Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Cessna 150L, Drake Aerial Enterprises LLC, N6622G; Fatal accident occurred June 27, 2016 near Coleman A Young Municipal Airport (KDET), Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan and Accident occurred February 12, 2011 in Trenton, Michigan -Kathryn's Report

DRAKE AERIAL ENTERPRISES LLC DBA: http://registry.faa.gov/N6622G

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA East Michigan FSDO-23

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA236
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 27, 2016 in Detroit, MI
Aircraft: CESSNA 150L, registration: N6622G
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 27, 2016, about 2100 eastern daylight time, a Cessna model 150L single-engine airplane, N6622G, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in Detroit, Michigan. The commercial pilot was not injured. An individual on the ground was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Drake Aerial Enterprises, LLC, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the banner-tow flight that departed from Coleman A. Young Municipal Airport (DET), Detroit, Michigan, about 1748.

The pilot reported that after takeoff he initially remained in the airport traffic pattern while he retrieved the banner to be towed. After retrieving the banner he proceeded to orbit the Detroit River until 2053 when he decided to return to the airport. While en route to the airport, about 2057, the engine began to run roughly. The pilot reported that he enriched the fuel mixture and turned on the auxiliary fuel pump following the loss of engine power. The engine ran for a few additional seconds before it experienced a total loss of power. The pilot informed the tower controller of his emergency, released the banner, and completed a forced landing to a nearby street. The airplane collided with a power line during the forced landing. An individual, who had been retrieving items from her parked vehicle, was seriously injured when she came in contact with the severed live power line. On July 6, 2016, the individual subsequently died while being treated at a local hospital.

The accident airplane was powered by a 180 horsepower Lycoming O-360-A4A engine. The engine had been installed in conformance with Supplemental Type Certificate No. SA4795SW. The airplane was also equipped with extended-range fuel tanks that increased the fuel capacity to 40 gallons (37 gallons usable). The pilot reported that the airplane had a full fuel load when it departed on the accident flight.

According to the operator, a typical banner-tow flight in the Cessna 150 had an expected fuel consumption rate of 9.5-10.5 gallons per hour. Additionally, to avoid fuel exhaustion situations, it was company policy that all banner-tow flights in the Cessna 150 be limited to 2 hours 45 minutes. According to the pilot's statement, the accident flight was at least 3 hours 9 minutes in duration. Further, the pilot reported that a higher-than-normal engine power setting had been used throughout the accident flight.


A postaccident examination was completed by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector before the wreckage was recovered from the accident site. The FAA examination of the fuel system established that the left fuel tank was empty, the right fuel tank contained residual fuel, and the gascolator contained a few ounces of fuel.

A woman electrocuted by a live wire downed by a crashing plane has died, more than a week after she was declared brain dead, according to officials and a family friend.

Theresa Surles, 38, died Wednesday, according to the Wayne County Medical Examiner’s Office. She is scheduled for an autopsy Thursday.

Surles initially was reported by police to be 45 years old.

“She leaves behind six kids, two grandbabies, a grandbaby on the way and a host of family and friends,” longtime family friend Lisa Jones said. “We all had hope. That’s a lot to leave behind.”

Jones is godmother to Surles’ 19-year-old daughter and knew the woman for more than 20 years, she said. Other children range in age from 17 to 24 years old, including two sets of twins.

“The children took it hard,” Jones said.

Funeral arrangements are pending, but there are plans for the women in Surles’ life to serve as pallbearers at a Monday service, Jones said.

“We all grew up with her,” said Jones, who will be a pallbearer. “Her sister said she wanted (Surles’) friends to be part of it.”

Family and friends were there when Surles was struck by a live wire around 9 p.m. June 27 outside her home at Shoemaker and Cooper, Jones said.

“She was preparing to go to the fireworks with her children, so they witnessed this ordeal,” Jones said. “As Theresa was getting out of the car, the wire hit her in the chest and she fell. She stopped breathing, she died, they tried to resuscitate her and her heart started.

“But she never regained consciousness through this whole ordeal and they decided to take her off life support.”

The single-engine Cessna 150L was registered to Drake Aerial Enterprises, LLC, according to a preliminary report by the National Transportation Safety Board. It crashed while helmed by an 18-year-old commercial pilot who ran out of fuel on his way to the Coleman A. Young International Airport on the city’s east side, officials said last week.

It struck a utility pole, bringing down the wire that electrocuted Surles. She was rushed to Detroit Receiving Hospital, initially listed in serious condition. The pilot suffered minor abrasions and was able to climb out of the plane.

The plane crashed after the pilot flew for too long and ran out of fuel, according to the NTSB.

“To avoid fuel exhaustion situations, it was (Drake Aerial Enterprises) company policy that all banner-tow flights in the Cessna 150 be limited to 2 hours 45 minutes. According to the pilot’s statement, the accident flight was at least 3 hours 9 minutes in duration,” officials said. “The FAA examination of the fuel system established that the left fuel tank was empty, the right fuel tank contained residual fuel, and the gascolator contained a few ounces of fuel.”

The plane first encountered trouble when its “engine began to run roughly” while returning to the airport after towing a banner over the Detroit River during the fireworks, according to the report. The pilot enriched the fuel mixture and turned on the auxiliary fuel pump before the plane experienced a total loss of power.

“The pilot informed the tower controller of his emergency, released the banner, and completed a forced landing to a nearby street,” NTSB wrote in its report. “The airplane collided with a power line during the forced landing. An individual, who had been retrieving items from her parked vehicle, was seriously injured when she came in contact with the severed live power line.”

The report was later updated to reflect Surles’ death.

The pilot was not taken into custody last week at the crash scene. Detroit police referred questions to the FAA and NTSB, which are investigating the crash. Officials with both agencies could not comment on the pilot’s status.


http://www.detroitnews.com

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA236
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 27, 2016 in Detroit, MI
Aircraft: CESSNA 150L, registration: N6622G
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 27, 2016, about 2100 eastern daylight time, a Cessna model 150L single-engine airplane, N6622G, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in Detroit, Michigan. The commercial pilot was not injured. An individual on the ground sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Drake Aerial Enterprises, LLC, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the banner-tow flight that departed from Coleman A. Young Municipal Airport (DET), Detroit, Michigan, about 1748.

The pilot reported that after takeoff he initially remained in the airport traffic pattern while he retrieved the banner to be towed. After retrieving the banner he proceeded to orbit the Detroit River until 2053 when he decided to return to the airport. While en route to the airport, about 2057, the engine began to run roughly. The pilot reported that he enriched the fuel mixture and turned on the auxiliary fuel pump following the loss of engine power. The engine ran for a few additional seconds before it experienced a total loss of power. The pilot informed the tower controller of his emergency, released the banner, and completed a forced landing to a nearby street. The airplane collided with a power line during the forced landing. An individual, who had been retrieving items from her parked vehicle, was seriously injured when she came in contact with the severed live power line.

The accident airplane was powered by a 180 horsepower Lycoming O-360-A4A engine. The engine had been installed in conformance with Supplemental Type Certificate No. SA4795SW. The airplane was also equipped with extended-range fuel tanks that increased the fuel capacity to 40 gallons (37 gallons usable). The pilot reported that the airplane had a full fuel load when it departed on the accident flight.

According to the operator, a typical banner-tow flight in the Cessna 150 had an expected fuel consumption rate of 9.5-10.5 gallons per hour. Additionally, to avoid fuel exhaustion situations, it was company policy that all banner-tow flights in the Cessna 150 be limited to 2 hours 45 minutes. According to the pilot's statement, the accident flight was at least 3 hours 9 minutes in duration. Further, the pilot reported that a higher-than-normal engine power setting had been used throughout the accident flight.

A postaccident examination was completed by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector before the wreckage was recovered from the accident site. The FAA examination of the fuel system established that the left fuel tank was empty, the right fuel tank contained residual fuel, and the gascolator contained a few ounces of fuel.









DETROIT (AP) — A small plane that had been trailing a banner over crowds gathered for a fireworks display crash-landed in a Detroit residential street, injuring the pilot and a bystander who was electrocuted by a power line that the aircraft brought down, authorities said.

Early reports by police suggested the plane had to land Monday night because it was running out of fuel. The pilot reported engine failure, Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Tony Molinaro said Tuesday, and he anticipated it would take a few weeks to investigate the crash.

"I was walking up the street here, and then all of a sudden, a plane was just a little too low and it actually hit poles and a wire here," witness Dondra Mainor told WDIV-TV.

The plane flew out of Coleman A. Young International Airport, Molinaro said. Located near the crash site on Detroit's east side, the small airport also is known as City Airport.

The pilot suffered minor abrasions and was able to climb out of the plane. Detroit police spokeswoman Nicole Kirkwood told the Detroit Free Press that the woman on the ground who was electrocuted was in serious condition.

The Detroit News, citing city spokesman John Roach, reported the plane had been trailing a banner over crowds gathered for the annual fireworks. The plane came to rest with its nose on the pavement, just beyond a stop sign and near parked cars.

The Ford Fireworks is produced by The Parade Co. and included thousands of pyrotechnic effects visible for miles along the Detroit River between Detroit and Windsor, Ontario. It's the event's 58th year. Dearborn-based Ford Motor Co. has been the title sponsor since 2013.

Original article can be found here:  https://www.ksl.com







A single-engine plane that crashed Monday night near Coleman A. Young International Airport on Detroit’s east side ran out of fuel, forcing the emergency landing near Interstate 94 and Gratiot, according to police.

The plane struck a utility pole at about 9 p.m. at Shoemaker and Cooper, bringing down power lines. A 45-year-old woman on the ground was electrocuted by a live wire and was taken to Detroit Receiving Hospital in serious condition.

The 18-year-old male pilot suffered minor abrasions and was able to climb out of the plane.

The plane came to rest in the middle of a street in the residential area with its nose on the pavement, just beyond a stop sign. It missed some cars that were parked at the curb. There was no smoke or fire.

No one answered the phone at the airport late Monday. The facility at Conner and I-94 is formerly known as City Airport.

The plane had been trailing a banner over the crowds gathered Monday for the downtown fireworks and was returning to the airport when it went down, according to city spokesman John Roach. He didn’t know what happened to the banner.

Roach said the pilot was not taken into custody.

The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the crash, according to police.




NTSB Identification: CEN11LA182
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, February 12, 2011 in Trenton, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/18/2013
Aircraft: CESSNA 150L, registration: N6622G
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot had been conducting a banner towing operation for about 55 minutes when he felt a heavy vibration and heard a “loud bang.” The airplane's engine subsequently lost power, and the pilot executed a forced landing. 

During the forced landing, the nose landing gear collapsed when it contacted "heavy snow and unimproved terrain," resulting in substantial damage to the firewall. A postaccident examination of the engine revealed that one of the connecting rods had separated from the crankshaft. Metallurgical examination determined that one of the two connecting rod bolts had failed in overstress. The second connecting rod bolt was deformed but otherwise intact; its associated nut had separated from the bolt and was undamaged. The lack of damage to one of the connecting rod nuts in conjunction with the overstress failure of the opposing bolt was consistent with a loss of installation torque on the intact nut. The engine had accumulated 2,836 hours since overhaul. The operator did not supply engine overhaul maintenance records but provided a statement indicating that the installed bolts and nuts were new at the engine cylinder's last maintenance (an engine manufacturer service bulletin instructs that connecting rod bolts and nuts be replaced any time they are removed). However, due to the lack of maintenance records and the number of hours since last overhaul, the investigation could not conclusively attribute the loss of preload torque to the overhaul operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The loss of preload torque on a connecting rod nut and bolt, which precipitated a separation of the connecting rod from the engine's crankshaft and resulted in the total loss of engine power.

On February 12, 2011, about 1150, eastern standard time, a Cessna 150L airplane, N6622G, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Trenton, Michigan, following an in-flight loss of engine power. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant on board the airplane, reported no injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Drake Aerial Enterprises, LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a banner towing flight. Visual flight rules (VFR) conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operating on a flight plan. The local flight departed from the Oakland/Troy Airport, near Troy, Michigan, about 1100, and was destined for the Grosse Ile Municipal Airport, near Grosse Ile, Michigan.

The operator's accident report stated that the pilot was flying the airplane with a banner in tow for about 55 minutes when the pilot felt a heavy vibration and heard a loud bang. The airplane "instantly" lost power and the pilot was unable to "keep the engine running." He released the banner over an area away from people and structures and performed a forced landing. During the forced landing the nose landing gear collapsed when it contacted "heavy snow and unimproved terrain." Substantial damage occurred when the collapsed nose landing gear bent the firewall.

The airplane was a 1970 Cessna 150L, serial number 15072122, was an all-metal, high-wing, semimonocoque design airplane. The airplane was powered by a Lycoming O-360-A4A, serial number L-28947-35A, installed under supplemental type certificate SA4795SW. The installation was documented on a major repair and alteration form, dated December 8, 2003. The airplane was maintained under an annual inspection program and the operator reported that the airplane’s most recent annual inspection was conducted on February 7, 2010. The airplane reportedly accumulated 8,201 hours of total time and the engine accumulated 2,836 hours since overhaul

A postaccident examination of the engine revealed that the no. four connecting rod had separated from its crankshaft. One of the two corresponding connecting rod bolts was deformed. However, the associated nut had separated from the bolt and appeared undamaged. The second connecting rod bolt was fractured near the midpoint of the shank. Metallurgical examination of the fracture surface revealed features consistent with overstress separation.

The Lycoming Service Bulletin No. 240W, Mandatory Parts Replacement at Overhaul and During Repair or Maintenance, in part, stated:

AT OVERHAUL OR UPON REMOVAL: ... Any time the following parts are removed from any Lycoming reciprocating engine, it is mandatory that the following parts be replaced regardless of their apparent condition: ... Stressed bolts and fasteners, such as: ... Connecting rod bolts and nuts

The operator indicated that the installed connecting rod bolts and nuts were new when the last maintenance was performed on this cylinder.

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