a miracle."

A cafe owner near the airport was the last person to see the pilot alive. She said he appeared worried and attempted to take off three times. "I was so worried even the last moment they left," said Delmy Pennington. "I said, 'Why are they leaving?'"

Farelas said his mother was worried about flying in the weather. His attention is now on his younger sister. "To help her in the future become a strong woman like my mom and sister," he added.

Farelas said his mother has had surgery on her arm and is being moved to the burn unit for a second surgery.

The NTSB is investigating what happened.

Story and video:  http://abc7news.com











An National Transportation Safety Board investigator lifts yellow police tape as Riverside Animal Control officers carry a deceased animal from a home the day after a Cessna T310Q crashed killing three people.









National Transportation Safety Board Air Safety Investigator Stephen Stein speaks during a press conference at Riverside Municipal Airport the day after a Cessna T310Q crashed into the home killing three people.



Aviation expert says pilot had some control when Cessna T310Q went down at 120 mph in fiery crash, killing 3.




Delmy Pennington was working at her cafe at Riverside Municipal Airport on Monday afternoon when she noticed a small plane struggling to take off amid heavy rain.

“It looked like the airplane didn’t start right, something was wrong,” said Pennington, co-owner of the D&D Airport Cafe. 

The five people in the Cessna T310Q, who officials said were returning to San Jose after attending a cheerleading competition at Disney’s California Adventure, came back to the terminal before giving takeoff another try. They sat down at Pennington’s cafe, and she offered them menus and silverware.

After it stopped raining, the group returned to the plane, this time finally taking off. But Pennington said she was concerned about what she saw: The back of the plane shaking.

“It looked to me like it was hitting the floor,” Pennington said of the airplane’s tail. She said she had never seen that happen before, even though she has watched “thousands of airplanes” take off from the airport. 

Moments later, at 4:40 p.m., the plane crashed into a Riverside neighborhood, causing a large fire that destroyed one home and damaged several others.

A man, woman and teenage girl on board the plane were killed, and two other women were critically injured.

On Tuesday, investigators tried to piece together why the plane crashed, while residents of  the neighborhood surveyed the damage. 

Authorities have yet to publicly identify the plane’s occupants or who was flying the aircraft.

“The plane itself is in quite a few pieces” scattered over a 150-foot debris field, said Stephen Stein, an air safety investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board.

Firefighters described an intense battle to contain  the fire, which was fueled in part by the Cessna’s full tank. Debris was scattered across front lawns as far as half a mile away from the crash, Riverside Fire Chief Michael Moore said.

Riverside police Officer Ryan Railsback said one person was in the home where the plane crashed but was able to get out unharmed.

It’s “very remarkable that nobody else was injured. There are parts of this airplane that kind of spread out along the whole street,” he said.

Four houses were damaged as a result of the crash; two of them were red-tagged. 

Daniel Hernandez had been readying to go out for the evening when he heard a loud blast. 

Looking out the window, he saw his next-door neighbors’ house engulfed in flames. He ran out and watched in shock as a man came running out.

"It's a tragedy," 22-year-old Hernandez said, as he stood outside the yellow police tape that surrounded parts of his neighborhood Tuesday. "I'm just so sorry for the lives that were lost."

Firefighters who rushed to the scene found one home fully ablaze and another partially on fire. As they searched one of the homes, a fire captain heard moaning coming from inside a bedroom. 

A woman who had been in the plane had been ejected and was covered in debris. Firefighters quickly dug into the debris to free her and passed her through a window to others waiting outside, said Riverside Fire Capt. Tyler Reynolds.

The woman survived, although she suffered third-degree burns over 90% of her body, fire officials said. 

The survivors were women in their late 30s or early 40s, authorities said.

 It wasn’t known whether the victims were members of the same family, although the teenage victim might have had family members onboard, Reynolds said. 

Neighborhood residents helped pull one of the survivors to a safe location, Reynolds said. 

“I want to thank the community of this neighborhood for allowing the firefighters to get in, perform these rescues, protect life and protect property,” Reynolds said. “Unfortunately, again, it was a tragic incident.”

Mark Scheck’s home was one of those hit by the plane, although he said a neighbor’s home appeared to have taken the brunt of the crash. Scheck, his wife and their three children were not home at the time.

Scheck had lived in his home about five years with his wife, 7-year-old sons and 10-year-old daughter. The family was accustomed to the planes that came and went from the nearby airport. 

“I was more concerned about a train derailment, because we’re right by the train tracks,” Scheck said. “That’s what I was more worried about, not a plane falling from the sky.”

Scheck and his family have been staying at his parents’ home since. A GoFundMe page has been started to help raise funds for the family. 

“What do you do for something like this? It just boggles my mind,” Scheck said. “Who do you reach out to? I don’t know what to do.”

Those on the plane had spent part of the weekend at Disney California Adventure, which was hosting the Jr. USA Nationals cheerleading competition for girls under 15. The competition drew students from elementary and middle schools from around the state.

“Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families and friends of the victims," the organization said in a statement. 

Source:   http://www.latimes.com






RIVERSIDE — One teenager was among the three people killed Monday when a small plane that was headed to San Jose from a weekend cheerleading competition at Disney California Adventure Park, according to fire department officials.

At a press conference Tuesday, the Riverside Fire Department reported a teenage girl, man and woman were killed in the crash. Two other women on board the plane were rescued by firefighters and remain in critical condition, according to the fire department.

As of Tuesday morning, none of the five have been identified.

Monday, the plane, a Cessna 310, crashed into two homes and sparked a major fire, according to Riverside Fire Chief Michael Moore. No one on the ground was injured.

The two surviving victims, described as women in their late 30s to early 40s, were thrown from the plane on impact, Moore said. That allowed firefighters, who arrived at the crash within two to three minutes, “to make an effective rescue in just that short amount of time.”

Both women were listed in critical condition as of Monday night, Moore said. One of the women was taken to the Burn Center at Arrowhead Regional Medical Center in San Bernardino, Moore said.

The second woman was able to talk to firefighters about what had happened as she was taken to Riverside Community Hospital, Moore said. The woman told emergency responders her group was returning from the cheerleading competition.


The pilot does not appear to be one of the survivors, Moore said.


The plane that had just taken off from Riverside Municipal Airport at 4:40 p.m. Monday, nearly an hour later than scheduled, when it crashed, Moore said. The Cessna 310, built in 1974, is registered to Nouri Hijazi of San Jose, according to FAA records.


Three bodies were found in the combined wreckage of the plane and the homes.


“It’s horrible,” Moore said, especially given that they had gone to a cheer competition and it was “supposed to be a happy time.”


Moore did not give the name of the cheerleading competition, but the Jr. USA Nationals for girls age 15 and under was held at Disney California Adventure Park over the weekend.


Union and Dartmouth middle schools in South San Jose sent students to the competition. In response to inquiries that the plane-crash victims were associated with the trip, Union School District Denise Clay affirmed all of the students who participated were back in the Bay Area hours before the crash occurred.


“All of our students returned safely from the trip,” Clay said. “They all came back safely on the bus.”


Clay added that while identities of the victims have not been formally confirmed, the school district is preparing for the possibility.


“In the event that the victims are from our community, we have grief counselors available,” she said.


The two Riverside homes that were hit directly were destroyed, and there was minor damage to some neighboring houses, said Moore, adding that no one on the ground was hurt or killed.


The plane was broken into hundreds of pieces, its propeller sitting on the roof of a nearby home, and the fire burning with aviation fuel was still ablaze several hours after the crash.


Firefighters will do additional searches of the residences to make sure no one else was injured or killed.


H.L. Reyes, who lives about a quarter-mile from the crash site, told The Associated Press she felt the ground shake and saw plumes of black smoke.


“I thought it was a possible earthquake, and we heard all the birds just suddenly react outside, too,” Reyes said. “This was just like a nightmare coming true.”


Shannon Flores, a teacher at an elementary school about three blocks away, said she saw the plane out of her classroom window. She said it was raining during the crash, though other witnesses said the rain was very light.


“As soon as we saw it fly over, we knew it wasn’t a good thing,” Flores told KABC-TV. “We watched it go down very quickly. … Before we knew it, there was a loud crash and huge plumes of smoke.”


Source:  http://www.mercurynews.com





Two survivors of Monday's deadly plane crash in a Riverside neighborhood were recovering Tuesday after undergoing surgery, a Riverside police spokesman says.

One, who suffered burns, remains in critical condition, Officer Ryan Railsback said. The other, whose injuries were described Monday as minor, is stable, Railsback said. Both survivors were adult women.


The three killed in the crash were an adult man and woman and teenage girl, Railsback said. Their names have not been released.


On Monday, Riverside's fire chief had said the plane was carrying a husband and wife and three teenagers who had come to Southern California for a cheerleading competition at Disney California Adventure Park and were returning to San Jose.


At the scene of the crash on Rhonda Road, a mile east of Riverside Municipal Airport, a faint smell of smoke hung in the air Tuesday morning as firefighters continued combing through the wreckage. The bodies of the man and girl were removed late Tuesday morning; the woman's body had been removed previously.


The National Transportation Safety Board is leading the investigation into the crash. About 4:40 p.m. Monday, shortly after the Cessna 310 took off from the Riverside airport, the plane turned and began coming down steeply, witnesses said. It crashed into a house in the 6400 block Rhonda Road with such force that neighbors thought there had been a train derailment or earthquake, then burst into flames that could be seen blocks away.


Two houses were destroyed and several others were damaged. Wreckage was thrown at least a half-mile away, Fire Chief Michael Moore said Monday. Enough fuel from the plane's tank spilled that the fire burned into the night.


On Tuesday morning, Riverside fire department investigators could be seen on top of the roof of one of the burned houses, inspecting a propeller situated near the house's chimney.


The house directly south of that was half reduced to rubble. The burned-out shell of a PT Cruiser was in the driveway.


About 20 homes in the neighborhood were evacuated Monday night so the NTSB could conduct its investigation. A handful of families stayed overnight at a Red Cross shelter set up at a nearby community center.


By Tuesday morning, nearly all of the evacuated residents had returned home, Railsback said.


Source:  http://www.pe.com











Three people were killed and two were injured Monday when a plane nosedived into a Riverside neighborhood shortly after takeoff, destroying two houses and starting a fire that burned for hours.


At an evening news conference, Riverside Fire Chief Michael Moore had said four people were dead, but late Monday night he said three were killed, and said all had been on the airplane. No residents of the damaged homes were injured, he said.


The plane was carrying five people - a husband and wife and three teenagers - who had attended a weekend cheerleading competition at Disneyland, Moore said.


The Cessna 310 piloted by the wife had just taken off from Riverside Municipal Airport to return home to San Jose when, for reasons still unknown, it went down about 4:40 p.m. a mile east of the airport, setting several houses ablaze on Rhonda Road.


The impact felt like an earthquake, neighbors said, and sent up a "big orange ball of fire" that could be seen blocks away.


One of the injured victims was taken to Arrowhead Regional Medical Center in Colton to undergo surgery and was in "very critical" condition Monday night, Moore said. That hospital has the closest burn unit, though Moore did not say that was why the victim was taken there.


The other survivor, described as a teen girl, suffered what Moore called "very minor injuries." She was taken to Riverside Community Hospital.


"Upon impact, the plane pretty much split apart, and luckily she was ejected," Moore said.


In addition to the two houses that were destroyed, other adjacent homes sustained moderate damage, Moore said.


During his 7:30 p.m. briefing, Moore said fire officials were concerned that more victims could be inside the houses. By 10 p.m., he said that all residents of the homes had been accounted for. Firefighters were still searching the homes just to be sure, however.


Because of the large amount of fuel released during the crash, the fire was still burning late Monday. Moore said firefighters expected to remain on scene through the night.





EVACUATION, INVESTIGATION


The wreckage was scattered at least a half-mile away. Houses on several surrounding streets, about 20 of them, were being evacuated so the National Transportation Safety Board can do a thorough assessment. Residents of some of those homes had been sheltering in place during the fire.


While he said he imagined that Monday's weather - it rained much of the day and was overcast at the time of the crash - could have contributed to the cause, "I don't have that information."


Asked whether the teenage survivor told firefighters what happened in the plane, he said they left it to the NTSB to talk to her about that.


It was unknown how long the NTSB investigation would last or when the evacuation would be lifted.


The local American Red Cross chapter set up an emergency shelter at the nearby Joyce Jackson Community Center. It was prepared for up to 40 people, offering water, snacks, cots and counselors, chapter spokesman Tony Briggs said.


"We'll be open as long as they need us to be," Executive Director Lois Beckman said.




THE VICTIMS


The names and hometowns of the deceased have not yet been released. At one point during the news conference, Moore said he believed the people on the plane were all a family, but later he said he was not sure whether they were all related. A witness who helped pull the pilot out of the plane said she kept calling for her daughter.


Disney California Adventure Park in Anaheim hosted the United Spirit Association Jr. Nationals cheerleading competition on Saturday and Sunday.


“It’s horrible, especially when you couple together that they were going to a cheer competition and this was supposedly a happy time, and then just to have a tragic incident like this – and then into one of our Riverside residences that I’m sure always have that mild fear of something happening," Moore said. "It’s really just a sad, sad case for us."





'IT LOOKED LIKE A STUNT PLANE'


Brian Marsh said he saw the plane go down as he was driving west on Central Avenue.


“I thought it was turning to go back to Riverside (Municipal) Airport,” he said by phone. “It made a turn and the wings were almost perpendicular to the ground. It looked like a stunt plane. (Then) it turned and went into a nosedive. All of a sudden it turned into a freefall.


“Flames were everywhere. Smoke was billowing out,” Marsh said.


Elizabeth Espinoza happened to be looking out her parents' bedroom window from their home on Walter Street when she saw a plane that "was just going down."


"There was no flames on the plane. It was just going down," she said. She also heard a loud boom.


"I was kind of in a panic," Espinoza said.


Espinoza and her sisters were among the dozens of spectators who congregated outside to watch as a fleet of fire engines, ambulances, police cars and more than 60 firefighters worked at the scene.


Another bystander, Ken Sampson, who had been in his backyard when the plane went down, said he is used to seeing planes flying over the neighborhood. What struck him this time was that the plane wasn’t coming down at a proper angle – it looked too steep.


Then, he said, he saw a “big orange ball of fire.” The flames shot so high that he could see them from his house six blocks away.


NEIGHBORS PULL OUT PILOT


Marvinus Johnson, 31, and Breonna Johnson, 27, who live two houses to the right of where the plane crashed, were inside when they heard a boom and saw flames.


Breonna thought a train had derailed.


The impact blew out their front two windows, Marvinus said. A wing of the plane also crashed into their house.


They ran outside to help.


Marvinus said a man wearing a blue jacket was already there, near the plane. He said they saw the pilot crawling out. The man in the blue jacket pulled her first and Marvinus helped by grabbing her leg. They laid her across the street.


The pilot said her daughter and four other people were inside the plane, Marvinus said.


"The pilot was asking about her daughter the whole time," Breonna said. "We stayed next to the pilot to make sure she was OK - to check on her breathing."


Marvinus added, "We were holding her and all she kept saying was, 'My daughter, my daughter.'"


Marvinus said they went back to the crash site, but the flames were too much.


The Johnsons are in the health field and said it was first instinct to help. She's a nurse and he recently graduated from a respiratory therapist program.


"We're used to being in situations where there is chaos," he said.


Javier Gutierrez Jr., 15, heard the explosion and ran to the scene, where he saw a woman who identified herself as the pilot lying on the ground.


"She was covered in charcoal," Gutierrez said. "She didn't seem like she had very bad burns at all. She looked OK. She wasn't screaming. She was just kind of talking about it. I think she was in shock."


IT FELT LIKE AN EARTHQUAKE


Alberto Torres lives on Juanro Way, one street over from Rhonda Road. When he heard the crash and saw the flames, he said, he ran across the street to help his elderly neighbor, whose house backs up to the houses where the plane crashed.


The fire was on the other side of their back fence, so he tried watering it until his son said to leave. Torres said he and his son wrapped their neighbor in a blanket and brought her to their house for safety.


Bystander Amador Islaf, who lives a few blocks away on Walter Street, said the impact made the ground move – “it felt like a little earthquake.”


It also felt like an earthquake to H.L. Reyes, who lives about a mile from the scene and spoke by phone shortly after the crash.


"We all jumped up," Reyes said. "Even the birds outside reacted."


Source:  http://www.pe.com





















A family member has identified one of the victims of a plane crash in Riverside that killed three people and left two others hospitalized, CNN affiliate KGO is reporting.

Officials have not given the names of the victims or survivors of the crash, but have identified the victims as a teenage girl, a woman and a man.

Adine Farelas, 22, was killed in the crash, her brother Brandon Farelas told KGO.

Social media postings appear to identify the other victims, and they are all adults. Authorities said Tuesday that a man, a woman and a teenage girl died.

The plane was departing Riverside Airport for San Jose when it crashed a short time after takeoff, killing the three passengers and leaving two women hospitalized.

The group was in Southern California for a cheerleading conference at Disneyland, according to one of the survivors.

A Feb. 25 post on Adine Farelas’ Facebook page mentions her upcoming trip to Disneyland, which Brandon Farelas said was taken to see their younger sister compete.

"Even at times we didn't get along so well, argue back and forth like brothers and sisters tend to, she would always be there for me," Brandon Farelas told KGO. "I appreciate her so much. Now I realize exactly what I'm losing."

Brandon Farelas said his mother, Silvia Farelas, was one of the two women who survived of the fiery crash.

He told the television station his mother had surgery on her arm and was being moved to a burn unit for a second surgery.

The second survivor was listed in critical condition with burns over 90 percent of her body.

Silvia and Adine Farelas were traveling with friends aboard the twin-engine Cessna 310, Brandon Farelas said.

NTSB officials are still investigating the cause of the crash. They plan to look at environmental factors like weather and lighting, the pilot’s experience and flight records, and the engine and airframe.

The owner of a café at the airport said the pilot had trouble getting the plane started before takeoff, but the group eventually took off when the plane started on the third try.

A preliminary NTSB report will be issued in five to 10 days; a full summary of the crash could take 15 to 18 months.

Witnesses are asked to submit statements via email at witness@ntsb.gov.

Story and video:  http://ktla.com

34 comments:

jbermo said...

Multi engine, single pilot IFR in low ceilings, precip, with a (most likely) immediate after take off mechanical abnormal, rapidly rising terrain (10,000ft) to the north - all in a high performing, high time (43 year old) recip loaded with family. . . . Almost as stacked as it gets...... The pilot-ATP/CFI/CFII/MEI.

Anonymous said...

I agree with the above poster. This accident chain has a lot of links. Even with the most proficiency/currency, that was a lot for a human being to handle all at once. Very sad but I'm glad there were no casualties one on the ground. A huge black eye for GA.

Anonymous said...

Let's let the Feds do their job to determine the cause. An airplane with good maintenance can be almost any age. Yes, it's unfortunate but for now no one knows what happened or why.

don jenkins said...

According to this newspaper story, pilot had engine problems before take off..

http://www.pe.com/articles/adult-826461-previously-authorities.html

Anonymous said...

It's interesting that those passengers that were ejected from the aircraft survived the crash. Maybe they weren't lap seat belted?

Anonymous said...

The steep terrain is at least one city over. There are hills in the area, but it's pretty flat around the airport. Judging by the runway alignments and where they ended up, they would have been in quite a turn.

601P said...

The first picture, shows one of the propeller assembly's on a roof. looks like the blades are in the feathered position.

Anonymous said...

The 2 that were ejected, 90 percent of their bodies are covered in third-degree burns.

Anonymous said...

"blades are in the feathered position"
Sure does appear that way. (Great observation)

Anonymous said...


According to witnesses at the airport restaurant, the pilot aborted several takeoffs due to heavy rain and came back to wait it out. Then his wife was rushing him to leave. Then he had trouble getting one of the engine started. The links in the accident chain adding up to an obvious end.
A hotel stay over night and a quick check by a mechanic may have saved some lives.
They will be writing aviation articles about this one for sure.

Anonymous said...

Who was piloting the plane? If the above news report is accurate, it was the wife (who survived the crash). While husband held an ATP and Instructor's licenses, with AMEL privileges, wife holds only a Private Pilot's license, with ASEL. Likely scenario was a catastrophic engine failure immediately after take-off, followed by loss of control at a low altitude. Very tough situation to deal with. Successful outcome requires proper and immediate corrective action. Only a brief moment of hesitation/confusion is all it takes for a plane like the 310 to get away from the pilot. Tragic loss. So sorry.

Anonymous said...

According to Stephen Stein air safety investigator with the NTSB, he can't identify the pilot. NTSB "doesn't know at this time who was flying the plane".

don jenkins said...

Equipment installed for fatal crash plane..... It was foe sale in the past...

https://www.chooseyouritem.com/airplanes/files/9000/9104.html

Anonymous said...

This is sounding more and more like a case of get-there-itis (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/get-there-itis):
1.(aviation) The determination of a pilot to reach a destination even when conditions for flying are very dangerous.

Sad. The only silver lining, if one could even call it that, is that the grand-daughter whose competition was the purported reason for this trip to Riverside was not on the plane but rather took the bus with her friends back to San Jose according to this link: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4271596/Pictured-Survivor-California-family-plane-crash.html

John B said...

It's easy to armchair quarterback these situations. That being said, the first thing I thought was over-weight and/or out of c.g. If it's true the 310 left with "full fuel" as was reported, 5 souls aboard plus bags could put it right up there. Just speculation on my part...

Anonymous said...

It's unfortunate that this pilot and other piston twin pilots do not have the advantage that turbine pilots have with full motion simulator training. If the pilot flying had previous engine failure training, it was probably done in the air at light weights, vfr conditions, adequate warning and planning from the instructor, etc. If I was instructing this pilot, I would tell them that if they have an actual engine failure at gross weight, imc, night conditions, etc, their best bet is to reduce power on the operating engine to avoid a stall/spin, pick a landing area straight ahead, maintain flying speed, and hope for the best. The idea that a 45 year old Cessna 310Q with 310hp can maintain or gain altitude and airspeed under the conditions noted above is more or less fantasy. The pilots flying these piston aircraft should consider the reality of the situation and act accordingly. My condolences to the family and friends of the deceased.

--ATP, Lear 31/35/60, Citation, CFI

Anonymous said...

I agree hole heartedly with the above post. I have always taught that on departure in a 310 if an engine were to fail below 1,500 feet agl; yaw left Fx left, yaw right Fx right. Pick a suitable landing site ahead and with the operating engine minimize your descent rate. NEVER PICH THE AIRCRAFT UP - EVER. You will not climb. You will flip onto your back extremely fast. There just isn't enough time folks to execute the FAA's official engine out procedure. This is a mandatory departure briefing prior to departure flying piston twins. If the reports are true, this pilot should have never departed with a potential engine problem. Sad, very sad. Once again, it is the decision making that was mostly deficient in this case.

ATP, Air Carrier, CFI, Citation, 4K hrs plus in light twins.

Anonymous said...

ATP CFI _II, SEME. part 135, 6,100 hrs.

I have to agree with John B..

Anonymous said...

I have to agree with John B.

CFI II SEME, ATP.. 6100 Hrs.

Anonymous said...

a C310 can be difficult to start, the fuel injected engine can flood very easily so no mechanical issues evident - the fuel could be switched off to clear the engine and not switched to the correct tank for take off.
The 310 should also be capable of flying on a single engine to a density altitude of 5000' on one engine. . . very sad situation but it is amazing that people survived.
The prop on the roof seem to be feathered and was not rotating, from the video, it appears that it was the right engine that failed. and from the rate of descent, the airplane appears stalled.
just my opinion.
A&P IA. MEL. 310 owner for 26 yrs.

Anonymous said...

Like the above individual and Cessna 310 owner, I agree with him. I have a owned a C310D model for 15 years. The flight manual says that at gross weight the airplane should be able to climb at around 100 fpm to a max single engine altitude of 7,000 and maintain that altitude. I can tell you from experience that this is true. My flight instructor makes me demonstrate this every bi-annual flight review. Cessna twins are popular because of their single engine performance safety factor which exceeds the average General Aviation light twin. The airplane in question was also turbo-charged which gives it an additional power advantage, if the aircraft is properly maintained and all systems related are functioning properly. Like with all twin engine airplanes, the departure is the most hazardous. If those engines are not operating at peak during initial take-off roll, continuing with the take-off could present unwanted effects.
A&P IA MEL

Johnny Newmano said...

I owned flew and maintained a 1974 Cessna 310 Q N1258G so this hits pretty close to home. bottom line is no one knows what the heck happened until we speak with survivors and get the NTSB report. It's all speculation. One thing I know for sure is that you don't want to ever lose an engine on takeoff when heavy. God bless the family. Also warm starts on the 310 are a bitch so not uncommon for restart to be difficult.

J.P. said...

I had a Cessna 310 for years, and those Continental engines can be difficult to start when hot. If, per the witness reports, the pilot had difficulty in starting the engine after he had attempted earlier takeoffs, the engine would be hot and the difficult start is "normal" for those engines. Therefore, before the investigation continues, I would not think a difficult engine start would mean anything.

Anonymous said...

I agree on hot starts for the fuel injected engine, but it does not sound like it was a hot start. It sure wasn't a hot day. Two things stick out to me on this one. Dana was not rated for multi-engine and may have been in the pilot's seat. We had some really heavy rain, and I wonder how good the o-rings were on their fuel caps.

Anonymous said...

The twin engine, Cessna design is unique—having its turbocharger hard-mounted to the airframe.
Consequently, the exhaust system must accommodate the movement of the engine on its shock mounts by a
system of ball and slip joints. If those joints stiffen up in service (as they do), significant stress may be transferred
to exhaust components aft of the slip joints (specifically elbows—and the Wye duct header bolted under the
turbocharger). This can result in fatigue failure, particularly at the flanges where the components are joined by
V-band clamps. The twin Cessna’s exhaust is also unique in that the exhaust plumbing passes through tunnels in
the canted airframe bulkhead (via elbows), and through the engine nacelles (via tailpipes). They are quite difficult
to inspect visually. This is why the pressure test and tailpipe removal mandated by AD 2000-01-16 is so critical.
Additionally, unlike other manufacturers' aircraft, the twin Cessna models mount their engines on aluminum box
beams passing through the firewall and tying into the wing structure. The exhaust plumbing passes very close to
these aluminum engine mount beams. An exhaust failure in this area can burn a hole in this part, allowing hot
exhaust gas to flow through the beam—routing behind the firewall in proximity to the aluminum cross-feed fuel
lines. This scenario can lead to overheating and rupture of the fuel-cross feed line and result in an uncontrolled,
fuel-fed fire. This failure has led to a number of fatal accidents. Additionally, 300 series and early 400 series
Cessna twins are not equipped with cross-feed shutoff valves, so in the event of an in-flight fire it is impossible to
shut off the fuel supply to these cross-feed lines.
The Cessna twin exhaust systems have been the subject of numerous FAA AD’s and NTSB Safety
Recommendations since the 1970’s. AD 2000-01-16 was developed through an FAA/Industry effort in the late
1990's to address numerous exhaust system failures and fatal accidents (30 fatal in 30 months). With the
development of the AD, the FAA elected to manage an unsafe condition on these products by means of
mandatory repetitive inspection requirements as defined in the directive. It is critical that it be understood—these
exhaust system failures can result in an undetected and uncontrolled fuel-fed fire, resulting in engine beam, canted
bulkhead and/or firewall damage, and potentially catastrophic wing failure.
Nine years after the implementation of AD 2000-01-16, there is evidence the AD required inspections are not
being conducted properly—or not at all. "Pencil-whipped" is the ubiquitous term often suggested as cause for this
problem. It means, of course, "...failure to perform." There may also be a lack of understanding of the AD
requirements, experience with the AD, or the criticality to safety these required exhaust system inspections pose.
There is safety data indicating the AD has been effective, but only when accomplished properly. The AD is
lengthy, detailed, and has repetitive inspection requirements that cover many aspects of the exhaust system. The
AD requires diligence to accomplish properly and offers few opportunities for carelessness without serious
consequence. The criticality of this safety issue warrants direct, careful adherence to the AD, without short cuts or
deviations which may lead to exhaust system failure.
New evidence indicates exhaust system parts have failed after satisfactorily passing numerous inspections and
being signed off with no discrepancies noted. The failures appear to be due to improper assembly of the exhaust
system after engine or exhaust system inspection, repairs or overhaul. The improper installation resulted in the
parts being preloaded (pre-stressed), eventually leading to fatigue failure. These failures had also gone undetected
through multiple inspection cycles.

Anonymous said...

5 people in a 310? Come on. I've never even flown a late model 310 with more than 4 seats in it and I've never flown one with more than 3 (man size) people. And then baggage? And fuel to go 3 hours? I can't think of any situation where this adds up favorably just on the face of it. I wouldn't do this trip in anything less than a 402, MAYBE in a 421. WAY WAY WAY too much risk. I started flying 41 years ago and I am so sick of the senseless carnage. Of people with big egos and bank accounts but no sense of aviation reality. And I am so sorry for the hapless innocent people who lose their lives and/or futures to these idiots. I am not an airline pilot. But I make a living flying as captain of a multiengine turboprop aircraft with a professional crew and each and every part of the operation, from chalk to chalk, deserves and receives professional attention and care. And I am STILL on edge during every takeoff and landing. Why ANYONE would fly ANY airplane without this attitude is beyond me.

Anonymous said...

For the post 3-5 @ 10:11, Sir, I agree with you 100%.

ATP, CFI, Air Carrier, over 5k hrs. In 310 models.

Anonymous said...

Outstanding knowledge and insight! Sunday, March 5 at 10:11 PM = this is excellence! Thank you!

Anonymous said...

"Still on the edge" that and respect are the main reasons we are alive! In aviation - complacency kills!

Anonymous said...

According to Brooke (in a recent video), she didn't take the flight home in the 310 because "there was too much luggage onboard".

Anonymous said...

Very sad. Flying is such a joy.

Unknown said...

Tsio 520 start:
Full rich
Full throttle
Squirt from boost pump
Start
Immediate idle throttle
Hot cold or indifferent
Works every time on floats
It has to!

Anonymous said...

Does anyone notice anything consistant?

ATP, CFI ~16K hrs.

Anonymous said...

Older pilots in accident aircraft, not self-regulating?
I'm a 63 year old private pilot and aircraft owner. As I age I must fly more, not less, to keep my skills current - and not simply fly cross country on autopilot. Also, I frequently practice maneuvers such as stalls, slow flight, simulated engine failure during takeoffs, crosswind landings, in order to stay up on my flying. Age does take a toll. Reflexes, hearing and eyesight are not as keen as the under 40 year olds. My reactions are not as quick as they once were. When the time comes and I'm not physically capable or I'm not flying enough to stay current, I have promised my family and myself that I'm going to hang up my spurs.