Monday, March 9, 2015

Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, N6514P: Fatal accident occurred March 09, 2015 near Page Field Airport (KFMY), Fort Myers,Florida

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf
























































AIRCRAFT: 1959 Piper PA-24-250 Comanche N6514P, s/n 24-1636 

At the time of the loss, the aircraft total time was 8158.43. 

The last annual inspection was performed on 09/02/2014 at 8109.57 TT
                                                              
ENGINE:  Lycoming 0-540-A1B5, s/n 1006240, with a Total Time Since New of 2526.38

The last Annual Inspection was performed on 09/02/2014 at TT 2477.52, and TSMOH 1209.52

PROPELLER:  Hartzell HC-A2VK-1, s/n J973, with TT 8113.83 and TSMOH of 77

The last Annual Inspection was on 09/02/2014, at PTT 8064.97, PTSMO 44.6

EQUIPMENT:  
Audio Panel, KA134 TSO
DME, KN64
(2) NAV/COM & GS, KX 155 TSO
ADF 141 TSO
GPS, Garmin 430  50 IFR
Transponder TSO
           
DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Pilot reported an "engine out" condition on approach to Page Field Airport, Fort Myers (KFMY) and landed N6514P in a parking lot impacting a storage POD and a pickup truck. 

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:  Damage includes but may not be limited to the following:   

The engine and instrument panel forward are separated from the fuselage. 

There is damage to both wings and throughout the airframe.

The horizontal stabilizer and all control surfaces are damaged.

 LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  Charlotte County Airport, Punta Gorda, Florida - in a fully enclosed hangar.  The aircraft was originally retrieved to the Lee County Airport and subsequently further disassembled and relocated to Charlotte County Airport.

REMARKS: Aircraft disassembled for transport.

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N6514P.html

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA149
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, March 09, 2015 in Fort Myers, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/14/2015
Aircraft: PIPER PA-24-250, registration: N6514P
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, about 10 miles from the destination airport, he switched the left and right fuel tanks from the auxiliary position to the main tank position. On final approach for landing and when the airplane was at an altitude of about 500 ft, the engine stopped producing power. The propeller continued to rotate, but the engine did not respond to throttle inputs. The pilot stated that he then switched the fuel selectors from the main tank position back to the auxiliary tank position and turned on the electric fuel boost pumps, but the engine did not regain power. He added that, each time he moved the fuel selectors, he visually confirmed their position. The pilot performed a forced landing to a parking lot, during which the airframe aft of the engine compartment was fractured and the fuselage was substantially damaged. There was no odor of fuel or evidence of fuel spillage at the accident scene; however, the fuel caps were removed, and large quantities of fuel were found in each wing tank. Examination of the cockpit revealed that both the left and right tank fuel selectors were in the “off” position and that the fuel selector position decal had been displaced upward and over each handle by impact forces, which indicates that the fuel selectors were in the “off” position at impact and not moved subsequently. Continuity of the fuel system was confirmed from all four fuel tanks, through the fuel selectors, to the fuel supply line forward of the firewall. The engine was test run, and it started immediately, accelerated smoothly, and ran without interruption at all power settings. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's inadvertent placement of both fuel selectors to the "off" position, which resulted in fuel starvation and a total loss of engine power.

On March 9, 2015, about 1410 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-24-250, N6514P, was substantially damaged during collision with a vehicle and storage container after a total loss of engine power on final approach to Page Field Airport (FMY), Fort Meyers, Florida. The private pilot was seriously injured and the passenger was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight departed St. Pete-Clearwater International Airport (PIE) about 1335 and was destined for FMY.

In a telephone interview, the pilot stated the airplane's fuel tanks contained about 85 gallons of fuel prior to departure. He said that preflight inspection, engine start, engine run-up, taxi and takeoff were as expected and that "all systems were normal." The pilot took off and climbed the airplane to 3,500 feet. About 10 miles from FMY, the pilot contacted air traffic control (ATC), and he was instructed to report again at 4 miles from the airport. The pilot moved the fuel selectors from the auxiliary to main tank positions. At 4 miles from FMY, the pilot contacted ATC and configured the airplane for landing.

On final approach for landing, at an altitude about 500 feet, the engine stopped producing power. The propeller continued to rotate, but the engine did not respond to throttle inputs. The pilot switched the fuel selectors back to the auxiliary tank position and turned on the electric fuel boost pumps, but never regained engine power. The pilot said that each time he moved the fuel selectors, he visually confirmed their position. The pilot performed a forced landing to a parking lot which fractured the airframe aft of the engine compartment and substantially damaged the fuselage.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed no odor of fuel, or evidence of fuel spillage at the scene; however, removal of the fuel caps revealed large quantities of fuel in each wing. The engine controls were all "full forward" and both fuel selectors were in the "Off:" position. The fuel selector position decal was displaced upward, and over each handle by impact forces.

The wreckage was moved to Buckingham Field, Lehigh Acres, Florida, and was secured in a hanger for further examination.

The airplane was examined by FAA Inspectors on March 12, 2015. Flight control continuity was established, and the engine cowlings were opened. Approximately 1 ounce of fuel was drained from the carburetor which was clear and absent of water or debris. The engine appeared undamaged, and the examination was suspended. The engine was then removed from the airplane, and shipped to the manufacturer's facility for a detailed examination.

On April 23, 2015, the airplane was defueled, and continuity of the fuel system was confirmed from all four fuel tanks, through the fuel selectors, to the fuel supply line forward of the firewall.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He reported 410 total hours of flight experience, of which "more than" 10 hours were in the accident airplane make and model. His most recent FAA third class medical certificate was issued on February 24, 2015.

The airplane was manufactured in 1959 and was equipped with a Lycoming O-540 series, 250 hp, reciprocating engine. It's most recent annual inspection was completed September 2, 2014, at 8,109 total aircraft hours.

The airplane was equipped with individual fuel selectors for the fuel tanks positioned in the left and right wings, respectively. The fuel selectors had three positions; Main, Tip, and Off. The left selector was rotated counterclockwise from the 12-o'clock (Main) position thru the 9-o'clock (Tip) position to the 6-o'clock (Off) position. The right fuel selector was rotated clockwise from the 12-o'clock, thru the 3-o'clock, to the 6-o'clock in order to match the same selector settings. The selector valves then fed a single fuel supply line forward of the firewall to the engine.

On May 12, 2015, the engine was examined at the manufacturer's facility in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. The engine appeared undamaged, and was placed in a test cell where it started immediately, accelerated smoothly, and ran without interruption through a complete engine test run scenario at all power settings.

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA149 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, March 09, 2015 in Fort Myers, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA-24-250, registration: N6514P
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 9, 2015, about 1410 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-24-250, N6514P, was substantially damaged during collision with a vehicle and storage container after a total loss of engine power on final approach to Page Field Airport (FMY), Fort Meyers, Florida. The private pilot was seriously injured and the passenger was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight departed St. Pete-Clearwater International Airport (PIE) about 1335 and was destined for FMY.

In a telephone interview, the pilot stated the airplane's fuel tanks contained about 85 gallons of fuel prior to departure. He said that preflight inspection, engine start, engine run-up, taxi and takeoff were as expected and that "all systems were normal." The pilot took off and climbed the airplane to 3,500 feet. About 10 miles from FMY, the pilot contacted air traffic control (ATC), and he was instructed to report again at 4 miles from the airport. The pilot moved the fuel selectors from the auxiliary to main tank positions. At 4 miles from FMY, the pilot contacted ATC and configured the airplane for landing.

On final approach for landing, at an altitude about 500 feet, the engine stopped producing power. The propeller continued to rotate, but the engine did not respond to throttle inputs. The pilot switched the fuel selectors back to the auxiliary tank position and turned on the electric fuel boost pumps, but never regained engine power. The pilot said that each time he moved the fuel selectors, he visually confirmed their position. The pilot performed a forced landing to a parking lot which resulted in substantial damage to the engine compartment and fuselage.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed no odor of fuel, or evidence of fuel spillage at the scene; however, removal of the fuel caps revealed large quantities of fuel in each wing. The engine controls were all "full forward" and both fuel selectors were in the "Off:" position. The wreckage was moved from the accident site for a detailed examination at a later date.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He reported 450 total hours of flight experience, of which "more than" 10 hours were in the accident airplane make and model. His most recent FAA third class medical certificate was issued on February 24, 2015.

The airplane was manufactured in 1959 and was equipped with a Lycoming O-540 series, 250 hp, reciprocating engine. The airplane's maintenance history could not be immediately determined.


RALPH A. LENNEN: http://registry.faa.gov/N6514P


An 85-year-old Estero woman and her 59-year-old son from St. Petersburg were aboard the Piper plane that crash-landed in a Fort Myers parking lot Monday.

Donna Piehl and Gregory Piehl were pulled from the crumpled plane he was piloting that crashed on its approach to Page Field general aviation airport. Both were listed in serious condition Tuesday, according to a Lee Memorial Health System spokeswoman.

Lauren Piehl, Gregory Piehl's daughter, declined to comment when reached by phone.

A public records search lists Gregory Piehl as president of Impact Precision Products in Clearwater, a manufacturer of motion control systems. Calls to the business Tuesday were not answered.

Meryl Rorer, a neighbor of Donna Piehl in a small Estero community off Sandy Lane, was shocked when told her friend and her friend's son had been hurt in the crash.

"I know he's a pilot. I hadn't heard about them being in the crash. I didn't see the news," she said. "Her son must be devastated. Greg comes down now and again to help her. She has medical problems. It just breaks my heart, I worry about her."

Rorer said Donna Piehl is a kind and friendly woman. "She's the sweetest woman and a loving person."

She said Donna Piehl can be normally be seen along the roadway walking her dog. "She loves her dog so much," she said. "She has a fenced-in backyard, but she makes herself walk the dog."

Rorer said she and her husband have known Donna Piehl since they moved to the community in 2007, the year Donna Piehl's husband, Donald, died.

And, despite Donna Piehl's health problems, Rorer said the Estero woman has a sharp mind and a great spirit. "She's always smiling and happy," she said.

Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating why the four-seat 1959 Comanche landed just before noon Monday atop two vehicles and a storage container behind the White Sands Treatment Center. The plane was about a mile short of the Page Field runway.

According to data from the Federal Aviation Administration, there have been 29 plane crashes at Page Field, including Monday's, since records began being kept in 1982, around the time Page Field became a general aviation airport. There were three fatalities among those crashes.

Two of the deaths occurred during a 2002 crash involving a Raytheon 58 and the other in 1984 when a Consolidated Aeronautics Lake LA-4 crashed at the field.

Layla Cecil of Cape Coral posted on The News-Press web site that she was at a gas station nearby when the plane crashed.

"I actually saw this ... I was pumping gas at the 7/11 on Colonial right before 41," she wrote. "I saw the plane out of the corner of my eye and turned to see a low-flying plane. It looked like it was moving slowly and kind of wobbly. I was worried that it would hit these tall (pine?) trees that were right in its path. It rose up and amazingly didn't hit them, but then it ducked down below them rapidly."

Cecil said she waited for a crash and didn't hear one. "... so I didn't think anything of it — I knew it was weird, but I was hoping they'd made it to Page."

Cecil said she then heard the sounds of a helicopter and saw police responding.

"I was working to exit off of 41 from Colonial and turned back and saw the wreckage. I was worried they'd hit the side building of the facility there. I'm glad that wasn't the case. Still was a horrible thing to be privy to, though," she wrote.

http://www.news-press.com















































































































































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