Sunday, October 23, 2016

Boeing B75N1, 3G Classic Aviation Inc., N56200: Accident occurred May 11, 2016 near Winslow-Lindbergh Regional Airport (KINW), Winslow, Navajo County, Arizona

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

3G CLASSIC AVIATION INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N56200

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07


NTSB Identification: WPR16LA106
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 11, 2016 in Winslow, AZ
Aircraft: BOEING B75N1, registration: N56200
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 11, 2016, about 1710 mountain standard time, a Boeing B75N1, N56200, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a partial loss of engine power during takeoff initial climb at the Winslow-Lindbergh Regional Airport (INW), Winslow, Arizona. The airplane was registered to 3G Classic Aviation LLC., and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot and her passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The cross-country flight was originating at the time of the accident with an intended destination of Phoenix, Arizona.

In a written statement to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), the pilot reported that prior to takeoff; she conducted an engine run up and pre takeoff checks, which included leaning for density altitude, and conducted a static power check, which was in the normal range. The pilot further reported that during takeoff from runway 29, the airplane accelerated and climbed out normally, with the tachometer indicating 2,250 rpm. As the airplane was about 50 feet above ground level, it began to descend. The pilot stated that in order to avoid powerlines, she performed a left turn to maintain clearance, and verified the throttle, mixture, propeller, fuel, and carburetor heat settings. Subsequently, the airplane struck the ground, rolled about 20 feet, the right main landing gear impacted vegetation, and the airplane cartwheeled. The pilot reported that just prior to landing; she observed the tachometer indicating 2,000 rpm. The pilot added that earlier in the day, they had flown three flights, totaling about 5 hours of flight time. The flights included uneventful takeoffs from two airports with a higher density altitude.

Postaccident examination of the airplane by the pilot revealed that all four wings, tail, and fuselage were structurally damaged. The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Examination of the recovered wreckage revealed that the upper and lower wings were removed by the wreckage recovery company to facilitate wreckage transport. The empennage and right gear leg were also separated from the fuselage. The engine, a Lycoming R-680-E3B, rated at 300 horsepower, remained attached to the fuselage via its mounts. The fuselage was hoisted by a forklift, and the right gear leg was subsequently removed. Throttle, mixture, and propeller control continuity was established from the rear cockpit controls to the engine.

The front spark plugs were removed and examined. All nine spark plugs were intact and undamaged. The number one and two spark plugs exhibited black deposits within the electrode area, and the remaining spark plugs exhibited gray deposits within the electrode area. All engine accessories remained attached to the engine, and exhibited no damage. The carburetor was intact, and all linkages were secure. The carburetor fuel screen was removed, and a gray / tan liquid was drained from the carburetor. The fuel screen was free of debris. The liquid smelled similar to 100 Low Lead fuel, and tested negative for water using water finding paste. The air filter was removed, and a red dirt substance was observed within the housing, however, the air filter element appeared to be mostly free of debris. The gascolator screen and bowl was free of debris.

The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft, and exhibited an approximate 20 degree bend aft from about mid span on either blade.

The spark plugs and carburetor fuel screen were reinstalled. About 8 gallons of fuel was added to the center wing fuel tank. The engine was primed using the airframe fuel pump, and subsequently started. The engine was run for about 10 minutes at various power settings. During the engine run, a maximum power setting of 2,200 rpm and 28 inches of manifold pressure was obtained. A magneto test was performed at 1,500 rpm with a drop of about 75 to 100 rpm noted. The engine was manually shut off using the mixture.

Using the reported airport elevation of 4,941 feet, recorded weather conditions from about 14 minutes prior to the accident, the NTSB IIC calculated the density altitude to be about 7,223 feet and a pressure altitude of 4,757 feet.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA106
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 11, 2016 in Winslow, AZ
Aircraft: BOEING B75N1, registration: N56200
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 11, 2016, about 1710 mountain standard time, a Boeing B75N1, N56200, was substantially damaged during a forced landing at the Winslow-Lindbergh Regional Airport (INW), Winslow, Arizona. The airplane was registered to 3G Classic Aviation LLC., and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot and her passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The cross-country flight was originating at the time of the accident with an intended destination of Phoenix, Arizona.

The pilot reported that during takeoff from runway 29, as the airplane ascended to about 30 to 50 feet above the ground, the engine began to lose RPM. The pilot initiated a left turn to avoid power lines and subsequently landed off airport. During the landing roll, the right main landing gear sunk into the ground and the airplane cartwheeled. The pilot reported that all four wings, tail, and fuselage were structurally damaged.

The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination.




British 'Bird in a Biplane' stripped of flying award amid claims she wasn't flying solo

Self-styled 'Bird in a Biplane' Tracey Curtis-Taylor has been stripped of a prestigious flying award following claims she wasn’t flying solo.

The decision by The Light Aircraft Association came amid allegations she had a co-pilot on her epic flights.

The respected Light Aircraft Association has rescinded its coveted Bill Woodhams Trophy which it awarded to her in 2015 for flying from Cape Town to Britain for navigational and flying skill.

It is thought to be the first time such an award has been rescinded.

Members of the LAA voted 123 to 65 to rescind the trophy at an Annual General Meeting at Sywell Aerodrome in Northamptonshire on Saturday.

Curtis-Taylor, 54, who attended the AGM in a bid to head off the motion, has been mired in controversy after flight instructor Ewald Gritsch revealed he occupied the forward cockpit of her vintage bi-plane for most of the legs of her famous journeys.

Her former logistics manager Sam Rutherford also said Curtis-Taylor had been guilty of embellishing the truth and had only flown four of the 36 legs from Cape Town to Goodwood solo.

Veteran member of the Light Aircraft Association Barry Tempest, who proposed her award be withdrawn in the light of the revelations, said: “I am delighted the award has been rescinded and her name will removed from the annals of the Light Aircraft Association.

“I have the greatest of respect for women pilots but I think Tracey Curtis-Taylor has not done a lot the further their case.

“I think she is a boastful lady who needs bringing down a peg or two.

“She made these claims about flying solo, or at least that is what we were lead to believe, and now it has come out that they were not that at all.

“Far from it. I believe the integrity of the LAA has been restored.”

On the surface the former waitress’s trips in her 1942 Boeing Stearman mirrored some of history’s greatest exploits by solo female flyers.

The trip from Cape Town to Goodwood, West Sussex was first completed solo by Lady Mary Heath in 1928.

Curtis-Taylor completed the 36-leg, 10,000-mile-flight in 2013 and in 2015 received the award from the Light Aircraft Association for the feat.

Mr. Gritsch was also on board for parts of her trip from Farnborough to Sydney, where she arrived in January after a flight covering 23 countries in 50 legs, recreating the 1930 journey of the intrepid Amy Johnson.

When she crashed in Arizona earlier this year on the third leg of her round-the-world flights Austrian co-pilot Gritsch was seen scrambling from the wreckage and his presence triggered a storm of outrage on respected flight forums Flyer and Pprune.

More details emerged about Curtis-Taylor’s vintage plane being equipped with GPS navigational equipment and the presence a support plane.

She faced more awkward questions about why Gritsch appears to have been edited out of a BBC documentary about her first big flight from Cape Town to Goodwood.

The Light Aircraft Association said it would respect the vote of its members.

In recent months Curtis-Taylor has sought to defuse the growing controversy by stating that she never claimed to be flying solo.

Tracey Curtis-Taylor was unavailable for comment.

Story and photo gallery:  http://www.mirror.co.uk

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