Tuesday, January 6, 2015

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N2102P, Broad Reach Corp: Accident occurred January 06, 2015 near Hampton Roads Executive Airport (KPVG), Chesapeake, Virginia

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA094 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, January 06, 2015 in Norfolk, VA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/26/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N2102P
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The designated pilot examiner (DPE) and student pilot were conducting a private pilot check ride. The DPE reported that, during climbout, he retarded the throttle to simulate an engine failure. The student attempted to recover the airplane by lowering its nose to maintain controlled flight. However, the airplane descended. The DPE terminated the simulated engine failure, took control of the airplane, and attempted to recover full engine power, but the engine remained at idle power, and the airplane descended into trees. A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no mechanical malfunctions or failures, and the engine was test run with no anomalies noted. The reason for the engine’s failure to regain full power could not be determined. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The engine’s failure to regain full power after a simulated engine failure for reasons that could not be determined during postaccident examinations and testing.

On January 6, 2015, about 1330 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172S, N2102P, was substantially damaged when it collided with trees during a forced landing near Norfolk, Virginia. The designated pilot examiner (DPE) and student pilot were not injured. The airplane was registered to Broad Reach Corporation and operated by Eads Flight School under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the instructional flight. The flight originated from Hampton Roads Executive Airport (PVG), Norfolk, Virginia about 1300.

According to the DPE and the student pilot, during a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot check ride, the DPE retarded the throttle during climbout at an altitude of 500 feet above ground level to simulate an engine failure. He then asked the student pilot "what he would do to recover the airplane." The student pilot lowered the nose of the airplane and maintained controlled flight. As the airplane descended, the DPE asked the student pilot to turn the fuel boost pump to the "ON" position and recover the airplane. The student pilot acknowledged but did not activate the boost pump and the airplane continued to descend. The DPE terminated the simulated engine failure, took over control of the airplane and pushed the throttle forward to regain engine power. However, the engine did not respond and remained at idle rpm. The DPE verified the magneto selector was in the both position, mixture in the rich position, and asked the student pilot to verify the fuel tank selector valve was in the on/both position. The airplane continued to descend and collided with a tree line. During the collision both wings were buckled and the airplane came to rest at the base of a tree. 

An examination of the engine by a FAA inspector revealed that the propeller was bent but the exterior of the engine appeared to have minor damage. The two aft right engine mount tubes were buckled aft and broken. The engine turned over by hand and compression on all four cylinders was achieved. All eight spark plugs were removed, and with the exception of the No. 2 bottom plug being oil fouled, all other plugs were mild tan to a slight over rich soot color. All ignition leads produced a spark, with the exception of No. 2 bottom ignition lead. The lead had continuity and was not grounding out. The magneto distributor cap was removed, and the ignition lead socket was examined. The inner contact surface was clean, but the lip of the socket had some carbon traces; the carbon traces were cleaned and the cap was re-installed. The engine was cleaned with compressed air and the propeller was replaced with a serviceable replacement. Three gallons of fuel were placed in the right tank due to the left tank being compromised; and the electric fuel pump was turned on to pressurize the system and check for leaks. No leaks were found. The fuel control rigging (throttle and mixture) was checked and both maximum and minimum travel was attained with normal effort from the cockpit controls. 

It was determined that an engine run could be performed. The engine was started and allowed to warm up and all engine parameters were normal. The engine was then checked within the parameters of AD-2001-06-17, and the engine settled at an even 600 rpm idle, with a 10 to 20 rpm rise as the mixture Vernier was slowly screwed out. The magneto drop check was performed at 1,200 rpm; with about a 50 rpm drop for both magnetos. The engine was then shut down normally with the mixture control, and again restarted with no anomalies noted. 

BROAD REACH CORP: http://registry.faa.gov/N2102P 

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA094
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, January 06, 2015 in Norfolk, VA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N2102P
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 6, 2015, about 1330 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172S, N2102P, was substantially damaged when it collided with trees during a forced landing near Norfolk, Virginia. The designated pilot examiner (DPE) and student pilot were not injured. The airplane was registered to Broad Reach Corporation and operated by Eads Flight School under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the instructional flight. The flight originated from Hampton Roads Executive Airport (PVG), Norfolk, Virginia about 1300.

According to the DPE, during a FAA private pilot check ride, he retarded the throttle during climb out at an altitude of 500 feet above ground level, to simulate an engine failure. He then asked the student pilot what he would do to recover the airplane. The student pilot lowered the nose of the airplane and maintained controlled flight. As the airplane descended, the DPE asked the student pilot to turn the fuel boost pump to the "ON" position and recover the airplane. The student pilot acknowledged but did not activate the boost pump and the airplane continued to descend. The DPE took over control of the airplane and pushed the throttle forward to regain engine power. However, the engine did not regain full power and the DPE made a forced landing into trees. During the forced landing, both wings collided with trees and the airplane came to rest at the base of a tree.

The airplane was recovered for further examination, and it was determined that an engine run could be performed. The engine was started and ran at idle power. After engine warm up the throttle was advanced and a magneto check was completed. During the engine run no anomalies were noted that would preclude normal operation.



SUFFOLK - A small plane experiencing engine trouble made a crash landing Tuesday in a swampy area in Suffolk about a mile southwest of the Hampton Roads Executive Airport in Chesapeake. 

The pilot and passenger walked away from the single-engine Cessna and made it to the airport, according to Corinne Geller, a Virginia State Police spokeswoman. 

The passenger suffered a minor injury to his hand, Geller wrote in a news release. 

Police on Wednesday said it was a training flight. Russell Kinder, 32, of Norfolk, was a student pilot, and Martin Arthur, 57, of Virginia Beach, was the flight instructor.

State police were notified of the crash about 2:30 p.m. The plane is in a remote section of swamp, and police are working with the state Department of Game and Inland Fisheries’ Conservation Police to provide four-wheel-drive equipment to reach the site. 

Law enforcement and emergency crews from Chesapeake and Suffolk responded. 


The Federal Aviation Administration was on the scene Wednesday, and the National Transportation Safety Board has been notified. 


SUFFOLK, Va. (WAVY) – A small plane crashed in a heavily wooded area near the Hampton Roads Executive Airport on Route 58 Tuesday afternoon.

Suffolk Police and Fire & Rescue, and Chesapeake Police and Fire all responded to the scene around 2:30 p.m., but Virginia State Police is handling the investigation.

There were two men in the single-engine Cessna. They walked to the airport from the crash scene and reported the incident, according to City of Suffolk spokeswoman Diana Klink.

The victims told investigators the plane began experiencing engine trouble and they had to crash land in a swampy area about a mile into the woods near the Suffolk/Chesapeake line. One of the men received a minor injury to his hand, but otherwise they escaped unharmed, according to State Police.

The Virginia of Game & Inland Fisheries’ Conservation Police is providing four-wheel drive equipment to help law enforcement reach the plane.

The Federal Aviation Administration and NTSB were both notified.

Story, video and photo:  http://wavy.com






















SUFFOLK -- A plane is down in a swampy area in Suffolk, near the Hampton Roads Executive Airport in Chesapeake.

Capt. Scott Saunders with the Chesapeake Fire Department confirms to 13News Now they have two people with minor injuries. 

The two refused treatment at the scene, a source told 13News Now.

The airplane went down in a private lane after overshooting the runway to the north.

Saunders confirmed that crews have gotten to the plane.

Va. State Police spokeswoman Corinne Geller said the small plane is in a swampy area west of the airport.

"Both the pilot and passenger walked away from the plane and returned to the airport on foot," Geller said in a press release.   "Only the passenger suffered a minor injury to his hand."

The report came in around 2:30 p.m. Fire crews -- as well as State Police -- have been out here since then.

Geller added that the Federal Aviation Administration has been notified.

Story and photos:  http://www.13newsnow.com







Suffolk, Va. – Suffolk and Chesapeake fire crews have responded after a plane down in the 5100 block of W. Military Hwy. 

The call came in at 2:23 p.m. on Tuesday. Crews responded to the Hampton Roads Executive Airport at 2:30 p.m., fire officials tell NewsChannel 3.

Police say a single-engine Cessna started to have engine problems so they made a crash landing into a swampy area in Suffolk. The crash site is about one mile southwest of the airport. Both the pilot and the passenger walked away from the plane and to the airport.

The passenger suffered a minor injury to his hand.

State police are now working with the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries Conservation to provide four-wheel drive equipment so officials are able to get to the plane.

Chesapeake and Suffolk officials are investigating this case.



Source:   http://wtkr.com




A plane crashed near the Hampton Roads Executive Airport Tuesday afternoon, Virginia State Police said.

The accident happened about 2:30 p.m., when the aircraft landed into a nearby swamp, state police spokeswoman Corinne Geller said.

The plane was about three-quarters of a mile away from the airport, said Chesapeake Fire Department spokesman Capt. Scott Saunders.

The pilot of the plane apparently overshot the runway, Suffolk officials said in a news release, but both he and another man in the plane managed to walk away from the crash in Suffolk near its border with Chesapeake.

The two minor injuries and declined to be taken to a hospital, said Chesapeake Fire Department spokesman Capt. Scott Saunders.

Officials from both cities are at the scene, and Virginia State Police, who is investigating the incident, said the FAA has been notified.

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