Sunday, April 10, 2016

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, N95118: Accident occurred April 10, 2016 near Bayport Aerodrome (23N), Long Island, Suffolk County, New York

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Farmingdale, New York
Textron Lycoming; Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Piper Aircraft Company; Vero Beach, Florida 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N95118 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Bayport, NY
Accident Number: ERA16LA152
Date & Time: 04/10/2016, 1907 EDT
Registration: N95118
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-140
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 10, 2016, at 1907 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-140, N95118, sustained substantial damage shortly after takeoff from Bayport Aerodrome (23N), Bayport, New York. The private pilot and the passenger were seriously injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight operated under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight was originating at the time of the accident and destined for Orange County Airport (MGJ), Montgomery, New York.

The pilot stated that the preflight inspection, engine run-up, and takeoff were normal. He said that when the airplane was about 300 ft mean sea level, he heard a "pop" and the engine sputtered before it completely stopped producing power. The pilot immediately checked the fuel selector valve, the magneto switch, the mixture control, and the carburetor heat, but they were all in their "proper positions." He then executed a forced landing to a road but collided with a set of power lines with the left wing. The airplane then impacted the ground and a postimpact fire ensued. The pilot estimated there were 37 gallons of fuel on board at the time he departed.

According to eyewitnesses, the airplane's engine back-fired twice before it stopped producing power on takeoff. They watched as it then made a sweeping right turn, before it struck trees and power lines. The airplane came to rest in the middle of an intersection in a residential area. A post-impact fire ensued, and neighbors and responding rescue personnel assisted the pilot and passenger's egress from the burning airplane. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, the firewall, the fuselage, and the tail section.

A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed the flaps were in the fully retracted position. Flight control cable continuity was established from all major flight controls to the cockpit area. About 5-8 gallons of fuel were removed from the left-wing fuel tank and the right-wing fuel tank was breached.

The engine crankshaft could not be rotated due to impact damage. Cylinder compression and valve train continuity could not be confirmed. Rather, the cylinders and pistons were removed, and mechanical continuity of the engine was established. The magnetos were removed from the engine. The ignition leads were removed due to thermal damage. Each magneto was spun and produced spark at all towers. The spark plugs were removed and compared to the Champion Check-A-Plug Chart. Each plug exhibited normal wear.

The oil filler port sustained impact damage. A small amount of oil was drained from the oil suction screen area and some non-metallic debris was noted on the screen. The oil filter was removed and opened. The filter element was absent of debris.

The carburetor remained on the engine but sustained impact and thermal damage. The butterfly valve in the heat box was open, consistent with the carburetor-heat being turned off. The carburetor was disassembled, and a small amount of fuel was in the bowl. The fuel was negative for water. The fuel inlet screen was removed and absent of debris.

The engine-driven fuel pump was removed. When manually rotated, fuel was observed exiting the outlet of the pump and suction was confirmed at the inlet. A small amount of fuel was observed in the gascolator bowl and the screen was absent of debris. The electric fuel pump filter was removed. It was wet with fuel and absent of debris.

Examination of the fuel selector valve appeared to be set to the "left" tank, but the cover had been damaged and partially torn away from the valve during impact. The pilot said the valve was set to the right tank when he took off. When the selector handle was moved, it was loose and the detents for the left and right tanks could not be easily felt. Blue-colored staining was also observed around the valve, consistent with a fuel leak. The valve was then tested in place by blowing shop air through the main fuel line from the engine. Air blew freely through the system on both the left and right tank positions.

The fuel selector valve was removed and examined at the NTSB Materials Laboratory, Washington D.C. Numerous tool marks were observed on the valve cap consistent with it having been disassembled numerous times. The valve's internal components were removed and found to not be installed in the order outlined in the airplane's service manual. The valve's components were worn and the position-washer, which keeps the valve from rotating beyond the detents, was worn on both sides and appeared to have been inverted and reused. According to the airplane's service manual, the fuel selector valve was to be inspected every 400-hours. The inspection required the valve cap and the internal components to be removed and inspected, including the position washer for signs of extreme wear. If so, the washer should be replaced. A review of the airplane's maintenance logbook revealed that the last inspection of the fuel selector valve was made on June 22, 2013, at an airframe total time of 11,966.14 hours. At that time, only a new "O-ring" was replaced in the fuel selector valve.

A review of the airplane and engine maintenance manuals revealed the last annual inspection was completed on November 9, 2015. At the time of the accident, the airplane had accrued a total of 12,064.24 hours and the engine had accrued about 2,020 hours.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He reported a total of 85 hours, of which, 25 hours were in the same make/model airplane as the accident airplane. His last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical was issued on April 30, 2012.

Toxicological testing of the pilot's initial blood draw taken upon his admission to the hospital and tested by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, identified 0.0123 ug/ml of tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (THC-COOH), the primary inactive metabolite of THC, the main psychoactive component in marijuana. However, no THC was identified. This finding is consistent with the pilot having used marijuana at some point preceding the accident but was no longer being impaired by its effects when the accident occurred.

At 1856, weather at Long Island McArthur Airport (ISP), New York, New York, about 3 miles west of the accident site, was reported as wind from 180 degrees at 12 knots, visibility 10 miles, few clouds at 15,000 ft, broken clouds at 26,000 ft, temperature 43° F, dewpoint 25° F, and an altimeter setting of 30.30 inHg.

The carburetor icing probability chart from the FAA Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB): CE-09-35 Carburetor Icing Prevention, June 30, 2009, shows a probability of icing at cruise/glide power at the temperature and dew point reported at the time of the accident.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 34, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/30/2012
Occupational Pilot:
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/17/2016
Flight Time:  85 hours (Total, all aircraft), 25 hours (Total, this make and model), 27 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 35 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N95118
Model/Series: PA 28-140 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1969
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28-25812
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/09/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2150 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 31 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 12064.2 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-320 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: ISP, 41 ft msl
Observation Time: 1856 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 224°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 15000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 6°C / -4°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / * ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots, 180°
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 30.3 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):  
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Bayport, NY (23N)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Montgomery, NY (MGJ)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1907 EDT
Type of Airspace: Unknown

Airport Information

Airport: Bayport Aerodrome (23N)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 41 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 18
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2740 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  40.752778, -73.053611

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA152
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 10, 2016 in Bayport, NY
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-140, registration: N95118
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 10, 2016, at 1907 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-140, N95118, sustained substantial damage shortly after takeoff from Bayport Aerodrome (23N), Bayport, New York. The private pilot and the passenger were seriously injured. The airplane was registered to a private individual. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight operated under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight was originating as the time of the accident and destined for Orange County Airport (MGJ), Montgomery, New York.

According to eyewitnesses, the airplane's engine lost power on takeoff. They then watched as it made a sweeping right turn, "stalled," and struck trees and power lines. The airplane came to rest in the middle of an intersection in a residential area. A post-impact fire ensued, and neighbors and responding rescue personnel assisted the pilot and passenger's egress from the burning airplane. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, the firewall, fuselage and tail section.


The airplane and engine were recovered and retained for further examination.





BAYPORT, N.Y. — Two people were injured when a small plane crashed in the middle of a Suffolk County residential street Sunday evening.

Suffolk County Police say around 7 p.m., a Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee crashed in the middle of Third Avenue and Second Street in Bayport. The crash happened not far from the Bayport Aerodrome.

Bayport Fire Chief Robert Fleming said two men were in the plane at the time of the crash.

A video posted to Twitter shows a crowd forming around the plane that went up in flames.

Both men were conscious when EMS arrived on the scene.

One of the men was airlifted and the other taken by ground transportation to Stony Brook University Hospital.

A resident in the area, who is also a pilot, said the pilot did the best he could to avoid hitting any homes.

The FAA is assisting in the investigation.

The NTSB will determine the cause of the crash.

Story and video:  http://pix11.com








BAYPORT, Long Island (WABC) -- A small plane that was heading back to Bayport Aerodrome crashed on a street in Bayport.

Two people were taken to the hospital.

There is no word on their injuries.

The Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee was going south when it lost power and was heading back to the landing strip and then the plane clipped a PSE&G light pole, and then crashed in the middle of the road.

Original article can be found here: http://abc7ny.com






FOX 5 NY (WNYW-TV) - A small plane crashed onto a Long Island street Sunday night.

The Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee slammed into 3rd Avenue in Bayport.

These planes are capable of carrying up to 4 people. 

A video posted to Twitter features an eye witness account of the fiery crash. 

Authorities have not yet determined why the plane crashed or how many were on board.

Original article can be found here: http://www.fox5ny.com

Pilot Scott Clifford, 34, was trying to head back to the aerodrome possibly due to engine failure. Clifford has two broken legs and a head injury and is now in the hospital in serious condition. Passenger Mike Rolm, 65, suffered non life-threatening head injuries.

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