Friday, May 6, 2016

Extra EA-330LC, Vegas Extreme Adventures, N330MT, fatal accident occurred April 30, 2016 in Henderson, Clark County, Nevada; Extra EA-330LC, Sky Combat Ace, N369XT, accident occurred November 05, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada; Extra EA 300/L, Vegas Extreme Adventures, N763DT, Accident occurred October 26, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA024 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 26, 2014 in Las Vegas, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/16/2016
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGPRODUKTIONS-UND EA 300/L, registration: N763DT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor was conducting an aerobatic demonstration flight for a pilot-rated passenger, during which the flight instructor was demonstrating the airplane’s characteristics to the pilot. The flight instructor reported that he performed a spin maneuver, and during the recovery, he felt the tension in the rudder pedal become completely slack. The pedal moved completely forward, and he realized that the rudder cable must have separated. During the subsequent emergency landing at a nearby airport, the flight instructor could not maintain directional control, and the airplane slid off the right side of the runway.

A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the rudder cable had separated. The rudder cable showed signatures indicative of a failure due to tension overstress. Several of the wire strands on the cable were damaged by rubbing wear and were either completely worn through or nearly worn through, compromising the cross-section of the cable. The Federal Aviation Administration had issued a special airworthiness information bulletin (SAIB) for this airplane about 3 years before the accident to address similar rudder cable failures. The SAIB recommended that, to mitigate risk, cable inspections should be completed and a protective hose should be installed. A review of the maintenance logbooks found no record indicating that the SAIB had been implemented, and no protective hose was found. The SAIB was not mandatory, and the operator, which operated flights for paying passengers, including aerobatics and air combat demonstrations, chose not to the comply with it. If the operator had chosen to comply with the SAIB, the rudder cable may not have failed.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The failure of the rudder cable due to tension overstress as a result of the cable’s strength being compromised by wear damage, which resulted in the flight instructor’s inability to maintain directional control during the landing roll. 

On October 26, 2014, about 1130 Pacific daylight time, an Extra Flugzeugproduktions, N763DT, experienced an in-flight rudder cable separation after recovering from an aerodynamic maneuver, and veered off the runway during the emergency landing at Mc Carran International Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada. Sky Combat Ace was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The flight instructor and pilot-rated passenger were not injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The aerobatic demonstration flight departed from the Henderson Executive Airport, Las Vegas about 1100. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed.

The flight instructor stated that the purpose of the flight was to take the passenger on an aerobatic introduction flight where he would demonstrate the characteristics of the airplane. He performed a spin maneuver, and during the recovery, he felt the tension in the rudder pedal become completely slack. The pedal moved completely forward, and he realized that the rudder cable must have separated. The flight instructor declared an emergency, and decided to land at Mc Carran International Airport due to their robust emergency facilities and less of a crosswind. The flight instructor further stated that during landing on runway 19R, he could not maintain directional control, and the airplane slid off the right side.

A post accident examination of the airplane was performed by an inspector from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). He found the area that the rudder cable had separated, and it was sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Materials Laboratory for further evaluation. The examination revealed that the rudder cable showed signatures indicative of a failure as a result of tension overstress. Several of the wire strands on the cable were damaged by rubbing wear. Several of the damaged strands were either completely worn through or nearly worn through, compromising the cross-section of the cable. There was no obvious indication of material transfer.

A Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB), CE-12-01 was issued in October 2011 to address some Extra Aircraft rudder cable failures. The SAIB stated that because the cables are made of stainless steel they are susceptible to corrosion and wear damage. The recommendation to mitigate risk was for cable inspections to be completed, and to install a protective hose on the cable. There was no record of implementation of this SAIB in the logbooks.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N330MT

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA097
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, April 30, 2016 in Henderson, NV
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGPRODUKTIONS-UND EA 300/L, registration: N330MT
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 30, 2016, about 1630 Pacific daylight time, an Extra Flugzeugproduktions UND, EA-300/L, N330MT, sustained substantial damage when it impacted mountainous terrain about 12 miles south of Henderson Executive Airport (HND), Las Vegas, Nevada. The airplane was registered to and operated by Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The airline transport pilot and passenger were fatally injured. Visual (VMC) meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The local business flight departed HND about 1600.

Information provided by the company representatives revealed that the accident airplane departed and rendezvoused with two other company airplanes to conduct a simulated air to air combat mission. Two airplanes at a time would maneuver against each other, while the other airplane observed from a safe distance. Following completion of their air combat profile, all three airplanes returned towards HND. The first two airplanes landed and realized that the third airplane behind them did not return. Subsequently, the company launched an airplane to conduct a search, and shortly thereafter, the wreckage was discovered near a hilltop.

Examination of the accident site by the National Transportation Safety Board, investigator-in-charge, revealed that the airplane impacted mountainous terrain on a 030 degree heading. All the major components of the airplane were located throughout the 800 foot long debris path.

The airplane was recovered to a secure facility for further examination.

Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N763DT

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA024
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 26, 2014 in Las Vegas, NV
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGPRODUKTIONS-UND EA 300/L, registration: N763DT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.
NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 26, 2014, about 1130 Pacific daylight time, an Extra Flugzeugproduktions, N763DT, experienced an in-flight rudder cable separation after recovering from an aerodynamic maneuver, and veered off the runway during the emergency landing at Mc Carran International Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada. Sky Combat Ace was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The flight instructor and pilot-rated passenger were not injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The aerobatic demonstration flight departed from the Henderson Executive Airport, Las Vegas about 1100. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed.

The flight instructor stated that the purpose of the flight was to take the passenger on an aerobatic introduction flight where he would demonstrate the characteristics of the airplane. He performed a spin maneuver, and during the recovery, he felt the tension in the rudder pedal become completely slack. The pedal moved completely forward, and he realized that the rudder cable must have separated. The flight instructor declared an emergency, and decided to land at Mc Carran International Airport due to their robust emergency facilities and less of a crosswind. The flight instructor further stated that during landing on runway 19R, he could not maintain directional control, and the airplane slid off the right side.

A post accident examination of the airplane was performed by an inspector from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). He found the area that the rudder cable had separated, and it was sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Materials Laboratory for further evaluation. The examination revealed that the rudder cable showed signatures indicative of a failure as a result of tension overstress. Several of the wire strands on the cable were damaged by rubbing wear. Several of the damaged strands were either completely worn through or nearly worn through, compromising the cross-section of the cable. There was no obvious indication of material transfer.

A Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB), CE-12-01 was issued in October 2011 to address some Extra Aircraft rudder cable failures. The SAIB stated that because the cables are made of stainless steel they are susceptible to corrosion and wear damage. The recommendation to mitigate risk was for cable inspections to be completed, and to install a protective hose on the cable. There was no record of implementation of this SAIB in the logbooks. 

http://registry.faa.gov/N369XT 

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA034 
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi &  Commuter 
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 05, 2014 in Las Vegas,  NV
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGPRODUKTIONS-UND EA 300, registration: N369XT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 5, 2014, at 1145 Pacific standard time, an Extra Flugzeugproducktions-UND, EA-300/L, N369XT, experienced a partial loss of engine power while on final approach to runway 35L, Henderson Executive Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada, and collided with terrain short of the runway. The airplane's right wing was substantially damaged; the commercial pilot and single passenger were uninjured. The airplane was registered to Unmanned Systems, Inc., and operated by Sky Combat Ace under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which originated from Henderson Executive Airport at 1100.

The pilot stated that while on long final to runway 35L, about 3,000 feet above ground level (agl), he felt a loss of engine power. The propeller continued to windmill while he attempted to restart the engine twice unsuccessfully. He then executed a forced landing to flat desert terrain short of runway 35L. The right wing and landing gear sustained structural damage during the off field landing. The pilot stated that the center fuel tank was 3/4 full (17 gal capacity), and the wing tanks were empty.


FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Las Vegas FSDO-19


The Sky Combat Ace stunt plane that crashed April 30 near Jean impacted a hilltop 12 miles south of Henderson Executive Airport, killing the pilot and his passenger and spreading debris for 800 feet, federal investigators said in a preliminary report Wednesday. 

The single-engine aircraft, an Extra EA-300/L registered to Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC, impacted mountainous terrain while heading northeast, according to the National Transportation Safety Board, investigator-in-charge.


The preliminary report did not mention a probable cause for the crash but said visual flight conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed. A factual report followed by an analysis and probable cause is expected to take eight months to a year to complete.


Pilot Ben Soyars, 37, of Las Vegas and Steve Peterson, 32, of Rohnert Park, California, died in the crash of blunt trauma injuries, the Clark County coroner’s office has said.


Peterson was among 12 men who had traveled to Las Vegas for a bachelor party and had planned to take simulated, air-to-air combat flights on Sky Combat Ace planes with an “instructor” pilot in the back seat of each of the three aircraft and their “student” passengers in the front seat of each cockpit.


But with thunderstorms lurking near Henderson Executive Airport about 4 p.m. on April 30, members of the bachelor party had questioned the Sky Combat Ace refund policy. It says essentially that customers must go on the flights with the company’s instructor pilots or forfeit their fare money. So rather than lose more than $8,000 that the group had ponied up for the flights, three of nine who had planned to go departed in three of the company’s planes about 4:30 p.m.


“Information provided by the company representatives revealed that the accident plane departed and rendezvoused with two other company airplanes to conduct a simulated air to air combat mission,” the NTSB report says. “Two airplanes at a time would maneuver against each other while the other airplane observed from a safe distance.”


After the simulated air-combat maneuvers, all three aircraft returned toward the Henderson airport. But after the first two airplanes landed “and realized that the third airplane behind them did not return … the company launched an airplane to conduct a search,” the report reads.


The wreckage was discovered a short time later near a hilltop.


All major components of the airplane were located in the debris path, according to the preliminary investigation report.


Sky Combat Ace President Richard Coe has not returned phone calls to the Las Vegas Review-Journal seeking comment.


Original article can be found here: http://www.reviewjournal.com




Two men who died in a stunt plane near Las Vegas were performing "air combat" maneuvers with two other planes before crashing near a hilltop, according to a preliminary report.

The crash happened April 30 during a paid excursion offered by a Las Vegas tourism company with a history of noted safety issues. Sky Combat Ace allows paying customers — even those without any previous flight experience — to fly and control its acrobatic planes. The Federal Aviation Administration allows anyone to fly a plane as long as there is a licensed pilot alongside to provide instruction.

A preliminary report issued by the National Transportation Safety Board indicates the fixed-wing single-engine plane crashed about a half hour after take-off from Henderson Executive Airport.

It hit mountainous terrain about 12 miles south of the airport and left an 800-foot-long path of debris near a hilltop west of the dry lake beds near the town of Jean, about 30 miles south of Las Vegas. All of the major parts of the plane were recovered and will be further examined for the final accident report expected months from now.

Pilot Benjamin Anderson Soyars, 37, of Las Vegas, and Steve Anthony Peterson, a 32-year-old customer from Rohnert Park, California, were found dead. Their deaths were ruled accidental by the coroner's office.

The NTSB investigators said they were told by representatives of the parent company, Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC, that the fatal flight went up for a "simulated air to air combat mission" with two other airplanes. The exercise allowed two planes to "maneuver against each other" while a third watched from a distance.

Company spokeswoman Megan Fazio initially claimed no other planes were involved but on Wednesday confirmed the other planes noted in the crash report. She also said video footage of the exercise taken from the air is not being released.

Fazio had also initially claimed an "incident free" safety record but has since refused to answer questions about at least five documented safety concerns formally noted in FAA and NTSB records from the past five years the business has been in operation. None of those cases resulted in injury, though one incident in March 2015 involved the same Sky Combat Ace airplane that crashed April 30.

Fazio had said the passenger paid for and had performed the "Sky Combat" experience. The website indicates the tour package allows the student to fly the plane while the instructor teaches "the art of aerial dogfighting."

The NTSB report said the company that afternoon realized the plane was missing and launched another airplane to search for it after the two others landed back at the airport. The crash report noted that visibility was found to be sufficient at the time. There was no flight plan filed.

The company, which also operates in San Diego, offers aerobatic, air combat and sightseeing flight experiences with package prices ranging from $150 to $2,000, according to its website. Its signature offering allows customers to fly stunt planes with instructors' supervision.





Steven Anthony "Scuba" PETERSON
 (1983 - 2016)



Steven Anthony "Scuba" Peterson, of Rohnert Park passed away on April 30, 2016 at the age of 32. Steve was born on October 5, 1983 in Santa Rosa, CA to Robert and Jackie Peterson, and was a lifelong resident of Sonoma County. Steve grew up in Rohnert Park and graduated from Rancho Cotati High School in 2002. It was in high school that Steve developed a passion for working with his hands and tools on engines. He made a career for himself at Peterson CAT where he went through extensive schooling and training to become a certified Electric Power Generation Technician, in which he worked on large diesel engines and generators; often times keeping hospitals powered during emergencies, and being called upon 24 hours a days seven days a week in response to urgent situations requiring his expertise. Steve's strong work ethic and his positive attitude during challenging times were admired by all those around him. Steve was a genuine friend, loving brother and son, and devoted husband who always made family and friends his top priority. Many looked to Steve and depended on him for support and guidance in all aspects of life. He was extremely passionate about the outdoors, and enjoyed hunting, fishing, and diving in his spare time. He made a point of living every moment to its fullest. Steve is survived by his wife, Jennifer Leah, their unborn daughter Avery Rose, his parents Robert and Jackie, his older brother Mike, his twin brother Chris, and twin sisters Christine and Jennifer. Steve's spirit brought so much love, joy, and laughter to all those he encountered. He will forever be remembered and greatly missed by all that knew him. A memorial service will be held at Pleasant Hill Memorial Park, 1700 Pleasant Hill Rd., Sebastopol, CA 95472 at 11:00 a.m., Saturday May 7, 2016. 

The family requests that any donations in Steven's memory be made at: http://gofundme.com/stevenpeterson 



Benjamin Anderson Soyars, III
October 10, 1978 - April 30, 2016 
Resided in Las Vegas, NV 

Obituary
Benjamin Anderson Soyars, III, "Ben", age 37, died on Saturday, April 30th, 2016 while living in Nevada. He was the son of Benjamin A. Soyars, Jr. and Ellen H. Soyars; brother of Lindsay Soyars Ward & her husband, Casey; and uncle of Catherine Finley Ward. He also leaves behind his long-time love, Charity Elam and her daughter Wynnter of Richmond.

Ben grew up in Warrenton and attended Highland School before leaving for prep school and college. He then moved to Arizona to attend flight school. Ever since boyhood, Ben had a passion for flying. He was a highly accomplished pilot and instructor logging over 9, 000 hours in various types of planes, from small aerobatic aircraft to corporate jets. He will be remembered by many for his bright smile, his quick wit, and his engaging personality.

A memorial gathering will be held at the Airlie Conference Center Smokehouse, 6809 Airlie Rd., Warrenton, VA 20187 on Saturday, May 21st, 2016 from 1 to 4 pm, where family and friends are invited to share stories, pictures and memories of times spent together with Ben.


A Sky Combat Ace stunt plane sits on truck bed after its pilot made an emergency landing Oct. 26, 2014 at McCarran International Airport with a passenger on board. National Transportation Safety Board investigators determined that the pilot experienced a control issue with the aircraft during spin maneuver when a rudder cable failed.


Sky Combat Ace instructor pilot Ben Soyars, 37, of Las Vegas, is shown with an unidentified person in an August 2015 post from his Facebook page. Soyars and Steve Peterson, 32, of Rohnert Park, Calif., (not shown) were killed Saturday when their plane crashed near Jean. (Ben Soyar/Facebook)


Sky Combat Ace instructor pilot Ben Soyars, 37, of Las Vegas, right, is shown with an unidentified person in an August 2015 post from his Facebook page. Soyars and Steve Peterson, 32, of Rohnert Park, Calif., (not shown) were killed Saturday when their plane crashed near Jean. (Ben Soyar/Facebook)


Officials from the Clark County Department of Aviation, Clark County Fire Department, Henderson Fire Department, and Henderson Police Department respond to an airplane crash at the southern edge of the Henderson Executive Airport in Henderson on Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014. 



The same stunt plane that crashed Saturday, killing a Sky Combat Ace pilot and his passenger, had been involved in a dangerous, low-flying maneuver in 2015 over the Colorado River south of Hoover Dam, according to Federal Aviation Administration officials.


A pending enforcement action letter, obtained by the Las Vegas Review-Journal through a Freedom of Information Act request, proposes to suspend the commercial pilot and flight instructor certificates of Denis Richard Boissonneault of Las Vegas for 135 days for violating FAA regulations during a March 16, 2015, flight from Henderson Executive Airport.


“On takeoff … you abruptly pitched up the aircraft in a manner not normal for takeoff of an Extra,” the letter reads, referring to the Extra EA300 aircraft with tail No. N330MT.


The letter also states Boissonneault executed “an aileron roll,” commonly known as a barrel roll, “below 1,500 feet above the surface over the Colorado River.”


An FAA official familiar with the incident said Thursday the FAA was alerted to the low, aerobatic flight by Bureau of Reclamation police at Hoover Dam who saw the plane flying south of the dam.


The FAA official said Boissonneault had a passenger in the plane and that such maneuvers below 1,500 feet above the surface are prohibited by FAA regulations.


“Your operation of N330MT, in the manner and circumstances … was careless or reckless so as to endanger the life or property of another,” reads the Sept. 9, 2015, letter to Boissonneault.


Attempts to reach Boissonneault on Thursday were unsuccessful.


Messages seeking comment from Sky Combat Ace President Richard “Tex” Coe left on the company’s answering machine also were not returned.


A profile of Denis “Smokey” Boissonneault on Sky Combat Ace’s website says, “His favorite thing to do is to share his passion with anyone who wants to learn about the joy of flight, particularly advanced aerobatics!”


FAA officials confirmed that the two-seat, single-engine aircraft Boissonneault flew south of Hoover Dam on March 16, 2015, is the same one that crashed Saturday near Jean killing a passenger, Steve Peterson, 32, of Rohnert Park, California, and Sky Combat Ace instructor pilot Ben Soyars, 37, of Las Vegas.


BACHELOR PARTY DEATHS


Peterson and his twin brother, Chris Peterson, were among 12 friends who had traveled to Las Vegas for a bachelor party. Nine from the group were supposed to fly in at least three Sky Combat Ace stunt planes as part of a simulated air-combat and bombing run experience they had planned months in advance through Vegas Extreme Adventures.


With thunderstorms in the area, some members of the group declined to go on the flights. But Steve Peterson and two others decided to go to avoid forfeiting the more than $8,000 in fares in keeping with the company’s non-refund policy, one member of the group has said.


The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating Saturday’s fatal stunt plane accident near Jean. The FAA is also investigating Sky Combat Ace on legal grounds to see if the company was in compliance with its regulations at the time of Saturday’s accident.


Vegas Extreme Adventures, which does business as Sky Combat Ace, had issued a statement after Saturday’s plane crash saying the company has provided “instructional aerobatic airplane rides to the general public since 2011 and has conducted over 15,000 incident-free flights over the last 5 years.”


When asked about its “incident-free” claim Tuesday, Vegas Extreme Adventures publicist Megan Fazio released a revised statement that reads, “Up until this tragic accident on April 30th, 2016, there have been exactly zero injuries to customers at Sky Combat Ace. That is 5 years and 15,000 flights.”


Records obtained by the Review-Journal, however, show there have been two close-call incidents in which pilots and passengers narrowly escaped injuries. And, there have been numerous complaints about Sky Combat Ace’s flights over Henderson neighborhoods and elsewhere in Southern Nevada filed with local authorities and the FAA.


RECORD OF PROBLEMS


On Oct. 26, 2014, a Sky Combat Ace stunt plane made an emergency landing at McCarran International Airport with a passenger on board after performing an aerobatic spin maneuver. National Transportation Safety Board investigators determined that the pilot’s control problem stemmed from a rudder cable that had failed.


The next month, a Sky Combat Ace aircraft was forced to land on a street near the Henderson airport after the pilot experienced a partial loss of engine power. The accident caused substantial damage to the plane’s right wing.


FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said Sky Combat Ace had been granted a waiver in 2011 to carry passengers for hire while flying in formation but the waiver was suspended for a month in 2012 after the agency investigated a complaint that the company’s aircraft flew in formation at 500 feet above ground level contrary to provisions of the waiver.


The waiver was revoked Aug. 30, 2012, “based on a second complaint involving low-flying aircraft near the Hoover Dam,” Gregor said.


Las Vegas trial lawyer Robert W. Cottle said Thursday he is representing a mechanic in a claim against Sky Combat Ace. He said his client was run over in January by a Sky Combat Ace plane that was taxiing at the south end of the Henderson Airport.


“Fortunately he’s alive,” Cottle said about the mechanic who works for an air service company at the airport.


“He turned around to catch the red plane in the corner of his eye. That’s when the plane ran over the top of him and his foot was struck by the wheel,” he said, adding that the mechanic remained flat on the tarmac to avoid being struck by the propeller.


Original article can be found here:  http://www.reviewjournal.com 



 LAS VEGAS - The two men killed when a stunt plane crashed near Las Vegas were performing “air combat” maneuvers as part of a paid flight experience provided by a tourism company catering to extreme adventure-seekers.

Benjamin Anderson Soyars of Las Vegas, and Steve Anthony Peterson of Rohnert Park, California, died Saturday of blunt force injuries, according to the Clark County Coroner’s office. Their deaths have been ruled an accident.

The company, Sky Combat Ace, on its website describes Soyars, 37, as a veteran pilot with a background in competition and airshow flying. The company allows customers to fly stunt planes with instructors’ supervision.

The company didn’t identify the two men by name but said it was a student passenger and an instructor pilot.

It’s unclear who was flying the plane at the time of the crash.

“I cannot say who was in control at the time of the accident, as that would be speculation,” company spokesman Megan Fazio said Monday. “We won’t have the results until the FAA releases them following the completion of the investigation.”

The company said it has been providing instructional aerobatic airplane rides since 2011 and has had 15,000 incident-free flights in the past five years.

Fazio said the passenger paid for and had performed the “Sky Combat” experience and that the accident happened as they were returning to the hangar. The website indicates the tour package allows the student to fly the plane while the instructor teaches “the art of aerial dogfighting.” No other planes were involved.

The parent company, Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC, said in a statement that the fixed-wing single-engine plane took off from Henderson Executive Airport at 4 p.m. Saturday but didn’t return from its outing on time. They learned of the crash about 4:45 p.m., after calling air traffic control to report the missing Extra 300 airplane. No distress calls were made before the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration said it’s investigating. Records show the aircraft’s airworthiness was classified standard and categorized for normal and acrobatic flights. It was built in 2011 and had up to date certification.

The National Transportation Safety Board was also called to investigate but couldn’t immediately provide details.

http://www.rgj.com





CLARK COUNTY (KTNV) - A man from California was one of two people killed in a plane crash in rural Clark County Saturday evening.

The incident happened several miles east of I-15 near Jean, near State Route 604 and Southern Nevada Liteweight Road.


The plane is a Extra EA-330LC. Records indicate the plane belonged to a Henderson company called Vegas Extreme Adventures, also known as Sky Combat Ace. The business offers customers acrobatic stunt rides.


One of the plane's occupants was identified as 32-year-old Steve Peterson of Rohnert Park, Calif. 13 Action News learned Peterson leaves behind a pregnant wife who's expecting a baby in June.


A student pilot at the facility said this was a shocking tragedy.


"My heart just sank," said Dan Koury. "Right away it was just like oh my God, it's a tragedy for anyone to die in a plane crash but somehow it hits closer to home when you know the people who are out there. It's just a really sick feeling to my stomach."


According to a statement from Vegas Extreme Adventures, the plane took off from Henderson Executive Airport around 4 p.m. When the aircraft failed to return on time, employees notified air traffic control of the missing airplane and immediately launched an aircraft for search and rescue operations.


At approximately 4:45 p.m., the crash site was located and called in to the Henderson Executive Airport Control Tower, who in turn notified emergency personnel of the location of the crash near the Jean dry lakebed.


There was 1 student passenger and 1 instructor pilot onboard the plane. When emergency responders arrived, both occupants were pronounced dead at the scene. To Vegas Extreme Adventures' knowledge, there were no distress calls made prior to the accident.


"On behalf of all Vegas Extreme Adventures employees and staff, we would like to express our deepest condolences to the families who have lost loved ones and have been affected by this unfortunate accident," according to the statement. "Vegas Extreme Adventures is working closely and cooperating with the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board to determine the cause of the accident."


According to the statement, Vegas Extreme Adventures has been providing instructional aerobatic airplane rides to the general public since 2011 and has conducted more than 15,000 incident-free flights over the last 5 years.


Story and video:  http://www.ktnv.com




LAS VEGAS (FOX5) -  A plane involved in a deadly crash Saturday  evening originated from Henderson Executive Airport. 

The company, Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC, released a statement Sunday following the crash. 

According to the statement, an Extra EA-330LC plane registered to Vegas Extreme Adventures left from Henderson Executive Airport at about 4 p.m. Saturday. When the aircraft did not return on time, employees notified air traffic control of the missing plane, and immediately launched an aircraft for search and rescue operations. 

The crash site was located about 4:45 p.m., and Henderson Executive Airport was notified of the crash site near the Jean dry lake bed, the statement said. 

An instructor pilot, and student passenger were aboard the plane, and pronounced dead at the scene by emergency personnel, the statement said. The company did not release the identities of the deceased. 

The company said it was not aware of any distress calls prior to the crash. 

The statement said the company is working with the Federal Aviation Administration, and the National Transportation Safety Board to determine the cause of the crash. 

Vegas Extreme Adventures said it has been providing instructional aerobatic airplane rides to the general public since 2011. The company said it has conducted more than 15,000 incident-free flights during the past five years. 

Story and video: http://www.fox5vegas.com


A single-engine aircraft that crashed Saturday amid dark skies and rain, killing an instructor pilot and a passenger, belonged to a tourism fighter plane company that allows customers to operate planes with instructors’ assistance.

Authorities were alerted about 5 p.m. Saturday that an Extra EA-330LC aircraft belonging to Sky Combat Ace had crashed minutes earlier about 4 miles east of Las Vegas Boulevard and a half-mile south of 8 Mile Mine Road, Henderson Executive Airport spokeswoman Linda Healey said Sunday. Earlier reports had suggested the crash occurred farther south.


The plane had taken off about 4 p.m., said Megan Fazio of Sky Combat Ace's parent company, Vegas Extreme Adventures. The company sent out a search plane, then learned just after 4:45 p.m. that the missing plane had crashed near a Jean dry lake bed, Fazio said. Both people killed in the crash were men, she said; the Clark County Coroner’s office will identify them.


No distress calls were received from the plane, Fazio said.


About the same time the plane took off, thunderstorms moving southwest from Boulder City were blanketing the area of the crash, National Weather Service meteorologist Caleb Steele said Sunday. The plane “almost certainly” would have been flying in stormy weather if it was anywhere near the area of the crash, he said.


Sky Combat Ace, which operates out of Henderson as well as Gillespie Field near San Diego, bills itself as offering a “whole new level of adrenaline” on its website and touts a “perfect safety record,” with no injuries reported since its opening in 2011. It also states that it operates “7 days a week, 365 days a year."


The company compares the passenger experience to that of “a steely-eyed fighter pilot at the controls of your very own fighter jet, pulling Gs and squeezing the trigger.” It says its planes are equipped with dual flight controls, allowing an instructor pilot to take over in the “unlikely event that it becomes necessary."


Metro Police and the Clark County Fire Department did not respond to questions about whether a passenger or a pilot was in control at the time of the crash. A sign at Sky Combat Ace's Henderson office said the business will be closed until May 9.


The National Transportation Safety Board is taking over the investigation, Healey said.


Original article can be found here:  http://lasvegassun.com





LAS VEGAS (KSNV News3LV) — Two people were killed Saturday afternoon when an acrobatic aircraft crashed near the California state line.

The plane was identified as an Extra EA-330LC.

The tail number, N330MT, is registered to Vegas Extreme Adventures, LLC and the registration says it was usually flown out of Henderson Executive Airport.

Vegas Extreme Adventures released a statement, with the following:

On behalf of all Vegas Extreme Adventures employees and staff, we would like to express our deepest condolences to the families who have lost loved ones and have been affected by this unfortunate accident. Vegas Extreme Adventures is working closely and cooperating with the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board to determine the cause of the accident.  Vegas Extreme Adventures LLC has been providing instructional aerobatic airplane rides to the general public since 2011 and has conducted over 15,000 incident-free flights over the last 5 years.

Metro said it received a call that a small single-engine plane went down in the area west of the dry lake beds near Jean, about 5 p.m.

Because of the weather and remote location, Metro Search and Rescue were responding for assistance and recovery, along with the Clark County Fire Department.

CCFD Chief John Steinbeck says Engine 65 was first on the scene, but that it was difficult to find, about four miles east of Las Vegas Blvd near 8 Mile Rd.

Chief Steinbeck says arriving responders found two people deceased at the scene, with one still in their seat and the other thrown 40 feet from the plane.

McCarran Airport said the plane went down about nine miles south of Henderson Executive Airport and was reported to authorities by the pilot of another aircraft.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.

The Clark County coroner's office will release the names of the two killed after relatives have been notified.

Story and video:  http://news3lv.com




Two people were killed Saturday when a single-engine plane crashed Saturday evening near the state line and Nipton Road, Las Vegas police said.

Police and emergency crews responded to the area after receiving a call about a small single-engine plane that crashed about 5 p.m., Metro said.

An initial report said the crash had occurred west of the dry lake beds near Jean, but Metro later said the location was “best described as State Line and Nipton Road.”

Arriving emergency crews located two deceased occupants, police said just after 6 p.m.

McCarran International Airport spokeswoman Linda Healy said the plane was a single-engine EXTRA EA300. The Clark County Fire Department responded to the scene, she said.

According to its website, EXTRA is a manufacturer of aerobatic airplanes and variants of the EA300 are flown by demonstration teams for companies like Red Bull and Breitling.

Details were not immediately available about where the plane was coming from or where it was headed, or if the weather played a role in the crash.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash, police said.

Original article can be found here: http://www.reviewjournal.com  

A plane operated by a company that lets customers engage in mock dogfights made an emergency landing on a Henderson street today after possibly experiencing a mechanical problem, officials said.

The Extra 330 LC plane was carrying two people when it landed on Volunteer Boulevard, stopping at the southern perimeter fence of Henderson Executive Airport, said Christine Crews, a spokeswoman for the Clark County Department of Aviation.

Nobody was hurt, but the aircraft sustained major damage, Crews said.

The plane, operated by Sky Combat Ace, took off from the airport at 11:15 a.m., according to a statement from the company. At about 11:40 a.m., air traffic controllers reported the pilot had declared an emergency and had to land.

City of Henderson spokeswoman Kathleen Richards said the aircraft may have had a mechanical issue but the cause of the problem would be determined by the National Transportation Safety Board.

On idle power, the plane was able to glide and descend for about two miles before landing about a quarter mile short of the airport runway, the company said. Henderson police and firefighters responded.

There was one Sky Combat Ace employee and one passenger on board, the company statement said.

Sky Combat Ace allows customers to engage in aerial dogfights and maneuver the aircraft once they reach 6,000 feet, company spokeswoman Megan Fazio said. Customers are not involved in takeoffs or landings, she said.

Sky Combat Ace is working with the Federal Aviation Administration and the NTSB to determine the cause of the incident, the company said.

In more than three years of operations and with in excess of 14,000 customer flights, Sky Combat Ace has not had an aircraft accident, the company said. Its pilots are trained for emergency landings, the statement said.

Story, comments and photo gallery: http://www.lasvegassun.com









HENDERSON, NV (FOX5) -  A small plane landed on a road near the Henderson Executive Airport on Wednesday morning.

Christine Crews, of McCarran International Airport, said the Extra 330 private aircraft landed near the intersection of Volunteer Boulevard and Executive Airport Road around 11:50 a.m., about a quarter-mile short of the runway.

Crews said the plane ended up crashing into the fence that surrounds the airport. She said the pilot did not contact the tower before the crash, but did after the landing to let authorities know about the situation.

No injuries were reported, Crews said.

A crane has been called in to remove the aircraft from the road, Crews said.

Crews said the National Transportation Safety Board will conduct an investigation.

Story and Comments: http://www.fox5vegas.com




Henderson, NV (KTNV) -- A small plane landed just short of the airport on Wednesday. 

Around 11:46 a.m. an EXTRA 330 aircraft with 2 people on board made a hard landing in Henderson.

The plane came down on Volunteer Boulevard and went into the fence surrounding Henderson Executive Airport, about one-fourth of a mile short of the runway.

There were no injuries or fire, but the plane did have major damage.

The pilot did not call into the control tower prior to the landing, so there are no details yet as to why the plane went down.

The plane, operated by Sky Combat Ace, has released the following statement:

Sky Combat Ace is working closely with the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board and the investigation to determine the cause of the incident and will release the final cause upon completion of the investigation.

The FAA, The National Transportation Safety Board, Fire, police, EMS and medical examiners were on call per airport protocol and responded immediately after Air Traffic Control gained knowledge of where the plane was going to land. The area is sealed off and restricted only to those personnel. Sky Combat Ace personnel are also at the site and are doing everything they can to be helpful to the investigation.

Volunteer Boulevard is currently closed.

- Source:  http://www.jrn.com 


 HENDERSON (KSNV MyNews3.com) – A small plane affiliated with Sky Combat Ace made an emergency landing Wednesday morning near Henderson Executive Airport. 

 The Extra 330 with two people aboard was forced to land just after 11:45 a.m. about a quarter-mile south of Henderson Runway 3/5L on Volunteer Boulevard near Via Inspirada, said Christine Crews, spokesperson for the Clark County Aviation Department, which operates the airport. The pilot then steered the aircraft into the perimeter fence.

Both people aboard were unharmed and left the aircraft on their own power. The plane sustained major damage, Crews said. According to the FAA, the plane is registered to “Unmanned Systems Inc.” based in Henderson.

"Sky Combat Ace is working closely with the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board and the investigation to determine the cause of the incident and will release the final cause upon completion of the investigation," according to a statement released for the company by Neon Public Relations.

"The FAA, The National Transportation Safety Board, Fire, police, EMS and medical examiners were on call per airport protocol and responded immediately after Air Traffic Control gained knowledge of where the plane was going to land. The area is sealed off and restricted only to those personnel. Sky Combat Ace personnel are also at the site and are doing everything they can to be helpful to the investigation."

The pilot did not contact the tower until after the plane landed, Crews said. Names of the pilot and passenger were not released.

The Henderson Police and Fire departments responded to the accident.


- Source:  http://www.mynews3.com 

HENDERSON, Nev. — A small plane crashed into a fence Wednesday morning on the outskirts of the Henderson Executive Airport. 

Two people were onboard but were not hurt in the crash, officials said.

The two-seater struck a fence off Volunteer Boulevard just before noon. No cars were involved.

The plane is owned by Sky Combat Ace, which operates out of the airport. In a news release, the company said it was working with the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board in the crash investigation.

The pilot worked for Sky Combat Ace, a release said.

Other details surrounding the crash, including the cause, have not been released.

Story and Comments:  http://www.8newsnow.com















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