Friday, May 6, 2016

Extra EA 300/L, N414MT, registered to KD Leasing LLC and operated by California Extreme Adventures LLC doing business as Sky Combat Ace: Fatal accident occurred October 21, 2017 in Alpine, San Diego County, California, California

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Registered to KD Leasing LLC

Operated by California Extreme Adventures LLC doing business as Sky Combat Ace

http://registry.faa.gov/N414MT 

NTSB Identification: WPR18FA013
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 21, 2017 in Four Corners, CA
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGPRODUKTIONS-UND EA 300/L, registration: N414MT
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 21, 2017, at 1611 Pacific daylight time, an Extra Flugzeugproduktions-Und EA 300/L, N414MT (Callsign Ace 5), collided with terrain within the watershed of the El Capitan Reservoir, near Four Corners, California. The flight instructor and passenger sustained fatal injuries and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to KD Leasing LLC., and operated by California Extreme Adventures LLC. (doing business as Sky Combat Ace), under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The local instructional flight departed Gillespie Field Airport, San Diego/El Cajon at 1557. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The operator's website described itself as an "extreme aviation attraction," providing a series of aviation related "experiences", including aerobatics, air combat, and flight training. The passenger had signed up for the 25-minute-long, "Top Gun" experience, which according to their website was a flight which included, "Advanced Aerobatics", "Basic Aerobatics", a "Low Level Bombing Run", "You Fly Maneuvers", and "You Fly Departure".

Preliminary radar data provided by the FAA indicated a target initiating a climbing left turn after departing from runway 17, and reaching a mode C reported altitude of about 4,700 ft mean sea level (msl), 5 miles northeast of the airport. For the next 10 minutes, the target followed a track along the general path of the San Diego River, then east of the El Capitan Reservoir, and north towards the town of Four Corners. The track followed a meandering path at varying airspeeds and altitudes ranging between 4,500 and 7,100 ft in a manner consistent with aerobatic maneuvers, and multiple witnesses along the route indicated seeing an airplane performing aerobatic-like maneuvers about that time.

At 1610 the target had reached its farthest point from the airport, just north of the reservoir. It then began to track back to the southwest, climbing from 5,000 ft to 6,900 ft over the next 90 seconds. About 15 seconds later, the last target was recorded just to the southeast at an altitude of 4,500 ft.

The accident site was located within the river valley, on a hillside slope at an elevation of about 775 ft, about 1,000 ft east of the last radar target. The primary wreckage consisted of a 4-ft-deep by 6-ft-wide crater which contained fragmented engine and airframe components. The outboard left wingtip rib, along with shards of the red position lamp were located about 14 ft west, with the corresponding right wingtip rib and green position lamp shards about the same distance to the east. The debris field continued about 75 ft downhill to the north, and contained the engine crankcase, instrument panel components, fragmented tubular airframe material, the crumpled tubular steel remains of the tail section, and burnt composite structure.

Most of the airplane's structure was consumed by fire, except for the right rear section of the canopy frame and about a dozen composite skin fragments which were interspersed in the surrounding trees and immediate vicinity of the impact site. The impact ignited a brushfire, which burnt about 45 acres of land northeast of the accident site along the flank of the adjacent hillside.

A secondary debris field was located in the dry river bed about 400 ft north of the crater. The debris was oriented east-west, about 800 ft long, and contained the left (lock side) and rear sections of the canopy frame, multiple pieces of canopy plexiglass material, and a fragmented headset. Neither the debris field, nor the canopy components displayed any indications of fire.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov




The two people killed in a plane crash near El Capitan Reservoir on Saturday were on a paid flight experience from a company that offers adrenaline-fueled rides for adventure seekers.

A spokeswoman for Sky Combat Ace identified the victims as Peter Gillcrist, one of the company’s pilots, and Garrett Engler.

“We would like to express our deepest condolences to the families who have lost loved ones and have been affected by this unfortunate accident,” said spokeswoman Megan Fazio in a statement. “We are devastated and extend our heartfelt sympathy to the families and to our (Sky Combat Ace) team members who have lost a beloved colleague and pilot.”

The EXTRA EA 300 plane took off from Gillespie Field about 3:50 p.m. When it failed to return, Sky Combat Ace employees notified air traffic control.

Sheriff’s and California Highway Patrol officials said 911 callers in the Lakeside area reported a possible crash east of El Monte Road about 4:20 p.m. The impact sparked a fire that charred 20 acres.

Debris from the crash was located about an hour later.

“To our knowledge, there were no distress calls made prior to the accident,” Fazio said.

Sky Combat Ace, which operates out of Las Vegas and San Diego, sells a variety of flight packages that include aerobatic and simulated “air combat” experiences.

“You’re not just a passenger on a joy ride. You are a steely-eyed fighter pilot at the controls of your very own ‘fighter jet,’ pulling Gs and squeezing the trigger to ‘get the kill,’ ” the company’s website reads.

It’s unclear which experience Engler had purchased or who was flying the plane at the time. Some flight packages allow the student to control the aircraft.

The aircraft, which was built in 2009, had up-to-date certification and was categorized for normal and acrobatic flights, federal records show.

The company said on its website that safety is its No. 1 priority, and stressed that the planes are expertly engineered and that pilots go through rigorous training. It also said that “air combat and low-level flying comes with an inherent amount of risk that cannot be entirely eliminated without jeopardizing the inherent nature of the experience.”

Gillcrist is the chief pilot for Sky Combat Ace’s San Diego location, according to the company’s website. After graduating from the University of Virginia, he worked at Lockheed Martin with the Skunk Works, an experimental engineering group that develops aircraft and associated technologies.

He later taught competitive aerobatics, emergency maneuver training and spin training.

A similar fatal crash involving the same company occurred in April 2016.

In that incident, a student passenger and an instructor pilot were performing “air combat” maneuvers when they crashed near Las Vegas. Fazio said the passenger had paid for the “Sky Combat” experience offered by the company, and that the crash happened as they were returning to the hangar.

The “Sky Combat” package allows the participant to fly the plane while the pilot teaches “air-to-air combat” techniques. It’s unclear who had control of the aircraft when it crashed, Fazio said at the time.

The National Transportation Safety Board is continuing to investigate Saturday’s crash.


http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com

A pilot and his passenger died when a small plane crashed near the El Capitan Reservoir Saturday afternoon, according to a spokesperson for the pilot's employer.

The victims were identified Monday as pilot Peter Gillcrist and passenger Garrett Engler, according to Sky Combat Ace spokesperson Megan Fazio. 

The men died after their plane crashed around 4:15 p.m. Saturday, sparking a 20-acre brush fire.

The National Transportation Safety Board identified the wreckage as a Extra EA 300/L.

Fazio said the plane was registered to KD Leasing and operated by California Extreme Adventures. 

Sky Combat Ace operates out of Henderson, Nevada, but has a location out of Gillespie Field, which is where the plane was headed Saturday. 

"To our knowledge, there were no distress calls made prior to the accident," Fazio said. 

The wreckage is in a remote area near the El Capitan Reservoir and was not accessible to ground crews Saturday.

Gillcrist, known as "Bandito" in the air, taught competitive aerobatics, emergency maneuver training, and spin training, according to the company. His mother was an aviation physiologist, his father was a Navy pilot and his wife is a pilot for Southwest Airlines.

The NTSB and Federal Aviation Administration have now taken over the investigation with the NTSB in the lead.

Sky Combat Ace locations are closed until further notice, Fazio said. 

"We are devastated and extend our heartfelt sympathy to the families and to our SCA team members who have lost a beloved colleague and pilot," she said in a written statement.


http://www.nbcsandiego.com

SAN DIEGO (NEWS 8) — New information emerged Sunday about a plane crash that sparked a brush fire in the East County. 

It happened around 4:15 p.m. on Saturday near the El Capitan Reservoir in Lakeside. 

But the crash site was difficult for crews to access. 

Firefighters brought in heavy equipment Sunday to access the wreckage of the Extra EA-300 plane.   

A spokesperson for the US Forestry Service called the crash "unsurvivable."   

The fire sparked by the crash burned 15 to 20 acres and it took several hours to get under control through a series of aerial drops and ground efforts.   

By Sunday, lines of retardant marked the hillside.   

An investigator with the NTSB arrived on scene Sunday to start the process of figuring out what went wrong.  

Federal records show the plane's tail number, given to News 8 by the NTSB, is registered to KD Leasing in Henderson, Nevada.   

It appears frequently on the website of Sky Combat Ace, a company that operates out of the Las Vegas area and Gillespie Field, offering thrill seekers the chance to ride as a passenger or even perform their own aerobatic stunts from the pilot's seat.   

There are several videos online showing this same plane in action over Las Vegas and the East County.   

Residents say they often see pilots performing stunts near the reservoir.   

So far investigators aren't saying how many people were on board, but the manufacturer says the plane is typically equipped with two seats.   

News 8 reached out to Sky Combat Ace's headquarters in Las Vegas, but no one answered the phone.   

On its website, the company says "safety has always been the #1 priority at SCA."


Story and video:  http://www.thecwsandiego.com




LAKESIDE (CNS) - Firefighters put out a small fire north of the El Capitan Reservoir in Lakeside and sheriff's deputies were securing the scene where a small plane crashed, authorities said Sunday.

The fire was first reported at 4:18 p.m. Saturday as the result of a possible plane crash, according to the California Highway Patrol.

The blaze was estimated at 20 acres by nightfall with its forward progress stopped, sheriff's officials said.

The flames were out and deputies were securing the scene until officials from the National Transportation Safety Board arrive to begin their investigation, sheriff's officials said.

The Federal Aviation Administration reported an EXTRA EA 300 plane with two people on board was missing after taking off from Gillespie Field in El Cajon, according to the San Diego Union Tribune.

Allen Kenitzer from the FAA Office of Communications gave the following statement to New 8 regarding the plane crash:

There was an aircraft accident Saturday at the North end of the El Capitan reservoir.  The aircraft registration and type is unknown at this time.  The number of people onboard also cannot be confirmed at this time. The FAA and the NTSB will investigate.


Story and video ➤  http://www.cbs8.com




A small plane crashed at the base of a remote hill near El Capitan Reservoir Saturday, presumably killing those onboard as no survivors were found, authorities said. 

The crash sparked a brush fire that had grown to about 20 acres shortly after nightfall.


Officials were not able to confirm what aircraft was down, but a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said the agency got a report of an EXTRA EA 300 plane with two people onboard missing from a local flight from Gillespie Field in El Cajon.


Sheriff’s and California Highway Patrol officials said 911 callers in the Lakeside area reported the possible crash east of El Monte Road about 4:20 p.m.


Some callers said they didn’t see the crash, but heard what they thought was an impact, then saw a fire.


Deputies headed that way and a sheriff’s helicopter scanned the area, finding the fire but no confirmation of a plane crash, sheriff’s Lt. Mario Zermeno said.


Authorities said they couldn’t get close to verify the possible wreckage while air crews were dropping retardant and water on the fire. It was about 7 p.m. before the debris was confirmed that of a plane, with few parts identifiable.


About 5:20 p.m., a Cal Fire air tanker crew working on the blaze reported seeing some type of debris in the area, Zermeno said.


U.S. Forest Service fire crews worked the blaze on the ground, as it was within the boundaries of the Cleveland National Forest east of the reservoir. The area is known as Four Corners.


The fire burned about 20 acres, forest service spokeswoman Wende Cornelius said.


Footage from News 8 showed the smokey fire at the base of steep, rugged hills, with air tankers and helicopters dropping water and fire retardant on the flames while it was still daylight.


According to Wikipedia, an EXTRA EA 300 is an aerobatic plane, usually a two-seater, built by Extra Flugzeugbau.


Original article  ➤ http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com


SAN DIEGO -- A plane crashed near the El Capitan Reservoir in Lakeside Saturday afternoon, sparking a brush fire.

The crash happened sometime after 4 p.m., according to Wende Cornelius, a spokesperson for Cleveland National Forest. Cornelius described the crash as "non-survivable."

Officials have not confirmed the type of aircraft that went down or how many people were onboard, but Allen Kenitzer, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesperson, said an EXTRA EA300 plane with two people onboard was reported missing from a local flight from Gillespie Field in El Cajon around 6:30 p.m.

The blaze, estimated to be 45 acres, was northeast of the reservoir.

No homes or structures were threatened by the fire.

Crews from Cal Fire, the San Diego Fire-Rescue Department and the Barona Fire Department were assisting the Cleveland National Forest in responding to the blaze.

Story and video ➤  http://fox5sandiego.com



A small plane has crashed into a hillside just east of the El Capitan Reservoir.

A Cleveland National Park spokesperson says the crash started a brush fire that had burned 30 acres by 8 p.m.

Ground fire crews are working to reach the site but they say it is very isolated.

Air tankers and helicopters are attacking the blaze from the air.

Authorities working on the crash include Cleveland National Fire, Calfire and two strike teams from San Diego Fire.

Allen Kenitzer, a spokesperson for the FAA told 10News "the aircraft registration and type is unknown at this time.  The number of people onboard also cannot be confirmed at this time."

He said the plane may have been flying from Gillespie Field in El Cajon, but all information was preliminary. The FAA and NTSB are investigating.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.10news.com

SAN DIEGO (NEWS 8) — New information emerged Sunday about a plane crash that sparked a brush fire in the East County. 

It happened around 4:15 p.m. on Saturday near the El Capitan Reservoir in Lakeside. 

But the crash site was difficult for crews to access. 

Firefighters brought in heavy equipment Sunday to access the wreckage of the Extra EA-300 plane.   

A spokesperson for the US Forestry Service called the crash "unsurvivable."   

The fire sparked by the crash burned 15 to 20 acres and it took several hours to get under control through a series of aerial drops and ground efforts.   

By Sunday, lines of retardant marked the hillside.   

An investigator with the NTSB arrived on scene Sunday to start the process of figuring out what went wrong.  

Federal records show the plane's tail number, given to News 8 by the NTSB, is registered to KD Leasing in Henderson, Nevada.   

It appears frequently on the website of Sky Combat Ace, a company that operates out of the Las Vegas area and Gillespie Field, offering thrill seekers the chance to ride as a passenger or even perform their own aerobatic stunts from the pilot's seat.   

There are several videos online showing this same plane in action over Las Vegas and the East County.   

Residents say they often see pilots performing stunts near the reservoir.   

So far investigators aren't saying how many people were on board, but the manufacturer says the plane is typically equipped with two seats.   

News 8 reached out to Sky Combat Ace's headquarters in Las Vegas, but no one answered the phone.   

On its website, the company says "safety has always been the #1 priority at SCA."


Story and video:  http://www.thecwsandiego.com




LAKESIDE (CNS) - Firefighters put out a small fire north of the El Capitan Reservoir in Lakeside and sheriff's deputies were securing the scene where a small plane crashed, authorities said Sunday.

The fire was first reported at 4:18 p.m. Saturday as the result of a possible plane crash, according to the California Highway Patrol.

The blaze was estimated at 20 acres by nightfall with its forward progress stopped, sheriff's officials said.

The flames were out and deputies were securing the scene until officials from the National Transportation Safety Board arrive to begin their investigation, sheriff's officials said.

The Federal Aviation Administration reported an EXTRA EA 300 plane with two people on board was missing after taking off from Gillespie Field in El Cajon, according to the San Diego Union Tribune.

Allen Kenitzer from the FAA Office of Communications gave the following statement to New 8 regarding the plane crash:

There was an aircraft accident Saturday at the North end of the El Capitan reservoir.  The aircraft registration and type is unknown at this time.  The number of people onboard also cannot be confirmed at this time. The FAA and the NTSB will investigate.


Story and video ➤  http://www.cbs8.com




Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA034
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 05, 2014 in Las Vegas, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/06/2017
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGPRODUKTIONS-UND EA 300, registration: N369XT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot reported that, while at 3,000 ft above ground level and on a long final to the runway, he advanced the propeller condition lever to full forward and that he then felt a loss of engine power. He checked that the mixture was full rich and that he had the center fuel tank selected. The propeller continued to windmill while he unsuccessfully attempted to restart the engine twice. He decided not to feather the propeller. The pilot realized that the airplane was not going to reach the runway and made a sudden left turn in an attempt to land on a road that paralleled the airport fence line. During the off-field landing, the right wing and landing gear sustained structural damage. 

Examination of the airplane revealed that fuel was present in the center and left wing fuel tanks but that the right wing fuel tank was empty. Examination of the propeller governor, engine, and airframe revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. A sound spectrum study of audio recorded by a GoPro camera onboard the airplane verified that, about 1 minute before the accident, the engine rpm began fluctuating and that it then steadily dropped off to about half the normal engine operating rpm by the time of impact. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A partial loss of engine power during cruise flight for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination of the engine did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

On November 5, 2014, at 1145 Pacific standard time, an Extra Flugzeugproducktions-UND, EA-300/L, N369XT, experienced a loss of engine power while on final approach to runway 35L, Henderson Executive Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada, and collided with terrain short of the runway. The airplane's right wing was substantially damaged; the commercial pilot and single passenger were uninjured. The airplane was registered to Unmanned Systems, Inc., and operated by Sky Combat Ace as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight . Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which originated from Henderson Executive Airport at 1100.

The pilot stated that while on long final to runway 35L, and was about 3,000 feet above ground level (agl) when he advanced the propeller condition lever to full forward. He then felt a loss of engine power. He checked that the mixture was full rich, and that he had the acro tank (center fuel tank) selected. The propeller continued to windmill while he attempted to restart the engine twice unsuccessfully. He did not feather the propeller. The pilot realized that he was not going to make the runway, and made a sudden left turn in an attempt to land on a road that parallels the airport fence line. The right wing and landing gear sustained structural damage during the off field landing. The pilot stated that the center fuel tank was 3/4 full (17 gal capacity), and the wing tanks were empty.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Inspector examined the airplane at the scene of the accident and reported that the right wing fuel tank was empty, the left wing fuel tank had about 2 inches of fuel in it, the center acro tank had about 14 inches of fuel, and the fuel selector was in the OFF position.

On November 7, 2014, a FAA inspector examined the engine and the attached propeller governor. The inspector found that the propeller control linkage was connected and functioned properly, positive rotation between the governor drive spline and the engine was verified, and positive oil flow was observed within the propeller governor oil ports.

On November 6, 2015, an NTSB investigator examined the airplane and engine. No preaccident anomalies with the engine, engine controls, or fuel system were identified.

The accident was captured on a GoPro camera that was mounted in the cockpit of the airplane and faced aft, viewing the occupants. The NTSB Vehicle Recorders Division performed a Sound Spectrum Study on the audio portion of the recording. The study stated that the strongest tone was steady while in cruise flight, which equates to engine speed of 2,360 rpm. About 1 minute before terrain impact the blade passage frequency oscillated over the next 12 seconds, and then the engine rpm steadily decreased to 1,205 at the time of terrain impact.



Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas, Nevada 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N369XT

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA034
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 05, 2014 in Las Vegas, NV
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGPRODUKTIONS-UND EA 300, registration: N369XT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.





On November 5, 2014, at 1145 Pacific standard time, an Extra Flugzeugproducktions-UND, EA-300/L, N369XT, experienced a loss of engine power while on final approach to runway 35L, Henderson Executive Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada, and collided with terrain short of the runway. The airplane's right wing was substantially damaged; the commercial pilot and single passenger were uninjured. The airplane was registered to Unmanned Systems, Inc., and operated by Sky Combat Ace as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight . Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which originated from Henderson Executive Airport at 1100.

The pilot stated that while on long final to runway 35L, and was about 3,000 feet above ground level (agl) when he advanced the propeller condition lever to full forward. He then felt a loss of engine power. He checked that the mixture was full rich, and that he had the acro tank (center fuel tank) selected. The propeller continued to windmill while he attempted to restart the engine twice unsuccessfully. He did not feather the propeller. The pilot realized that he was not going to make the runway, and made a sudden left turn in an attempt to land on a road that parallels the airport fence line. The right wing and landing gear sustained structural damage during the off field landing. The pilot stated that the center fuel tank was 3/4 full (17 gal capacity), and the wing tanks were empty.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Inspector examined the airplane at the scene of the accident and reported that the right wing fuel tank was empty, the left wing fuel tank had about 2 inches of fuel in it, the center acro tank had about 14 inches of fuel, and the fuel selector was in the OFF position.




On November 7, 2014, a FAA inspector examined the engine and the attached propeller governor. The inspector found that the propeller control linkage was connected and functioned properly, positive rotation between the governor drive spline and the engine was verified, and positive oil flow was observed within the propeller governor oil ports.

On November 6, 2015, an NTSB investigator examined the airplane and engine. No preaccident anomalies with the engine, engine controls, or fuel system were identified.

The accident was captured on a GoPro camera that was mounted in the cockpit of the airplane and faced aft, viewing the occupants. The NTSB Vehicle Recorders Division performed a Sound Spectrum Study on the audio portion of the recording. The study stated that the strongest tone was steady while in cruise flight, which equates to engine speed of 2,360 rpm. About 1 minute before terrain impact the blade passage frequency oscillated over the next 12 seconds, and then the engine rpm steadily decreased to 1,205 at the time of terrain impact.






NTSB Identification: WPR15LA034 
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi &  Commuter 
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 05, 2014 in Las Vegas,  NV
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGPRODUKTIONS-UND EA 300, registration: N369XT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 5, 2014, at 1145 Pacific standard time, an Extra Flugzeugproducktions-UND, EA-300/L, N369XT, experienced a partial loss of engine power while on final approach to runway 35L, Henderson Executive Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada, and collided with terrain short of the runway. The airplane's right wing was substantially damaged; the commercial pilot and single passenger were uninjured. The airplane was registered to Unmanned Systems, Inc., and operated by Sky Combat Ace under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which originated from Henderson Executive Airport at 1100.

The pilot stated that while on long final to runway 35L, about 3,000 feet above ground level (agl), he felt a loss of engine power. The propeller continued to windmill while he attempted to restart the engine twice unsuccessfully. He then executed a forced landing to flat desert terrain short of runway 35L. The right wing and landing gear sustained structural damage during the off field landing. The pilot stated that the center fuel tank was 3/4 full (17 gal capacity), and the wing tanks were empty. NTSB Identification: WPR15LA024 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 26, 2014 in Las Vegas, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/16/2016
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGPRODUKTIONS-UND EA 300/L, registration: N763DT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor was conducting an aerobatic demonstration flight for a pilot-rated passenger, during which the flight instructor was demonstrating the airplane’s characteristics to the pilot. The flight instructor reported that he performed a spin maneuver, and during the recovery, he felt the tension in the rudder pedal become completely slack. The pedal moved completely forward, and he realized that the rudder cable must have separated. During the subsequent emergency landing at a nearby airport, the flight instructor could not maintain directional control, and the airplane slid off the right side of the runway.

A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the rudder cable had separated. The rudder cable showed signatures indicative of a failure due to tension overstress. Several of the wire strands on the cable were damaged by rubbing wear and were either completely worn through or nearly worn through, compromising the cross-section of the cable. The Federal Aviation Administration had issued a special airworthiness information bulletin (SAIB) for this airplane about 3 years before the accident to address similar rudder cable failures. The SAIB recommended that, to mitigate risk, cable inspections should be completed and a protective hose should be installed. A review of the maintenance logbooks found no record indicating that the SAIB had been implemented, and no protective hose was found. The SAIB was not mandatory, and the operator, which operated flights for paying passengers, including aerobatics and air combat demonstrations, chose not to the comply with it. If the operator had chosen to comply with the SAIB, the rudder cable may not have failed.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The failure of the rudder cable due to tension overstress as a result of the cable’s strength being compromised by wear damage, which resulted in the flight instructor’s inability to maintain directional control during the landing roll. 

On October 26, 2014, about 1130 Pacific daylight time, an Extra Flugzeugproduktions, N763DT, experienced an in-flight rudder cable separation after recovering from an aerodynamic maneuver, and veered off the runway during the emergency landing at Mc Carran International Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada. Sky Combat Ace was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The flight instructor and pilot-rated passenger were not injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The aerobatic demonstration flight departed from the Henderson Executive Airport, Las Vegas about 1100. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed.

The flight instructor stated that the purpose of the flight was to take the passenger on an aerobatic introduction flight where he would demonstrate the characteristics of the airplane. He performed a spin maneuver, and during the recovery, he felt the tension in the rudder pedal become completely slack. The pedal moved completely forward, and he realized that the rudder cable must have separated. The flight instructor declared an emergency, and decided to land at Mc Carran International Airport due to their robust emergency facilities and less of a crosswind. The flight instructor further stated that during landing on runway 19R, he could not maintain directional control, and the airplane slid off the right side.

A post accident examination of the airplane was performed by an inspector from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). He found the area that the rudder cable had separated, and it was sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Materials Laboratory for further evaluation. The examination revealed that the rudder cable showed signatures indicative of a failure as a result of tension overstress. Several of the wire strands on the cable were damaged by rubbing wear. Several of the damaged strands were either completely worn through or nearly worn through, compromising the cross-section of the cable. There was no obvious indication of material transfer.

A Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB), CE-12-01 was issued in October 2011 to address some Extra Aircraft rudder cable failures. The SAIB stated that because the cables are made of stainless steel they are susceptible to corrosion and wear damage. The recommendation to mitigate risk was for cable inspections to be completed, and to install a protective hose on the cable. There was no record of implementation of this SAIB in the logbooks.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N330MT

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA097
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 30, 2016 in Henderson, NV
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGPRODUKTIONS-UND EA 300/L, registration: N330MT
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 30, 2016, about 1630 Pacific daylight time, an Extra Flugzeugproduktions UND, EA-300/L, N330MT, sustained substantial damage when it impacted mountainous terrain about 12 miles south of Henderson Executive Airport (HND), Las Vegas, Nevada. The airplane was registered to and operated by Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The airline transport pilot and passenger were fatally injured. Visual (VMC) meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The local business flight departed HND about 1600.

Information provided by the company representatives revealed that the accident airplane departed and rendezvoused with two other company airplanes to conduct a simulated air to air combat mission. Two airplanes at a time would maneuver against each other, while the other airplane observed from a safe distance. Following completion of their air combat profile, all three airplanes returned towards HND. The first two airplanes landed and realized that the third airplane behind them did not return. Subsequently, the company launched an airplane to conduct a search, and shortly thereafter, the wreckage was discovered near a hilltop.

Examination of the accident site by the National Transportation Safety Board, investigator-in-charge, revealed that the airplane impacted mountainous terrain on a 030 degree heading. All the major components of the airplane were located throughout the 800 foot long debris path.

The airplane was recovered to a secure facility for further examination.

Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N763DT

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA024
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 26, 2014 in Las Vegas, NV
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGPRODUKTIONS-UND EA 300/L, registration: N763DT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.
NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 26, 2014, about 1130 Pacific daylight time, an Extra Flugzeugproduktions, N763DT, experienced an in-flight rudder cable separation after recovering from an aerodynamic maneuver, and veered off the runway during the emergency landing at Mc Carran International Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada. Sky Combat Ace was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The flight instructor and pilot-rated passenger were not injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The aerobatic demonstration flight departed from the Henderson Executive Airport, Las Vegas about 1100. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed.

The flight instructor stated that the purpose of the flight was to take the passenger on an aerobatic introduction flight where he would demonstrate the characteristics of the airplane. He performed a spin maneuver, and during the recovery, he felt the tension in the rudder pedal become completely slack. The pedal moved completely forward, and he realized that the rudder cable must have separated. The flight instructor declared an emergency, and decided to land at Mc Carran International Airport due to their robust emergency facilities and less of a crosswind. The flight instructor further stated that during landing on runway 19R, he could not maintain directional control, and the airplane slid off the right side.

A post accident examination of the airplane was performed by an inspector from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). He found the area that the rudder cable had separated, and it was sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Materials Laboratory for further evaluation. The examination revealed that the rudder cable showed signatures indicative of a failure as a result of tension overstress. Several of the wire strands on the cable were damaged by rubbing wear. Several of the damaged strands were either completely worn through or nearly worn through, compromising the cross-section of the cable. There was no obvious indication of material transfer.

A Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB), CE-12-01 was issued in October 2011 to address some Extra Aircraft rudder cable failures. The SAIB stated that because the cables are made of stainless steel they are susceptible to corrosion and wear damage. The recommendation to mitigate risk was for cable inspections to be completed, and to install a protective hose on the cable. There was no record of implementation of this SAIB in the logbooks. 

http://registry.faa.gov/N369XT 

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA034 
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi &  Commuter 
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 05, 2014 in Las Vegas,  NV
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGPRODUKTIONS-UND EA 300, registration: N369XT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 5, 2014, at 1145 Pacific standard time, an Extra Flugzeugproducktions-UND, EA-300/L, N369XT, experienced a partial loss of engine power while on final approach to runway 35L, Henderson Executive Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada, and collided with terrain short of the runway. The airplane's right wing was substantially damaged; the commercial pilot and single passenger were uninjured. The airplane was registered to Unmanned Systems, Inc., and operated by Sky Combat Ace under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which originated from Henderson Executive Airport at 1100.

The pilot stated that while on long final to runway 35L, about 3,000 feet above ground level (agl), he felt a loss of engine power. The propeller continued to windmill while he attempted to restart the engine twice unsuccessfully. He then executed a forced landing to flat desert terrain short of runway 35L. The right wing and landing gear sustained structural damage during the off field landing. The pilot stated that the center fuel tank was 3/4 full (17 gal capacity), and the wing tanks were empty.


FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Las Vegas FSDO-19


The Sky Combat Ace stunt plane that crashed April 30 near Jean impacted a hilltop 12 miles south of Henderson Executive Airport, killing the pilot and his passenger and spreading debris for 800 feet, federal investigators said in a preliminary report Wednesday. 

The single-engine aircraft, an Extra EA-300/L registered to Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC, impacted mountainous terrain while heading northeast, according to the National Transportation Safety Board, investigator-in-charge.


The preliminary report did not mention a probable cause for the crash but said visual flight conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed. A factual report followed by an analysis and probable cause is expected to take eight months to a year to complete.


Pilot Ben Soyars, 37, of Las Vegas and Steve Peterson, 32, of Rohnert Park, California, died in the crash of blunt trauma injuries, the Clark County coroner’s office has said.


Peterson was among 12 men who had traveled to Las Vegas for a bachelor party and had planned to take simulated, air-to-air combat flights on Sky Combat Ace planes with an “instructor” pilot in the back seat of each of the three aircraft and their “student” passengers in the front seat of each cockpit.


But with thunderstorms lurking near Henderson Executive Airport about 4 p.m. on April 30, members of the bachelor party had questioned the Sky Combat Ace refund policy. It says essentially that customers must go on the flights with the company’s instructor pilots or forfeit their fare money. So rather than lose more than $8,000 that the group had ponied up for the flights, three of nine who had planned to go departed in three of the company’s planes about 4:30 p.m.


“Information provided by the company representatives revealed that the accident plane departed and rendezvoused with two other company airplanes to conduct a simulated air to air combat mission,” the NTSB report says. “Two airplanes at a time would maneuver against each other while the other airplane observed from a safe distance.”


After the simulated air-combat maneuvers, all three aircraft returned toward the Henderson airport. But after the first two airplanes landed “and realized that the third airplane behind them did not return … the company launched an airplane to conduct a search,” the report reads.


The wreckage was discovered a short time later near a hilltop.


All major components of the airplane were located in the debris path, according to the preliminary investigation report.


Sky Combat Ace President Richard Coe has not returned phone calls to the Las Vegas Review-Journal seeking comment.


Original article can be found here: http://www.reviewjournal.com



Steven Anthony "Scuba" PETERSON
 (1983 - 2016)



Steven Anthony "Scuba" Peterson, of Rohnert Park passed away on April 30, 2016 at the age of 32. Steve was born on October 5, 1983 in Santa Rosa, CA to Robert and Jackie Peterson, and was a lifelong resident of Sonoma County. Steve grew up in Rohnert Park and graduated from Rancho Cotati High School in 2002. It was in high school that Steve developed a passion for working with his hands and tools on engines. He made a career for himself at Peterson CAT where he went through extensive schooling and training to become a certified Electric Power Generation Technician, in which he worked on large diesel engines and generators; often times keeping hospitals powered during emergencies, and being called upon 24 hours a days seven days a week in response to urgent situations requiring his expertise. Steve's strong work ethic and his positive attitude during challenging times were admired by all those around him. Steve was a genuine friend, loving brother and son, and devoted husband who always made family and friends his top priority. Many looked to Steve and depended on him for support and guidance in all aspects of life. He was extremely passionate about the outdoors, and enjoyed hunting, fishing, and diving in his spare time. He made a point of living every moment to its fullest. Steve is survived by his wife, Jennifer Leah, their unborn daughter Avery Rose, his parents Robert and Jackie, his older brother Mike, his twin brother Chris, and twin sisters Christine and Jennifer. Steve's spirit brought so much love, joy, and laughter to all those he encountered. He will forever be remembered and greatly missed by all that knew him. A memorial service will be held at Pleasant Hill Memorial Park, 1700 Pleasant Hill Rd., Sebastopol, CA 95472 at 11:00 a.m., Saturday May 7, 2016. 

The family requests that any donations in Steven's memory be made at: http://gofundme.com/stevenpeterson 



Benjamin Anderson Soyars, III
October 10, 1978 - April 30, 2016 
Resided in Las Vegas, NV 

Obituary
Benjamin Anderson Soyars, III, "Ben", age 37, died on Saturday, April 30th, 2016 while living in Nevada. He was the son of Benjamin A. Soyars, Jr. and Ellen H. Soyars; brother of Lindsay Soyars Ward & her husband, Casey; and uncle of Catherine Finley Ward. He also leaves behind his long-time love, Charity Elam and her daughter Wynnter of Richmond.

Ben grew up in Warrenton and attended Highland School before leaving for prep school and college. He then moved to Arizona to attend flight school. Ever since boyhood, Ben had a passion for flying. He was a highly accomplished pilot and instructor logging over 9, 000 hours in various types of planes, from small aerobatic aircraft to corporate jets. He will be remembered by many for his bright smile, his quick wit, and his engaging personality.


A memorial gathering will be held at the Airlie Conference Center Smokehouse, 6809 Airlie Rd., Warrenton, VA 20187 on Saturday, May 21st, 2016 from 1 to 4 pm, where family and friends are invited to share stories, pictures and memories of times spent together with Ben.


A Sky Combat Ace stunt plane sits on truck bed after its pilot made an emergency landing Oct. 26, 2014 at McCarran International Airport with a passenger on board. National Transportation Safety Board investigators determined that the pilot experienced a control issue with the aircraft during spin maneuver when a rudder cable failed.


Sky Combat Ace instructor pilot Ben Soyars, 37, of Las Vegas, is shown with an unidentified person in an August 2015 post from his Facebook page. Soyars and Steve Peterson, 32, of Rohnert Park, Calif., (not shown) were killed Saturday when their plane crashed near Jean. (Ben Soyar/Facebook)


Sky Combat Ace instructor pilot Ben Soyars, 37, of Las Vegas, right, is shown with an unidentified person in an August 2015 post from his Facebook page. Soyars and Steve Peterson, 32, of Rohnert Park, Calif., (not shown) were killed Saturday when their plane crashed near Jean. (Ben Soyar/Facebook)


Officials from the Clark County Department of Aviation, Clark County Fire Department, Henderson Fire Department, and Henderson Police Department respond to an airplane crash at the southern edge of the Henderson Executive Airport in Henderson on Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014. 



The same stunt plane that crashed Saturday, killing a Sky Combat Ace pilot and his passenger, had been involved in a dangerous, low-flying maneuver in 2015 over the Colorado River south of Hoover Dam, according to Federal Aviation Administration officials.


A pending enforcement action letter, obtained by the Las Vegas Review-Journal through a Freedom of Information Act request, proposes to suspend the commercial pilot and flight instructor certificates of Denis Richard Boissonneault of Las Vegas for 135 days for violating FAA regulations during a March 16, 2015, flight from Henderson Executive Airport.


“On takeoff … you abruptly pitched up the aircraft in a manner not normal for takeoff of an Extra,” the letter reads, referring to the Extra EA300 aircraft with tail No. N330MT.


The letter also states Boissonneault executed “an aileron roll,” commonly known as a barrel roll, “below 1,500 feet above the surface over the Colorado River.”


An FAA official familiar with the incident said Thursday the FAA was alerted to the low, aerobatic flight by Bureau of Reclamation police at Hoover Dam who saw the plane flying south of the dam.


The FAA official said Boissonneault had a passenger in the plane and that such maneuvers below 1,500 feet above the surface are prohibited by FAA regulations.


“Your operation of N330MT, in the manner and circumstances … was careless or reckless so as to endanger the life or property of another,” reads the Sept. 9, 2015, letter to Boissonneault.


Attempts to reach Boissonneault on Thursday were unsuccessful.


Messages seeking comment from Sky Combat Ace President Richard “Tex” Coe left on the company’s answering machine also were not returned.


A profile of Denis “Smokey” Boissonneault on Sky Combat Ace’s website says, “His favorite thing to do is to share his passion with anyone who wants to learn about the joy of flight, particularly advanced aerobatics!”


FAA officials confirmed that the two-seat, single-engine aircraft Boissonneault flew south of Hoover Dam on March 16, 2015, is the same one that crashed Saturday near Jean killing a passenger, Steve Peterson, 32, of Rohnert Park, California, and Sky Combat Ace instructor pilot Ben Soyars, 37, of Las Vegas.


BACHELOR PARTY DEATHS


Peterson and his twin brother, Chris Peterson, were among 12 friends who had traveled to Las Vegas for a bachelor party. Nine from the group were supposed to fly in at least three Sky Combat Ace stunt planes as part of a simulated air-combat and bombing run experience they had planned months in advance through Vegas Extreme Adventures.


With thunderstorms in the area, some members of the group declined to go on the flights. But Steve Peterson and two others decided to go to avoid forfeiting the more than $8,000 in fares in keeping with the company’s non-refund policy, one member of the group has said.


The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating Saturday’s fatal stunt plane accident near Jean. The FAA is also investigating Sky Combat Ace on legal grounds to see if the company was in compliance with its regulations at the time of Saturday’s accident.


Vegas Extreme Adventures, which does business as Sky Combat Ace, had issued a statement after Saturday’s plane crash saying the company has provided “instructional aerobatic airplane rides to the general public since 2011 and has conducted over 15,000 incident-free flights over the last 5 years.”


When asked about its “incident-free” claim Tuesday, Vegas Extreme Adventures publicist Megan Fazio released a revised statement that reads, “Up until this tragic accident on April 30th, 2016, there have been exactly zero injuries to customers at Sky Combat Ace. That is 5 years and 15,000 flights.”


Records obtained by the Review-Journal, however, show there have been two close-call incidents in which pilots and passengers narrowly escaped injuries. And, there have been numerous complaints about Sky Combat Ace’s flights over Henderson neighborhoods and elsewhere in Southern Nevada filed with local authorities and the FAA.


RECORD OF PROBLEMS


On Oct. 26, 2014, a Sky Combat Ace stunt plane made an emergency landing at McCarran International Airport with a passenger on board after performing an aerobatic spin maneuver. National Transportation Safety Board investigators determined that the pilot’s control problem stemmed from a rudder cable that had failed.


The next month, a Sky Combat Ace aircraft was forced to land on a street near the Henderson airport after the pilot experienced a partial loss of engine power. The accident caused substantial damage to the plane’s right wing.


FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said Sky Combat Ace had been granted a waiver in 2011 to carry passengers for hire while flying in formation but the waiver was suspended for a month in 2012 after the agency investigated a complaint that the company’s aircraft flew in formation at 500 feet above ground level contrary to provisions of the waiver.


The waiver was revoked Aug. 30, 2012, “based on a second complaint involving low-flying aircraft near the Hoover Dam,” Gregor said.


Las Vegas trial lawyer Robert W. Cottle said Thursday he is representing a mechanic in a claim against Sky Combat Ace. He said his client was run over in January by a Sky Combat Ace plane that was taxiing at the south end of the Henderson Airport.


“Fortunately he’s alive,” Cottle said about the mechanic who works for an air service company at the airport.


“He turned around to catch the red plane in the corner of his eye. That’s when the plane ran over the top of him and his foot was struck by the wheel,” he said, adding that the mechanic remained flat on the tarmac to avoid being struck by the propeller.


Original article can be found here:  http://www.reviewjournal.com 



 LAS VEGAS - The two men killed when a stunt plane crashed near Las Vegas were performing “air combat” maneuvers as part of a paid flight experience provided by a tourism company catering to extreme adventure-seekers.

Benjamin Anderson Soyars of Las Vegas, and Steve Anthony Peterson of Rohnert Park, California, died Saturday of blunt force injuries, according to the Clark County Coroner’s office. Their deaths have been ruled an accident.

The company, Sky Combat Ace, on its website describes Soyars, 37, as a veteran pilot with a background in competition and airshow flying. The company allows customers to fly stunt planes with instructors’ supervision.

The company didn’t identify the two men by name but said it was a student passenger and an instructor pilot.

It’s unclear who was flying the plane at the time of the crash.

“I cannot say who was in control at the time of the accident, as that would be speculation,” company spokesman Megan Fazio said Monday. “We won’t have the results until the FAA releases them following the completion of the investigation.”

The company said it has been providing instructional aerobatic airplane rides since 2011 and has had 15,000 incident-free flights in the past five years.

Fazio said the passenger paid for and had performed the “Sky Combat” experience and that the accident happened as they were returning to the hangar. The website indicates the tour package allows the student to fly the plane while the instructor teaches “the art of aerial dogfighting.” No other planes were involved.

The parent company, Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC, said in a statement that the fixed-wing single-engine plane took off from Henderson Executive Airport at 4 p.m. Saturday but didn’t return from its outing on time. They learned of the crash about 4:45 p.m., after calling air traffic control to report the missing Extra 300 airplane. No distress calls were made before the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration said it’s investigating. Records show the aircraft’s airworthiness was classified standard and categorized for normal and acrobatic flights. It was built in 2011 and had up to date certification.

The National Transportation Safety Board was also called to investigate but couldn’t immediately provide details.

http://www.rgj.com





CLARK COUNTY (KTNV) - A man from California was one of two people killed in a plane crash in rural Clark County Saturday evening.

The incident happened several miles east of I-15 near Jean, near State Route 604 and Southern Nevada Liteweight Road.


The plane is a Extra EA-330LC. Records indicate the plane belonged to a Henderson company called Vegas Extreme Adventures, also known as Sky Combat Ace. The business offers customers acrobatic stunt rides.


One of the plane's occupants was identified as 32-year-old Steve Peterson of Rohnert Park, Calif. 13 Action News learned Peterson leaves behind a pregnant wife who's expecting a baby in June.


A student pilot at the facility said this was a shocking tragedy.


"My heart just sank," said Dan Koury. "Right away it was just like oh my God, it's a tragedy for anyone to die in a plane crash but somehow it hits closer to home when you know the people who are out there. It's just a really sick feeling to my stomach."


According to a statement from Vegas Extreme Adventures, the plane took off from Henderson Executive Airport around 4 p.m. When the aircraft failed to return on time, employees notified air traffic control of the missing airplane and immediately launched an aircraft for search and rescue operations.


At approximately 4:45 p.m., the crash site was located and called in to the Henderson Executive Airport Control Tower, who in turn notified emergency personnel of the location of the crash near the Jean dry lakebed.


There was 1 student passenger and 1 instructor pilot onboard the plane. When emergency responders arrived, both occupants were pronounced dead at the scene. To Vegas Extreme Adventures' knowledge, there were no distress calls made prior to the accident.


"On behalf of all Vegas Extreme Adventures employees and staff, we would like to express our deepest condolences to the families who have lost loved ones and have been affected by this unfortunate accident," according to the statement. "Vegas Extreme Adventures is working closely and cooperating with the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board to determine the cause of the accident."


According to the statement, Vegas Extreme Adventures has been providing instructional aerobatic airplane rides to the general public since 2011 and has conducted more than 15,000 incident-free flights over the last 5 years.


Story and video:  http://www.ktnv.com




LAS VEGAS (FOX5) -  A plane involved in a deadly crash Saturday  evening originated from Henderson Executive Airport. 

The company, Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC, released a statement Sunday following the crash. 

According to the statement, an Extra EA-330LC plane registered to Vegas Extreme Adventures left from Henderson Executive Airport at about 4 p.m. Saturday. When the aircraft did not return on time, employees notified air traffic control of the missing plane, and immediately launched an aircraft for search and rescue operations. 

The crash site was located about 4:45 p.m., and Henderson Executive Airport was notified of the crash site near the Jean dry lake bed, the statement said. 

An instructor pilot, and student passenger were aboard the plane, and pronounced dead at the scene by emergency personnel, the statement said. The company did not release the identities of the deceased. 

The company said it was not aware of any distress calls prior to the crash. 

The statement said the company is working with the Federal Aviation Administration, and the National Transportation Safety Board to determine the cause of the crash. 

Vegas Extreme Adventures said it has been providing instructional aerobatic airplane rides to the general public since 2011. The company said it has conducted more than 15,000 incident-free flights during the past five years. 

Story and video: http://www.fox5vegas.com


A single-engine aircraft that crashed Saturday amid dark skies and rain, killing an instructor pilot and a passenger, belonged to a tourism fighter plane company that allows customers to operate planes with instructors’ assistance.

Authorities were alerted about 5 p.m. Saturday that an Extra EA-330LC aircraft belonging to Sky Combat Ace had crashed minutes earlier about 4 miles east of Las Vegas Boulevard and a half-mile south of 8 Mile Mine Road, Henderson Executive Airport spokeswoman Linda Healey said Sunday. Earlier reports had suggested the crash occurred farther south.


The plane had taken off about 4 p.m., said Megan Fazio of Sky Combat Ace's parent company, Vegas Extreme Adventures. The company sent out a search plane, then learned just after 4:45 p.m. that the missing plane had crashed near a Jean dry lake bed, Fazio said. Both people killed in the crash were men, she said; the Clark County Coroner’s office will identify them.


No distress calls were received from the plane, Fazio said.


About the same time the plane took off, thunderstorms moving southwest from Boulder City were blanketing the area of the crash, National Weather Service meteorologist Caleb Steele said Sunday. The plane “almost certainly” would have been flying in stormy weather if it was anywhere near the area of the crash, he said.


Sky Combat Ace, which operates out of Henderson as well as Gillespie Field near San Diego, bills itself as offering a “whole new level of adrenaline” on its website and touts a “perfect safety record,” with no injuries reported since its opening in 2011. It also states that it operates “7 days a week, 365 days a year."


The company compares the passenger experience to that of “a steely-eyed fighter pilot at the controls of your very own fighter jet, pulling Gs and squeezing the trigger.” It says its planes are equipped with dual flight controls, allowing an instructor pilot to take over in the “unlikely event that it becomes necessary."


Metro Police and the Clark County Fire Department did not respond to questions about whether a passenger or a pilot was in control at the time of the crash. A sign at Sky Combat Ace's Henderson office said the business will be closed until May 9.


The National Transportation Safety Board is taking over the investigation, Healey said.


Original article can be found here:  http://lasvegassun.com





LAS VEGAS (KSNV News3LV) — Two people were killed Saturday afternoon when an acrobatic aircraft crashed near the California state line.

The plane was identified as an Extra EA-330LC.

The tail number, N330MT, is registered to Vegas Extreme Adventures, LLC and the registration says it was usually flown out of Henderson Executive Airport.

Vegas Extreme Adventures released a statement, with the following:

On behalf of all Vegas Extreme Adventures employees and staff, we would like to express our deepest condolences to the families who have lost loved ones and have been affected by this unfortunate accident. Vegas Extreme Adventures is working closely and cooperating with the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board to determine the cause of the accident.  Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC has been providing instructional aerobatic airplane rides to the general public since 2011 and has conducted over 15,000 incident-free flights over the last 5 years.

Metro said it received a call that a small single-engine plane went down in the area west of the dry lake beds near Jean, about 5 p.m.

Because of the weather and remote location, Metro Search and Rescue were responding for assistance and recovery, along with the Clark County Fire Department.

CCFD Chief John Steinbeck says Engine 65 was first on the scene, but that it was difficult to find, about four miles east of Las Vegas Blvd near 8 Mile Rd.

Chief Steinbeck says arriving responders found two people deceased at the scene, with one still in their seat and the other thrown 40 feet from the plane.

McCarran Airport said the plane went down about nine miles south of Henderson Executive Airport and was reported to authorities by the pilot of another aircraft.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.

The Clark County coroner's office will release the names of the two killed after relatives have been notified.

Story and video:  http://news3lv.com




Two people were killed Saturday when a single-engine plane crashed Saturday evening near the state line and Nipton Road, Las Vegas police said.

Police and emergency crews responded to the area after receiving a call about a small single-engine plane that crashed about 5 p.m., Metro said.

An initial report said the crash had occurred west of the dry lake beds near Jean, but Metro later said the location was “best described as State Line and Nipton Road.”

Arriving emergency crews located two deceased occupants, police said just after 6 p.m.

McCarran International Airport spokeswoman Linda Healy said the plane was a single-engine EXTRA EA300. The Clark County Fire Department responded to the scene, she said.

According to its website, EXTRA is a manufacturer of aerobatic airplanes and variants of the EA300 are flown by demonstration teams for companies like Red Bull and Breitling.

Details were not immediately available about where the plane was coming from or where it was headed, or if the weather played a role in the crash.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash, police said.

Original article can be found here: http://www.reviewjournal.com  

A plane operated by a company that lets customers engage in mock dogfights made an emergency landing on a Henderson street today after possibly experiencing a mechanical problem, officials said.

The Extra 330 LC plane was carrying two people when it landed on Volunteer Boulevard, stopping at the southern perimeter fence of Henderson Executive Airport, said Christine Crews, a spokeswoman for the Clark County Department of Aviation.

Nobody was hurt, but the aircraft sustained major damage, Crews said.

The plane, operated by Sky Combat Ace, took off from the airport at 11:15 a.m., according to a statement from the company. At about 11:40 a.m., air traffic controllers reported the pilot had declared an emergency and had to land.

City of Henderson spokeswoman Kathleen Richards said the aircraft may have had a mechanical issue but the cause of the problem would be determined by the National Transportation Safety Board.

On idle power, the plane was able to glide and descend for about two miles before landing about a quarter mile short of the airport runway, the company said. Henderson police and firefighters responded.

There was one Sky Combat Ace employee and one passenger on board, the company statement said.

Sky Combat Ace allows customers to engage in aerial dogfights and maneuver the aircraft once they reach 6,000 feet, company spokeswoman Megan Fazio said. Customers are not involved in takeoffs or landings, she said.

Sky Combat Ace is working with the Federal Aviation Administration and the NTSB to determine the cause of the incident, the company said.

In more than three years of operations and with in excess of 14,000 customer flights, Sky Combat Ace has not had an aircraft accident, the company said. Its pilots are trained for emergency landings, the statement said.

Story, comments and photo gallery: http://www.lasvegassun.com









HENDERSON, NV (FOX5) -  A small plane landed on a road near the Henderson Executive Airport on Wednesday morning.

Christine Crews, of McCarran International Airport, said the Extra 330 private aircraft landed near the intersection of Volunteer Boulevard and Executive Airport Road around 11:50 a.m., about a quarter-mile short of the runway.

Crews said the plane ended up crashing into the fence that surrounds the airport. She said the pilot did not contact the tower before the crash, but did after the landing to let authorities know about the situation.

No injuries were reported, Crews said.

A crane has been called in to remove the aircraft from the road, Crews said.

Crews said the National Transportation Safety Board will conduct an investigation.

Story and Comments: http://www.fox5vegas.com




Henderson, NV (KTNV) -- A small plane landed just short of the airport on Wednesday. 

Around 11:46 a.m. an EXTRA 330 aircraft with 2 people on board made a hard landing in Henderson.

The plane came down on Volunteer Boulevard and went into the fence surrounding Henderson Executive Airport, about one-fourth of a mile short of the runway.

There were no injuries or fire, but the plane did have major damage.

The pilot did not call into the control tower prior to the landing, so there are no details yet as to why the plane went down.

The plane, operated by Sky Combat Ace, has released the following statement:

Sky Combat Ace is working closely with the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board and the investigation to determine the cause of the incident and will release the final cause upon completion of the investigation.

The FAA, The National Transportation Safety Board, Fire, police, EMS and medical examiners were on call per airport protocol and responded immediately after Air Traffic Control gained knowledge of where the plane was going to land. The area is sealed off and restricted only to those personnel. Sky Combat Ace personnel are also at the site and are doing everything they can to be helpful to the investigation.

Volunteer Boulevard is currently closed.

- Source:  http://www.jrn.com 


 HENDERSON (KSNV MyNews3.com) – A small plane affiliated with Sky Combat Ace made an emergency landing Wednesday morning near Henderson Executive Airport. 

 The Extra 330 with two people aboard was forced to land just after 11:45 a.m. about a quarter-mile south of Henderson Runway 3/5L on Volunteer Boulevard near Via Inspirada, said Christine Crews, spokesperson for the Clark County Aviation Department, which operates the airport. The pilot then steered the aircraft into the perimeter fence.

Both people aboard were unharmed and left the aircraft on their own power. The plane sustained major damage, Crews said. According to the FAA, the plane is registered to “Unmanned Systems Inc.” based in Henderson.

"Sky Combat Ace is working closely with the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board and the investigation to determine the cause of the incident and will release the final cause upon completion of the investigation," according to a statement released for the company by Neon Public Relations.

"The FAA, The National Transportation Safety Board, Fire, police, EMS and medical examiners were on call per airport protocol and responded immediately after Air Traffic Control gained knowledge of where the plane was going to land. The area is sealed off and restricted only to those personnel. Sky Combat Ace personnel are also at the site and are doing everything they can to be helpful to the investigation."

The pilot did not contact the tower until after the plane landed, Crews said. Names of the pilot and passenger were not released.

The Henderson Police and Fire departments responded to the accident.


- Source:  http://www.mynews3.com 

HENDERSON, Nev. — A small plane crashed into a fence Wednesday morning on the outskirts of the Henderson Executive Airport. 

Two people were onboard but were not hurt in the crash, officials said.

The two-seater struck a fence off Volunteer Boulevard just before noon. No cars were involved.

The plane is owned by Sky Combat Ace, which operates out of the airport. In a news release, the company said it was working with the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board in the crash investigation.

The pilot worked for Sky Combat Ace, a release said.

Other details surrounding the crash, including the cause, have not been released.

Story and Comments:  http://www.8newsnow.com

















Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas, Nevada 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N369XT

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA034
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 05, 2014 in Las Vegas, NV
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGPRODUKTIONS-UND EA 300, registration: N369XT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.





On November 5, 2014, at 1145 Pacific standard time, an Extra Flugzeugproducktions-UND, EA-300/L, N369XT, experienced a loss of engine power while on final approach to runway 35L, Henderson Executive Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada, and collided with terrain short of the runway. The airplane's right wing was substantially damaged; the commercial pilot and single passenger were uninjured. The airplane was registered to Unmanned Systems, Inc., and operated by Sky Combat Ace as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight . Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which originated from Henderson Executive Airport at 1100.

The pilot stated that while on long final to runway 35L, and was about 3,000 feet above ground level (agl) when he advanced the propeller condition lever to full forward. He then felt a loss of engine power. He checked that the mixture was full rich, and that he had the acro tank (center fuel tank) selected. The propeller continued to windmill while he attempted to restart the engine twice unsuccessfully. He did not feather the propeller. The pilot realized that he was not going to make the runway, and made a sudden left turn in an attempt to land on a road that parallels the airport fence line. The right wing and landing gear sustained structural damage during the off field landing. The pilot stated that the center fuel tank was 3/4 full (17 gal capacity), and the wing tanks were empty.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Inspector examined the airplane at the scene of the accident and reported that the right wing fuel tank was empty, the left wing fuel tank had about 2 inches of fuel in it, the center acro tank had about 14 inches of fuel, and the fuel selector was in the OFF position.




On November 7, 2014, a FAA inspector examined the engine and the attached propeller governor. The inspector found that the propeller control linkage was connected and functioned properly, positive rotation between the governor drive spline and the engine was verified, and positive oil flow was observed within the propeller governor oil ports.

On November 6, 2015, an NTSB investigator examined the airplane and engine. No preaccident anomalies with the engine, engine controls, or fuel system were identified.

The accident was captured on a GoPro camera that was mounted in the cockpit of the airplane and faced aft, viewing the occupants. The NTSB Vehicle Recorders Division performed a Sound Spectrum Study on the audio portion of the recording. The study stated that the strongest tone was steady while in cruise flight, which equates to engine speed of 2,360 rpm. About 1 minute before terrain impact the blade passage frequency oscillated over the next 12 seconds, and then the engine rpm steadily decreased to 1,205 at the time of terrain impact.






NTSB Identification: WPR15LA034 
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi &  Commuter 
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 05, 2014 in Las Vegas,  NV
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGPRODUKTIONS-UND EA 300, registration: N369XT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 5, 2014, at 1145 Pacific standard time, an Extra Flugzeugproducktions-UND, EA-300/L, N369XT, experienced a partial loss of engine power while on final approach to runway 35L, Henderson Executive Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada, and collided with terrain short of the runway. The airplane's right wing was substantially damaged; the commercial pilot and single passenger were uninjured. The airplane was registered to Unmanned Systems, Inc., and operated by Sky Combat Ace under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which originated from Henderson Executive Airport at 1100.

The pilot stated that while on long final to runway 35L, about 3,000 feet above ground level (agl), he felt a loss of engine power. The propeller continued to windmill while he attempted to restart the engine twice unsuccessfully. He then executed a forced landing to flat desert terrain short of runway 35L. The right wing and landing gear sustained structural damage during the off field landing. The pilot stated that the center fuel tank was 3/4 full (17 gal capacity), and the wing tanks were empty. NTSB Identification: WPR15LA024 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 26, 2014 in Las Vegas, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/16/2016
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGPRODUKTIONS-UND EA 300/L, registration: N763DT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor was conducting an aerobatic demonstration flight for a pilot-rated passenger, during which the flight instructor was demonstrating the airplane’s characteristics to the pilot. The flight instructor reported that he performed a spin maneuver, and during the recovery, he felt the tension in the rudder pedal become completely slack. The pedal moved completely forward, and he realized that the rudder cable must have separated. During the subsequent emergency landing at a nearby airport, the flight instructor could not maintain directional control, and the airplane slid off the right side of the runway.

A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the rudder cable had separated. The rudder cable showed signatures indicative of a failure due to tension overstress. Several of the wire strands on the cable were damaged by rubbing wear and were either completely worn through or nearly worn through, compromising the cross-section of the cable. The Federal Aviation Administration had issued a special airworthiness information bulletin (SAIB) for this airplane about 3 years before the accident to address similar rudder cable failures. The SAIB recommended that, to mitigate risk, cable inspections should be completed and a protective hose should be installed. A review of the maintenance logbooks found no record indicating that the SAIB had been implemented, and no protective hose was found. The SAIB was not mandatory, and the operator, which operated flights for paying passengers, including aerobatics and air combat demonstrations, chose not to the comply with it. If the operator had chosen to comply with the SAIB, the rudder cable may not have failed.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The failure of the rudder cable due to tension overstress as a result of the cable’s strength being compromised by wear damage, which resulted in the flight instructor’s inability to maintain directional control during the landing roll. 

On October 26, 2014, about 1130 Pacific daylight time, an Extra Flugzeugproduktions, N763DT, experienced an in-flight rudder cable separation after recovering from an aerodynamic maneuver, and veered off the runway during the emergency landing at Mc Carran International Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada. Sky Combat Ace was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The flight instructor and pilot-rated passenger were not injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The aerobatic demonstration flight departed from the Henderson Executive Airport, Las Vegas about 1100. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed.

The flight instructor stated that the purpose of the flight was to take the passenger on an aerobatic introduction flight where he would demonstrate the characteristics of the airplane. He performed a spin maneuver, and during the recovery, he felt the tension in the rudder pedal become completely slack. The pedal moved completely forward, and he realized that the rudder cable must have separated. The flight instructor declared an emergency, and decided to land at Mc Carran International Airport due to their robust emergency facilities and less of a crosswind. The flight instructor further stated that during landing on runway 19R, he could not maintain directional control, and the airplane slid off the right side.

A post accident examination of the airplane was performed by an inspector from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). He found the area that the rudder cable had separated, and it was sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Materials Laboratory for further evaluation. The examination revealed that the rudder cable showed signatures indicative of a failure as a result of tension overstress. Several of the wire strands on the cable were damaged by rubbing wear. Several of the damaged strands were either completely worn through or nearly worn through, compromising the cross-section of the cable. There was no obvious indication of material transfer.

A Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB), CE-12-01 was issued in October 2011 to address some Extra Aircraft rudder cable failures. The SAIB stated that because the cables are made of stainless steel they are susceptible to corrosion and wear damage. The recommendation to mitigate risk was for cable inspections to be completed, and to install a protective hose on the cable. There was no record of implementation of this SAIB in the logbooks.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N330MT

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA097
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 30, 2016 in Henderson, NV
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGPRODUKTIONS-UND EA 300/L, registration: N330MT
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 30, 2016, about 1630 Pacific daylight time, an Extra Flugzeugproduktions UND, EA-300/L, N330MT, sustained substantial damage when it impacted mountainous terrain about 12 miles south of Henderson Executive Airport (HND), Las Vegas, Nevada. The airplane was registered to and operated by Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The airline transport pilot and passenger were fatally injured. Visual (VMC) meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The local business flight departed HND about 1600.

Information provided by the company representatives revealed that the accident airplane departed and rendezvoused with two other company airplanes to conduct a simulated air to air combat mission. Two airplanes at a time would maneuver against each other, while the other airplane observed from a safe distance. Following completion of their air combat profile, all three airplanes returned towards HND. The first two airplanes landed and realized that the third airplane behind them did not return. Subsequently, the company launched an airplane to conduct a search, and shortly thereafter, the wreckage was discovered near a hilltop.

Examination of the accident site by the National Transportation Safety Board, investigator-in-charge, revealed that the airplane impacted mountainous terrain on a 030 degree heading. All the major components of the airplane were located throughout the 800 foot long debris path.

The airplane was recovered to a secure facility for further examination.

Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N763DT

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA024
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 26, 2014 in Las Vegas, NV
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGPRODUKTIONS-UND EA 300/L, registration: N763DT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.
NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 26, 2014, about 1130 Pacific daylight time, an Extra Flugzeugproduktions, N763DT, experienced an in-flight rudder cable separation after recovering from an aerodynamic maneuver, and veered off the runway during the emergency landing at Mc Carran International Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada. Sky Combat Ace was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The flight instructor and pilot-rated passenger were not injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The aerobatic demonstration flight departed from the Henderson Executive Airport, Las Vegas about 1100. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed.

The flight instructor stated that the purpose of the flight was to take the passenger on an aerobatic introduction flight where he would demonstrate the characteristics of the airplane. He performed a spin maneuver, and during the recovery, he felt the tension in the rudder pedal become completely slack. The pedal moved completely forward, and he realized that the rudder cable must have separated. The flight instructor declared an emergency, and decided to land at Mc Carran International Airport due to their robust emergency facilities and less of a crosswind. The flight instructor further stated that during landing on runway 19R, he could not maintain directional control, and the airplane slid off the right side.

A post accident examination of the airplane was performed by an inspector from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). He found the area that the rudder cable had separated, and it was sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Materials Laboratory for further evaluation. The examination revealed that the rudder cable showed signatures indicative of a failure as a result of tension overstress. Several of the wire strands on the cable were damaged by rubbing wear. Several of the damaged strands were either completely worn through or nearly worn through, compromising the cross-section of the cable. There was no obvious indication of material transfer.

A Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB), CE-12-01 was issued in October 2011 to address some Extra Aircraft rudder cable failures. The SAIB stated that because the cables are made of stainless steel they are susceptible to corrosion and wear damage. The recommendation to mitigate risk was for cable inspections to be completed, and to install a protective hose on the cable. There was no record of implementation of this SAIB in the logbooks. 

http://registry.faa.gov/N369XT 

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA034 
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi &  Commuter 
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 05, 2014 in Las Vegas,  NV
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGPRODUKTIONS-UND EA 300, registration: N369XT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 5, 2014, at 1145 Pacific standard time, an Extra Flugzeugproducktions-UND, EA-300/L, N369XT, experienced a partial loss of engine power while on final approach to runway 35L, Henderson Executive Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada, and collided with terrain short of the runway. The airplane's right wing was substantially damaged; the commercial pilot and single passenger were uninjured. The airplane was registered to Unmanned Systems, Inc., and operated by Sky Combat Ace under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which originated from Henderson Executive Airport at 1100.

The pilot stated that while on long final to runway 35L, about 3,000 feet above ground level (agl), he felt a loss of engine power. The propeller continued to windmill while he attempted to restart the engine twice unsuccessfully. He then executed a forced landing to flat desert terrain short of runway 35L. The right wing and landing gear sustained structural damage during the off field landing. The pilot stated that the center fuel tank was 3/4 full (17 gal capacity), and the wing tanks were empty.


FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Las Vegas FSDO-19


The Sky Combat Ace stunt plane that crashed April 30 near Jean impacted a hilltop 12 miles south of Henderson Executive Airport, killing the pilot and his passenger and spreading debris for 800 feet, federal investigators said in a preliminary report Wednesday. 

The single-engine aircraft, an Extra EA-300/L registered to Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC, impacted mountainous terrain while heading northeast, according to the National Transportation Safety Board, investigator-in-charge.


The preliminary report did not mention a probable cause for the crash but said visual flight conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed. A factual report followed by an analysis and probable cause is expected to take eight months to a year to complete.


Pilot Ben Soyars, 37, of Las Vegas and Steve Peterson, 32, of Rohnert Park, California, died in the crash of blunt trauma injuries, the Clark County coroner’s office has said.


Peterson was among 12 men who had traveled to Las Vegas for a bachelor party and had planned to take simulated, air-to-air combat flights on Sky Combat Ace planes with an “instructor” pilot in the back seat of each of the three aircraft and their “student” passengers in the front seat of each cockpit.


But with thunderstorms lurking near Henderson Executive Airport about 4 p.m. on April 30, members of the bachelor party had questioned the Sky Combat Ace refund policy. It says essentially that customers must go on the flights with the company’s instructor pilots or forfeit their fare money. So rather than lose more than $8,000 that the group had ponied up for the flights, three of nine who had planned to go departed in three of the company’s planes about 4:30 p.m.


“Information provided by the company representatives revealed that the accident plane departed and rendezvoused with two other company airplanes to conduct a simulated air to air combat mission,” the NTSB report says. “Two airplanes at a time would maneuver against each other while the other airplane observed from a safe distance.”


After the simulated air-combat maneuvers, all three aircraft returned toward the Henderson airport. But after the first two airplanes landed “and realized that the third airplane behind them did not return … the company launched an airplane to conduct a search,” the report reads.


The wreckage was discovered a short time later near a hilltop.


All major components of the airplane were located in the debris path, according to the preliminary investigation report.


Sky Combat Ace President Richard Coe has not returned phone calls to the Las Vegas Review-Journal seeking comment.


Original article can be found here: http://www.reviewjournal.com




Two men who died in a stunt plane near Las Vegas were performing "air combat" maneuvers with two other planes before crashing near a hilltop, according to a preliminary report.

The crash happened April 30 during a paid excursion offered by a Las Vegas tourism company with a history of noted safety issues. Sky Combat Ace allows paying customers — even those without any previous flight experience — to fly and control its acrobatic planes. The Federal Aviation Administration allows anyone to fly a plane as long as there is a licensed pilot alongside to provide instruction.

A preliminary report issued by the National Transportation Safety Board indicates the fixed-wing single-engine plane crashed about a half hour after take-off from Henderson Executive Airport.

It hit mountainous terrain about 12 miles south of the airport and left an 800-foot-long path of debris near a hilltop west of the dry lake beds near the town of Jean, about 30 miles south of Las Vegas. All of the major parts of the plane were recovered and will be further examined for the final accident report expected months from now.

Pilot Benjamin Anderson Soyars, 37, of Las Vegas, and Steve Anthony Peterson, a 32-year-old customer from Rohnert Park, California, were found dead. Their deaths were ruled accidental by the coroner's office.

The NTSB investigators said they were told by representatives of the parent company, Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC, that the fatal flight went up for a "simulated air to air combat mission" with two other airplanes. The exercise allowed two planes to "maneuver against each other" while a third watched from a distance.

Company spokeswoman Megan Fazio initially claimed no other planes were involved but on Wednesday confirmed the other planes noted in the crash report. She also said video footage of the exercise taken from the air is not being released.

Fazio had also initially claimed an "incident free" safety record but has since refused to answer questions about at least five documented safety concerns formally noted in FAA and NTSB records from the past five years the business has been in operation. None of those cases resulted in injury, though one incident in March 2015 involved the same Sky Combat Ace airplane that crashed April 30.

Fazio had said the passenger paid for and had performed the "Sky Combat" experience. The website indicates the tour package allows the student to fly the plane while the instructor teaches "the art of aerial dogfighting."

The NTSB report said the company that afternoon realized the plane was missing and launched another airplane to search for it after the two others landed back at the airport. The crash report noted that visibility was found to be sufficient at the time. There was no flight plan filed.

The company, which also operates in San Diego, offers aerobatic, air combat and sightseeing flight experiences with package prices ranging from $150 to $2,000, according to its website. Its signature offering allows customers to fly stunt planes with instructors' supervision.





Steven Anthony "Scuba" PETERSON
 (1983 - 2016)



Steven Anthony "Scuba" Peterson, of Rohnert Park passed away on April 30, 2016 at the age of 32. Steve was born on October 5, 1983 in Santa Rosa, CA to Robert and Jackie Peterson, and was a lifelong resident of Sonoma County. Steve grew up in Rohnert Park and graduated from Rancho Cotati High School in 2002. It was in high school that Steve developed a passion for working with his hands and tools on engines. He made a career for himself at Peterson CAT where he went through extensive schooling and training to become a certified Electric Power Generation Technician, in which he worked on large diesel engines and generators; often times keeping hospitals powered during emergencies, and being called upon 24 hours a days seven days a week in response to urgent situations requiring his expertise. Steve's strong work ethic and his positive attitude during challenging times were admired by all those around him. Steve was a genuine friend, loving brother and son, and devoted husband who always made family and friends his top priority. Many looked to Steve and depended on him for support and guidance in all aspects of life. He was extremely passionate about the outdoors, and enjoyed hunting, fishing, and diving in his spare time. He made a point of living every moment to its fullest. Steve is survived by his wife, Jennifer Leah, their unborn daughter Avery Rose, his parents Robert and Jackie, his older brother Mike, his twin brother Chris, and twin sisters Christine and Jennifer. Steve's spirit brought so much love, joy, and laughter to all those he encountered. He will forever be remembered and greatly missed by all that knew him. A memorial service will be held at Pleasant Hill Memorial Park, 1700 Pleasant Hill Rd., Sebastopol, CA 95472 at 11:00 a.m., Saturday May 7, 2016. 

The family requests that any donations in Steven's memory be made at: http://gofundme.com/stevenpeterson 



Benjamin Anderson Soyars, III
October 10, 1978 - April 30, 2016 
Resided in Las Vegas, NV 

Obituary
Benjamin Anderson Soyars, III, "Ben", age 37, died on Saturday, April 30th, 2016 while living in Nevada. He was the son of Benjamin A. Soyars, Jr. and Ellen H. Soyars; brother of Lindsay Soyars Ward & her husband, Casey; and uncle of Catherine Finley Ward. He also leaves behind his long-time love, Charity Elam and her daughter Wynnter of Richmond.

Ben grew up in Warrenton and attended Highland School before leaving for prep school and college. He then moved to Arizona to attend flight school. Ever since boyhood, Ben had a passion for flying. He was a highly accomplished pilot and instructor logging over 9, 000 hours in various types of planes, from small aerobatic aircraft to corporate jets. He will be remembered by many for his bright smile, his quick wit, and his engaging personality.

A memorial gathering will be held at the Airlie Conference Center Smokehouse, 6809 Airlie Rd., Warrenton, VA 20187 on Saturday, May 21st, 2016 from 1 to 4 pm, where family and friends are invited to share stories, pictures and memories of times spent together with Ben.


A Sky Combat Ace stunt plane sits on truck bed after its pilot made an emergency landing Oct. 26, 2014 at McCarran International Airport with a passenger on board. National Transportation Safety Board investigators determined that the pilot experienced a control issue with the aircraft during spin maneuver when a rudder cable failed.


Sky Combat Ace instructor pilot Ben Soyars, 37, of Las Vegas, is shown with an unidentified person in an August 2015 post from his Facebook page. Soyars and Steve Peterson, 32, of Rohnert Park, Calif., (not shown) were killed Saturday when their plane crashed near Jean. (Ben Soyar/Facebook)


Sky Combat Ace instructor pilot Ben Soyars, 37, of Las Vegas, right, is shown with an unidentified person in an August 2015 post from his Facebook page. Soyars and Steve Peterson, 32, of Rohnert Park, Calif., (not shown) were killed Saturday when their plane crashed near Jean. (Ben Soyar/Facebook)


Officials from the Clark County Department of Aviation, Clark County Fire Department, Henderson Fire Department, and Henderson Police Department respond to an airplane crash at the southern edge of the Henderson Executive Airport in Henderson on Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014. 



The same stunt plane that crashed Saturday, killing a Sky Combat Ace pilot and his passenger, had been involved in a dangerous, low-flying maneuver in 2015 over the Colorado River south of Hoover Dam, according to Federal Aviation Administration officials.


A pending enforcement action letter, obtained by the Las Vegas Review-Journal through a Freedom of Information Act request, proposes to suspend the commercial pilot and flight instructor certificates of Denis Richard Boissonneault of Las Vegas for 135 days for violating FAA regulations during a March 16, 2015, flight from Henderson Executive Airport.


“On takeoff … you abruptly pitched up the aircraft in a manner not normal for takeoff of an Extra,” the letter reads, referring to the Extra EA300 aircraft with tail No. N330MT.


The letter also states Boissonneault executed “an aileron roll,” commonly known as a barrel roll, “below 1,500 feet above the surface over the Colorado River.”


An FAA official familiar with the incident said Thursday the FAA was alerted to the low, aerobatic flight by Bureau of Reclamation police at Hoover Dam who saw the plane flying south of the dam.


The FAA official said Boissonneault had a passenger in the plane and that such maneuvers below 1,500 feet above the surface are prohibited by FAA regulations.


“Your operation of N330MT, in the manner and circumstances … was careless or reckless so as to endanger the life or property of another,” reads the Sept. 9, 2015, letter to Boissonneault.


Attempts to reach Boissonneault on Thursday were unsuccessful.


Messages seeking comment from Sky Combat Ace President Richard “Tex” Coe left on the company’s answering machine also were not returned.


A profile of Denis “Smokey” Boissonneault on Sky Combat Ace’s website says, “His favorite thing to do is to share his passion with anyone who wants to learn about the joy of flight, particularly advanced aerobatics!”


FAA officials confirmed that the two-seat, single-engine aircraft Boissonneault flew south of Hoover Dam on March 16, 2015, is the same one that crashed Saturday near Jean killing a passenger, Steve Peterson, 32, of Rohnert Park, California, and Sky Combat Ace instructor pilot Ben Soyars, 37, of Las Vegas.


BACHELOR PARTY DEATHS


Peterson and his twin brother, Chris Peterson, were among 12 friends who had traveled to Las Vegas for a bachelor party. Nine from the group were supposed to fly in at least three Sky Combat Ace stunt planes as part of a simulated air-combat and bombing run experience they had planned months in advance through Vegas Extreme Adventures.


With thunderstorms in the area, some members of the group declined to go on the flights. But Steve Peterson and two others decided to go to avoid forfeiting the more than $8,000 in fares in keeping with the company’s non-refund policy, one member of the group has said.


The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating Saturday’s fatal stunt plane accident near Jean. The FAA is also investigating Sky Combat Ace on legal grounds to see if the company was in compliance with its regulations at the time of Saturday’s accident.


Vegas Extreme Adventures, which does business as Sky Combat Ace, had issued a statement after Saturday’s plane crash saying the company has provided “instructional aerobatic airplane rides to the general public since 2011 and has conducted over 15,000 incident-free flights over the last 5 years.”


When asked about its “incident-free” claim Tuesday, Vegas Extreme Adventures publicist Megan Fazio released a revised statement that reads, “Up until this tragic accident on April 30th, 2016, there have been exactly zero injuries to customers at Sky Combat Ace. That is 5 years and 15,000 flights.”


Records obtained by the Review-Journal, however, show there have been two close-call incidents in which pilots and passengers narrowly escaped injuries. And, there have been numerous complaints about Sky Combat Ace’s flights over Henderson neighborhoods and elsewhere in Southern Nevada filed with local authorities and the FAA.


RECORD OF PROBLEMS


On Oct. 26, 2014, a Sky Combat Ace stunt plane made an emergency landing at McCarran International Airport with a passenger on board after performing an aerobatic spin maneuver. National Transportation Safety Board investigators determined that the pilot’s control problem stemmed from a rudder cable that had failed.


The next month, a Sky Combat Ace aircraft was forced to land on a street near the Henderson airport after the pilot experienced a partial loss of engine power. The accident caused substantial damage to the plane’s right wing.


FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said Sky Combat Ace had been granted a waiver in 2011 to carry passengers for hire while flying in formation but the waiver was suspended for a month in 2012 after the agency investigated a complaint that the company’s aircraft flew in formation at 500 feet above ground level contrary to provisions of the waiver.


The waiver was revoked Aug. 30, 2012, “based on a second complaint involving low-flying aircraft near the Hoover Dam,” Gregor said.


Las Vegas trial lawyer Robert W. Cottle said Thursday he is representing a mechanic in a claim against Sky Combat Ace. He said his client was run over in January by a Sky Combat Ace plane that was taxiing at the south end of the Henderson Airport.


“Fortunately he’s alive,” Cottle said about the mechanic who works for an air service company at the airport.


“He turned around to catch the red plane in the corner of his eye. That’s when the plane ran over the top of him and his foot was struck by the wheel,” he said, adding that the mechanic remained flat on the tarmac to avoid being struck by the propeller.


Original article can be found here:  http://www.reviewjournal.com 



 LAS VEGAS - The two men killed when a stunt plane crashed near Las Vegas were performing “air combat” maneuvers as part of a paid flight experience provided by a tourism company catering to extreme adventure-seekers.

Benjamin Anderson Soyars of Las Vegas, and Steve Anthony Peterson of Rohnert Park, California, died Saturday of blunt force injuries, according to the Clark County Coroner’s office. Their deaths have been ruled an accident.

The company, Sky Combat Ace, on its website describes Soyars, 37, as a veteran pilot with a background in competition and airshow flying. The company allows customers to fly stunt planes with instructors’ supervision.

The company didn’t identify the two men by name but said it was a student passenger and an instructor pilot.

It’s unclear who was flying the plane at the time of the crash.

“I cannot say who was in control at the time of the accident, as that would be speculation,” company spokesman Megan Fazio said Monday. “We won’t have the results until the FAA releases them following the completion of the investigation.”

The company said it has been providing instructional aerobatic airplane rides since 2011 and has had 15,000 incident-free flights in the past five years.

Fazio said the passenger paid for and had performed the “Sky Combat” experience and that the accident happened as they were returning to the hangar. The website indicates the tour package allows the student to fly the plane while the instructor teaches “the art of aerial dogfighting.” No other planes were involved.

The parent company, Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC, said in a statement that the fixed-wing single-engine plane took off from Henderson Executive Airport at 4 p.m. Saturday but didn’t return from its outing on time. They learned of the crash about 4:45 p.m., after calling air traffic control to report the missing Extra 300 airplane. No distress calls were made before the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration said it’s investigating. Records show the aircraft’s airworthiness was classified standard and categorized for normal and acrobatic flights. It was built in 2011 and had up to date certification.

The National Transportation Safety Board was also called to investigate but couldn’t immediately provide details.

http://www.rgj.com





CLARK COUNTY (KTNV) - A man from California was one of two people killed in a plane crash in rural Clark County Saturday evening.

The incident happened several miles east of I-15 near Jean, near State Route 604 and Southern Nevada Liteweight Road.


The plane is a Extra EA-330LC. Records indicate the plane belonged to a Henderson company called Vegas Extreme Adventures, also known as Sky Combat Ace. The business offers customers acrobatic stunt rides.


One of the plane's occupants was identified as 32-year-old Steve Peterson of Rohnert Park, Calif. 13 Action News learned Peterson leaves behind a pregnant wife who's expecting a baby in June.


A student pilot at the facility said this was a shocking tragedy.


"My heart just sank," said Dan Koury. "Right away it was just like oh my God, it's a tragedy for anyone to die in a plane crash but somehow it hits closer to home when you know the people who are out there. It's just a really sick feeling to my stomach."


According to a statement from Vegas Extreme Adventures, the plane took off from Henderson Executive Airport around 4 p.m. When the aircraft failed to return on time, employees notified air traffic control of the missing airplane and immediately launched an aircraft for search and rescue operations.


At approximately 4:45 p.m., the crash site was located and called in to the Henderson Executive Airport Control Tower, who in turn notified emergency personnel of the location of the crash near the Jean dry lakebed.


There was 1 student passenger and 1 instructor pilot onboard the plane. When emergency responders arrived, both occupants were pronounced dead at the scene. To Vegas Extreme Adventures' knowledge, there were no distress calls made prior to the accident.


"On behalf of all Vegas Extreme Adventures employees and staff, we would like to express our deepest condolences to the families who have lost loved ones and have been affected by this unfortunate accident," according to the statement. "Vegas Extreme Adventures is working closely and cooperating with the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board to determine the cause of the accident."


According to the statement, Vegas Extreme Adventures has been providing instructional aerobatic airplane rides to the general public since 2011 and has conducted more than 15,000 incident-free flights over the last 5 years.


Story and video:  http://www.ktnv.com




LAS VEGAS (FOX5) -  A plane involved in a deadly crash Saturday  evening originated from Henderson Executive Airport. 

The company, Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC, released a statement Sunday following the crash. 

According to the statement, an Extra EA-330LC plane registered to Vegas Extreme Adventures left from Henderson Executive Airport at about 4 p.m. Saturday. When the aircraft did not return on time, employees notified air traffic control of the missing plane, and immediately launched an aircraft for search and rescue operations. 

The crash site was located about 4:45 p.m., and Henderson Executive Airport was notified of the crash site near the Jean dry lake bed, the statement said. 

An instructor pilot, and student passenger were aboard the plane, and pronounced dead at the scene by emergency personnel, the statement said. The company did not release the identities of the deceased. 

The company said it was not aware of any distress calls prior to the crash. 

The statement said the company is working with the Federal Aviation Administration, and the National Transportation Safety Board to determine the cause of the crash. 

Vegas Extreme Adventures said it has been providing instructional aerobatic airplane rides to the general public since 2011. The company said it has conducted more than 15,000 incident-free flights during the past five years. 

Story and video: http://www.fox5vegas.com


A single-engine aircraft that crashed Saturday amid dark skies and rain, killing an instructor pilot and a passenger, belonged to a tourism fighter plane company that allows customers to operate planes with instructors’ assistance.

Authorities were alerted about 5 p.m. Saturday that an Extra EA-330LC aircraft belonging to Sky Combat Ace had crashed minutes earlier about 4 miles east of Las Vegas Boulevard and a half-mile south of 8 Mile Mine Road, Henderson Executive Airport spokeswoman Linda Healey said Sunday. Earlier reports had suggested the crash occurred farther south.


The plane had taken off about 4 p.m., said Megan Fazio of Sky Combat Ace's parent company, Vegas Extreme Adventures. The company sent out a search plane, then learned just after 4:45 p.m. that the missing plane had crashed near a Jean dry lake bed, Fazio said. Both people killed in the crash were men, she said; the Clark County Coroner’s office will identify them.


No distress calls were received from the plane, Fazio said.


About the same time the plane took off, thunderstorms moving southwest from Boulder City were blanketing the area of the crash, National Weather Service meteorologist Caleb Steele said Sunday. The plane “almost certainly” would have been flying in stormy weather if it was anywhere near the area of the crash, he said.


Sky Combat Ace, which operates out of Henderson as well as Gillespie Field near San Diego, bills itself as offering a “whole new level of adrenaline” on its website and touts a “perfect safety record,” with no injuries reported since its opening in 2011. It also states that it operates “7 days a week, 365 days a year."


The company compares the passenger experience to that of “a steely-eyed fighter pilot at the controls of your very own fighter jet, pulling Gs and squeezing the trigger.” It says its planes are equipped with dual flight controls, allowing an instructor pilot to take over in the “unlikely event that it becomes necessary."


Metro Police and the Clark County Fire Department did not respond to questions about whether a passenger or a pilot was in control at the time of the crash. A sign at Sky Combat Ace's Henderson office said the business will be closed until May 9.


The National Transportation Safety Board is taking over the investigation, Healey said.


Original article can be found here:  http://lasvegassun.com





LAS VEGAS (KSNV News3LV) — Two people were killed Saturday afternoon when an acrobatic aircraft crashed near the California state line.

The plane was identified as an Extra EA-330LC.

The tail number, N330MT, is registered to Vegas Extreme Adventures, LLC and the registration says it was usually flown out of Henderson Executive Airport.

Vegas Extreme Adventures released a statement, with the following:

On behalf of all Vegas Extreme Adventures employees and staff, we would like to express our deepest condolences to the families who have lost loved ones and have been affected by this unfortunate accident. Vegas Extreme Adventures is working closely and cooperating with the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board to determine the cause of the accident.  Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC has been providing instructional aerobatic airplane rides to the general public since 2011 and has conducted over 15,000 incident-free flights over the last 5 years.

Metro said it received a call that a small single-engine plane went down in the area west of the dry lake beds near Jean, about 5 p.m.

Because of the weather and remote location, Metro Search and Rescue were responding for assistance and recovery, along with the Clark County Fire Department.

CCFD Chief John Steinbeck says Engine 65 was first on the scene, but that it was difficult to find, about four miles east of Las Vegas Blvd near 8 Mile Rd.

Chief Steinbeck says arriving responders found two people deceased at the scene, with one still in their seat and the other thrown 40 feet from the plane.

McCarran Airport said the plane went down about nine miles south of Henderson Executive Airport and was reported to authorities by the pilot of another aircraft.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.

The Clark County coroner's office will release the names of the two killed after relatives have been notified.

Story and video:  http://news3lv.com




Two people were killed Saturday when a single-engine plane crashed Saturday evening near the state line and Nipton Road, Las Vegas police said.

Police and emergency crews responded to the area after receiving a call about a small single-engine plane that crashed about 5 p.m., Metro said.

An initial report said the crash had occurred west of the dry lake beds near Jean, but Metro later said the location was “best described as State Line and Nipton Road.”

Arriving emergency crews located two deceased occupants, police said just after 6 p.m.

McCarran International Airport spokeswoman Linda Healy said the plane was a single-engine EXTRA EA300. The Clark County Fire Department responded to the scene, she said.

According to its website, EXTRA is a manufacturer of aerobatic airplanes and variants of the EA300 are flown by demonstration teams for companies like Red Bull and Breitling.

Details were not immediately available about where the plane was coming from or where it was headed, or if the weather played a role in the crash.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash, police said.

Original article can be found here: http://www.reviewjournal.com  

A plane operated by a company that lets customers engage in mock dogfights made an emergency landing on a Henderson street today after possibly experiencing a mechanical problem, officials said.

The Extra 330 LC plane was carrying two people when it landed on Volunteer Boulevard, stopping at the southern perimeter fence of Henderson Executive Airport, said Christine Crews, a spokeswoman for the Clark County Department of Aviation.

Nobody was hurt, but the aircraft sustained major damage, Crews said.

The plane, operated by Sky Combat Ace, took off from the airport at 11:15 a.m., according to a statement from the company. At about 11:40 a.m., air traffic controllers reported the pilot had declared an emergency and had to land.

City of Henderson spokeswoman Kathleen Richards said the aircraft may have had a mechanical issue but the cause of the problem would be determined by the National Transportation Safety Board.

On idle power, the plane was able to glide and descend for about two miles before landing about a quarter mile short of the airport runway, the company said. Henderson police and firefighters responded.

There was one Sky Combat Ace employee and one passenger on board, the company statement said.

Sky Combat Ace allows customers to engage in aerial dogfights and maneuver the aircraft once they reach 6,000 feet, company spokeswoman Megan Fazio said. Customers are not involved in takeoffs or landings, she said.

Sky Combat Ace is working with the Federal Aviation Administration and the NTSB to determine the cause of the incident, the company said.

In more than three years of operations and with in excess of 14,000 customer flights, Sky Combat Ace has not had an aircraft accident, the company said. Its pilots are trained for emergency landings, the statement said.

Story, comments and photo gallery: http://www.lasvegassun.com









HENDERSON, NV (FOX5) -  A small plane landed on a road near the Henderson Executive Airport on Wednesday morning.

Christine Crews, of McCarran International Airport, said the Extra 330 private aircraft landed near the intersection of Volunteer Boulevard and Executive Airport Road around 11:50 a.m., about a quarter-mile short of the runway.

Crews said the plane ended up crashing into the fence that surrounds the airport. She said the pilot did not contact the tower before the crash, but did after the landing to let authorities know about the situation.

No injuries were reported, Crews said.

A crane has been called in to remove the aircraft from the road, Crews said.

Crews said the National Transportation Safety Board will conduct an investigation.

Story and Comments: http://www.fox5vegas.com




Henderson, NV (KTNV) -- A small plane landed just short of the airport on Wednesday. 

Around 11:46 a.m. an EXTRA 330 aircraft with 2 people on board made a hard landing in Henderson.

The plane came down on Volunteer Boulevard and went into the fence surrounding Henderson Executive Airport, about one-fourth of a mile short of the runway.

There were no injuries or fire, but the plane did have major damage.

The pilot did not call into the control tower prior to the landing, so there are no details yet as to why the plane went down.

The plane, operated by Sky Combat Ace, has released the following statement:

Sky Combat Ace is working closely with the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board and the investigation to determine the cause of the incident and will release the final cause upon completion of the investigation.

The FAA, The National Transportation Safety Board, Fire, police, EMS and medical examiners were on call per airport protocol and responded immediately after Air Traffic Control gained knowledge of where the plane was going to land. The area is sealed off and restricted only to those personnel. Sky Combat Ace personnel are also at the site and are doing everything they can to be helpful to the investigation.

Volunteer Boulevard is currently closed.

- Source:  http://www.jrn.com 


 HENDERSON (KSNV MyNews3.com) – A small plane affiliated with Sky Combat Ace made an emergency landing Wednesday morning near Henderson Executive Airport. 

 The Extra 330 with two people aboard was forced to land just after 11:45 a.m. about a quarter-mile south of Henderson Runway 3/5L on Volunteer Boulevard near Via Inspirada, said Christine Crews, spokesperson for the Clark County Aviation Department, which operates the airport. The pilot then steered the aircraft into the perimeter fence.

Both people aboard were unharmed and left the aircraft on their own power. The plane sustained major damage, Crews said. According to the FAA, the plane is registered to “Unmanned Systems Inc.” based in Henderson.

"Sky Combat Ace is working closely with the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board and the investigation to determine the cause of the incident and will release the final cause upon completion of the investigation," according to a statement released for the company by Neon Public Relations.

"The FAA, The National Transportation Safety Board, Fire, police, EMS and medical examiners were on call per airport protocol and responded immediately after Air Traffic Control gained knowledge of where the plane was going to land. The area is sealed off and restricted only to those personnel. Sky Combat Ace personnel are also at the site and are doing everything they can to be helpful to the investigation."

The pilot did not contact the tower until after the plane landed, Crews said. Names of the pilot and passenger were not released.

The Henderson Police and Fire departments responded to the accident.


- Source:  http://www.mynews3.com 

HENDERSON, Nev. — A small plane crashed into a fence Wednesday morning on the outskirts of the Henderson Executive Airport. 

Two people were onboard but were not hurt in the crash, officials said.

The two-seater struck a fence off Volunteer Boulevard just before noon. No cars were involved.

The plane is owned by Sky Combat Ace, which operates out of the airport. In a news release, the company said it was working with the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board in the crash investigation.

The pilot worked for Sky Combat Ace, a release said.

Other details surrounding the crash, including the cause, have not been released.

Story and Comments:  http://www.8newsnow.com















No comments: