Sunday, July 13, 2014

Steen Skybolt, N849CA, Aviation Pursuits, Inc: Fatal accident occurred July 13, 2014 in Carrollton, Georgia

NTSB Identification: ERA14FA339
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 13, 2014 in Carrollton, GA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/06/2015
Aircraft: ALLEN STEEN SKYBOLT, registration: N849CA
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot, who was the airplane owner, was on a local, pleasure flight. Witnesses observed the airplane flying low followed by a rapid pitch down or loss of airplane control. The airplane struck a tree about 60 ft above the ground and continued another 46 ft until it struck the ground. Most of the wreckage was consumed in a postaccident fire. 

Primary flight control continuity was confirmed from the control surfaces to the cockpit controls. All of the airplane’s primary structural components were accounted for within the wreckage debris field. Several tree branches with smooth, angular cuts, indicative of contact with a propeller under power, were observed within the wreckage debris field. A disassembly and examination of the engine revealed no evidence of a preexisting mechanical malfunction or failure. A cable attachment bracket for the elevator trim tab was found fractured; however, examination of the fracture surface revealed overstress signatures, and no evidence of a preexisting anomaly was found. Thus, the fracture likely occurred during the impact sequence.

The pilot, who had owned the airplane for about 15 years, only flew it occasionally, and his last logged flight in the accident airplane was more than 1 year before the accident flight. The pilot’s autopsy and toxicology reports revealed no evidence of incapacitation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
An in-flight loss of airplane control for reasons that could not be determined during postaccident examinations or based on the available evidence.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 13, 2014, about 1725 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Allen Steen Skybolt, N849CA, was destroyed following an inflight loss of control and a collision with trees and terrain near Carrollton, Georgia. The commercial pilot and one passenger were fatally injured. The experimental, amateur-built airplane was registered to a corporation and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated from West Georgia Regional Airport, Carrollton, Georgia, about 1640. 

Reportedly, the pilot was on a local area pleasure flight with his grandson. Several witnesses observed the airplane in flight and the accident sequence. Most witnesses observed the airplane flying low, followed by a sudden pitch down or loss of airplane control. Three witnesses reported that the engine continued to run normally until impact, while two witnesses reported that the engine was "sputtering" and/or "backfiring." Another witness reported the engine at "low power not idle."

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 70, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. He reported a total flight experience of 2,710 hours, including 35 hours during the last six months, on his limited third class medical certificate application, dated May 12, 2014. The medical certificate included a restriction to wear corrective lenses.

The pilot's most recent logbook was provided to the investigation team by family members. The first entry was recorded on July 1, 2011, at a total forwarded flight time of 2,485.5 hours. The last logged entry was on June 25, 2014, in a Piper PA-31. His total logged flight time was 2,730.7 hours, including 1,454.1 single engine and 395.0 hours in tail wheel airplanes.

The pilot's logged flight time in the accident airplane, since July 1, 2011, was 6.1 hours, encompassing 6 flights. The last logged flight in the accident airplane was on May 21, 2013.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was Steen Skybolt, built by Charles Allen in 1975. The experimental, amateur-built, bi-wing, tail wheel landing gear airplane was powered by a Lycoming O-360-A1D engine rated at 180 horsepower at 2,700 rpm. It was fitted with a Hartzell HC-C2YK-1A, two-bladed, constant speed propeller.

An examination of available maintenance records revealed that a conditional inspection was performed on the airframe and engine on April 8, 2014. The airframe total time at the conditional inspection was 860.75 hours. According to Federal Aviation Administration records, the accident pilot acquired the airplane from the previous owner, who was also the airplane builder, in October, 1999.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 1735 surface weather observation for Carrollton, Georgia (CTJ), located about 9 miles west-northwest of the accident site, included sky clear, wind from 180 degrees at 4 knots, visibility 10 statute miles or greater, temperature 90 degrees F, dew point 68 degrees F, and altimeter setting 30.08 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The wreckage was located in a heavily wooded area. The airplane initially impacted a white oak tree, about 60 feet above the ground. The upper, right section of the wing remained lodged in the tree. The remainder of the wreckage impacted the ground about 46 feet north-northeast of the impacted tree. The entire wreckage path was about 105 feet in length, oriented on a heading of 030 degrees magnetic. Numerous tree limbs, up to 5 inches in diameter, with smooth, angular cuts were located within the wreckage debris field. A post-crash fire consumed a majority of the main wreckage. All components and fragments of the wreckage that were outside of the ground fire area were free of soot or evidence of fire.

All major airframe structural and flight control components were accounted for within the wreckage debris field. Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit control stick to the ailerons. All fractures in the aileron control rods were consistent with overload. Elevator and rudder control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit controls to the control stick and the rudder pedals. One of two welded steel brackets connecting the elevator trim tab to the control cables was broken and showed indications of fire and heat damage. The assembly was forwarded to the NTSB Materials Laboratory in Washington, DC for examination.

The propeller assembly broke free at the engine crankshaft, just aft of the propeller flange, and was located about 50 feet north-northeast of the engine. The propeller was the furthest component found along the wreckage path. The fracture to the crankshaft showed signatures consistent with overload. The engine remained attached to the airframe by control cables.

Two sets of four-point seat belt buckles were located within the cockpit area. The buckles remained fastened and the webbing was consumed by the post-crash fire.

The metal fuel tank was ruptured and burned and was located within the area of the fuselage. The fuel cap was secure. The fuel line from the tank to the engine was consumed by the post-crash fire.

The cockpit instruments were burned in the post-crash fire and no useful information was obtained from them. The cockpit-mounted engine controls were found in the retarded (aft) positions.

After the wreckage was recovered from the accident site, the engine was examined at a wreckage storage facility in Griffin, Georgia. The engine was exposed to the post-crash fire and was burned or melted in several areas. The spark plugs were removed and examined. The electrode wear and deposits were normal when compared to a Champion inspection chart. The magneto cases were partially melted and the units could not be tested. The leads were partially burned away. The heat and fire-damaged carburetor was removed and disassembled. The composite floats were charred but in place. The bowl was clean and dry and no residual fuel found.

The cylinders were removed and engine was disassembled. Other than post-crash fire and heat damage, no anomalies were noted with the cylinders, valves, pushrods, and pistons; power train continuity was established and all components indicated normal operating signatures. The engine case, crankshaft, camshaft and bearings were normal in appearance, except for heat distress from the post-crash fire. The examination of the engine did not reveal any evidence of a pre-existing anomaly or malfunction.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

A postmortem examination of the pilot was performed at the offices of Georgia Bureau of
Investigation, Division of Forensic Sciences, Decatur, Georgia on July 14, 2014. The autopsy report noted the cause of death as "Multiple blunt impact injuries" and the manner of death was "Accident."

Forensic toxicology testing was performed on specimens of the pilot by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory (CAMI), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The CAMI toxicology report indicated no carbon monoxide testing was performed due to a lack of suitable specimens. Testing for cyanide was not performed. No ethanol was found in the urine. Amlodipine was detected in the urine, but not in the blood. The pilot reported that he was taking amlodipine on his latest FAA medical certificate application. According to the FAA Aerospace Medical Research Forensic Toxicology website, Amlodipine is a calcium channel blocker heart medication used in the treatment of hypertension. Salicylate (aspirin) was detected in the urine.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The elevator trim tab and connecting hardware were sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory for examination. The fracture surface was initially examined as-received and was subsequently cleaned with a solution of alconox and water using a soft-bristle brush. A portion of the fracture surface at the aft end of the fracture had mostly intergranular fracture features with some transgranular facets. The remainder of the fracture surface appeared oxidized with no discernible fracture features. Next, the fracture surface was deoxidized by immersion in Evapo-Rust1 for 6 hours. The deoxidized fracture surface was then examined using a scanning electron microscope. The fracture surface outside of the intergranular region was mostly obscured by oxidation that remained on the surface. However, a few isolated areas of fracture features were observed. The fracture features in those areas showed dimple fracture features consistent with ductile overstress fracture.

http://registry.faa.gov/N849CA

NTSB Identification: ERA14FA339 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 13, 2014 in Carrollton, GA
Aircraft: ALLEN STEEN SKYBOLT, registration: N849CA
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 13, 2014, about 1725 eastern daylight time, an Allen Steen Skybolt, N849CA, was destroyed following a collision with trees and terrain near Carrollton, Georgia. The commercial pilot and one passenger were fatally injured. The experimental, amateur-built airplane was registered to a corporation and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated from West Georgia Regional Airport, Carrollton, Georgia, about 1640.

Reportedly, the pilot was on a local area pleasure flight with his grandson. Several witnesses observed the airplane in flight and the accident sequence. Most witnesses observed the airplane flying low, followed by a sudden pitch down or loss of airplane control. Three witnesses reported that the engine continued to run normally until impact, while two witnesses reported that the engine was "sputtering" and/or "backfiring."

The airplane initially impacted a white oak tree, about 60 feet above the ground. The upper, right section of the wing remained lodged in the tree. The remainder of the wreckage impacted the ground about 46 feet north-northeast of the impacted tree. The entire wreckage path was about 105 feet in length, oriented on a heading of 020 degrees magnetic. A post-crash fire consumed a majority of the main wreckage. All components and fragments of the wreckage that were outside of the ground fire area were free of soot or evidence of fire.

An examination of available maintenance records revealed that a conditional inspection was performed on the airframe and engine on April 8, 2014. The airframe total time at the conditional inspection was 860.75 hours. According to Federal Aviation Administration records, the accident pilot acquired the airplane from the previous owner, who was also the airplane builder, in October, 1999.


Flight Standards District Office: FAA Atlanta FSDO-11 




Jeffrey Brian Haney, Jr.


Jeffrey Brian Haney, Jr.

November 10, 2004 - July 13, 2014

Obituary for Jeffrey Brian Haney, Jr. Master Jeffrey Brian Haney, Jr., age 9, of Carrollton, Georgia passed away Sunday, July 13, 2014. He was born November 10, 2004 in Carrollton, Georgia, the son of Mr. Jeffrey Brian Haney, Sr. and Mrs. Lindy Morris Haney. He would be entering the fourth grade at Roopville Elementary this fall. 


From a young age, Jeffrey shared his father’s love of all things “sports and aviation-related.” At the age of four, he started playing football, baseball and basketball with his father as his coach. An avid Auburn football fan, he enjoyed attending Auburn Football games and dreamed of playing football at Auburn University. Jeffrey also considered himself a proud Central Lion, playing on the Central Lions team for the Carroll County Recreation Department, and having recently attended the Central High School Football Camp. He also loved flying regularly with his father and grandfather. On his eighth birthday his one wish was to fly over Jordan-Hare Stadium at Auburn University. 

Jeffrey loved to be outside – playing with his dogs, go-carting, “mudding” and practicing his athletic skills. But, he also loved PlayStation and his video games, always looking for a chance to play with his father, his sisters, Elizabeth and Allison, brother, Jackson and his friends, whoever was willing to take up the challenge. 

Jeffrey shared with the rest of his family a passion for the magic of Disney. The family traveled regularly to Disney World and Jeffrey especially enjoyed staying at Fort Wilderness, where he could ride bikes and swim after visiting the theme parks. He loved the “late night extended hours,” riding rides until they kicked him out. 

Above all, he loved meeting new people, and by all accounts, “never met a stranger.” Jeffrey’s sunny disposition, pleasant outlook and general happy nature made him an absolute pleasure to be around. Jeffrey had an open heart and loved everyone. An affectionate child, he gave his hugs freely and always came back for one more. Jeffrey was a member of Midway Baptist Church; and, as the child of the Preschool Director, Jeffrey was very active in the children’s ministry. He loved the children’s church services and his Sunday School class.

He is survived by his loving parents, Jeff and Lindy Morris Haney of Carrollton; two sisters, Elizabeth Victoria Haney and Allison Leigh Haney; one brother, Jackson Robert Haney; maternal grandparents, Bob and Renee Moon Morris of Dallas, Georgia, paternal grandmother, Margaret Brannon Haney of Carrollton; maternal great-grandmother, Wilma Moon of Marietta, several aunts and uncles, a number of cousins, great aunts, and great-uncles. He was preceded in death by his paternal grandfather, Richard Michael Haney, Sr.


The family will receive friends at Midway Macedonia Baptist Church on Thursday, July 17, 2014 from 4:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. Funeral Services will be conducted Friday, July 18, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. at Midway Macedonia Baptist Church with Rev. Todd Wright and Rev. Chad Clifton officiating. Interment will follow at West Georgia Memorial Park in Carrollton. He will be buried next to his paternal grandfather. Serving as pallbearers will be his close friends, teammates and their dads, Rev. Chad Clifton, Jackson Clifton, Ben Briscoe, Ethan Summerville, Lopez Nunn, Aiden Nunn, Phil Jiles, and Grant Jiles.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions in memory of Jeffrey may be made to The Jeffrey B. Haney, Jr. Memorial Fund (c/o Community Foundation of West Georgia, 807 South Park Street, Carrollton, Georgia 30117) or https://www.cfwg.net/make-a-donation. Funds contributed will be used for the benefit of various children’s charitable organizations with an emphasis on youth athletics and children’s healthcare. 

Messages of condolence to the family may be sent at www.jones-wynn.com. Jones-Wynn Funeral Home and Cremation Service of Villa Rica is in charge of arrangements. 770-459-3694

http://www.jones-wynn.com/Life Tributes Memorial Video

http://www.jones-wynn.com


Richard Michael Haney, Sr.



Richard Michael Haney, Sr.
May 25, 1944 July 13, 2014

Life Legacy 

Richard Michael Haney, Sr., 70, died July 13, 2014 in a plane crash in Carrollton, Georgia. He was born May 25, 1944 in Atlanta, Georgia, the son of the late John Hall Haney and Willie Mae LeCroy Haney. He was a graduate of East Coweta High School and the University of Georgia, and had done Doctoral work at Georgia State University. Richard moved to Carrollton in October, 1967, as an Instructor of Management at then West Georgia College. He subsequently built a mobile home park behind the college for students. In 1969, he bought the local Ford dealership and for the next 30 years was the dealer for Richard Haney Ford. Also, during this time he developed Oak Mountain Golf Club and was presently developing Stonecrest Subdivision.

Richard was an Eagle Scout and for many years led a local troop and was the Advancement Chairman for the local district. He was a member of the Rotary Club and on the board of The Salvation Army. Richard was a member of the local EAA chapter and flew Young Eagles on many occasions. He was a member of Tabernacle Baptist Church for 47 years and was a deacon, had taught Sunday School and been in the Adult Choir for many years.

Survivors include his wife of 47 years, Margaret Brannon Haney, to whom he was married in October, 1967; children, Richard Michael Haney, Jr. and his wife, Edie, of Carrollton, Laura Haney Joswick of Carrollton, Deanna Haney Whittaker and her husband Will, of Buford, Georgia, Lisa Haney Joswick of Carrollton, and Jeffrey Brian Haney and his wife, Lindy, of Carrollton. Also surviving are grandchildren Alec Lee, Kyle Haney, Rachel Rooks, Rebekah Rooks, Abigail Joswick, Jon Thomas Whittaker, Tyler Whittaker, Andrew Whittaker, Elise Joswick, Elizabeth Haney, Allison Haney, and Jackson Haney. Also surviving are his brother, Ronald Haney, and his wife Valerie of Anchorage, Alaska and three nieces and their husbands and children.

Richard was preceded in death by one grandson, Jeffrey Haney.

Funeral services will be held at Tabernacle Baptist Church Saturday, July 19, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. with Dr. Ron Stone officiating. Music will be by Rev. Jack Gantt, Rev. Alan Schantz and Rev. Will Whittaker.

The family will receive friends Friday, July 18,2014 from 4:00 until 7:00 p.m. at Tabernacle Baptist Church, 150 Tabernacle Drive Carrollton, Georgia 30117.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Tabernacle Baptist Church. 


http://www.martin-hightower.com



CARROLL COUNTY, Ga. — Federal investigators are trying to determine why an aircraft crashed in a densely wooded part of Carroll County on Sunday afternoon and killed the pilot and his grandson. 

Family members confirmed the pilot was 70-year-old Richard Haney, a retired owner of a large car dealership in Carrollton.  They also said Haney had his grandson with him on the plane, 9-year -old Jeffrey Haney.

"Richard was a wonderful family man, a businessman and an avid aviationist," said family spokesperson Weyman Rooks.  "He passed that love of flying onto his children and grandchildren."

The National Transportation Safety Board removed most of the wreckage of the Steen Skybolt open cockpit bi-plane Monday afternoon and hauled to a hangar in Griffin so investigators can take a closer look at it.

Witness Eddie Williams said he was outside his home Sunday afternoon when he saw Haney's plane fly barely 100 yards overhead.  Williams said he immediately knew something was wrong.

"I heard it spitting and sputtering," said Williams.  "I heard the engine cut off, and when the engine cut off, it kind of glided down, and I heard somebody hollering, then I watched the plane go down and crash."

Another witness said he spotted the plan in a low-altitude nose-first spiral shortly before the crash.

Williams said he immediately dialed 911 and ran into the woods to try and help, but there wasn't much left of the plane when he arrived.

NTSB spokesperson Ralph Hicks said it appears the plane struck a tree before crashing to the ground.

"The first impact point appeared to be a tall white oak," said Hicks.  "The airplane struck the tree about 60 feet up, and about a quarter of the wing remained lodged in the tree."

Hicks characterized Haney as an experienced pilot with over 2700 hours of flight time.


Source:   http://www.wsbtv.com


CARROLL COUNTY, Ga. - Authorities have released the names of the two people killed in the crash of a small experimental aircraft Sunday in Carroll County.

Richard Haney and his grandson Jeffrey Haney, 9, were killed in the crash.

FOX 5 has learned that the victims were members of a prominent family from the Carroll County area.

The crash happened shortly before 5 p.m. Sunday in a rural area near the Oak Mountain Academy.

The aircraft caught fire after it crashed in a wooded area, according to authorities. The fire made search efforts difficult, and it took several hours for searchers to locate the second victim of the crash.

Investigators describe the experimental aircraft as a two-seat Steen Skybolt.

The National Transportation Safety Board will lead the investigation into the crash.

Source:   http://www.myfoxatlanta.com

CARROLL COUNTY -- Authorities say two people died after a plane crashed in Carrollton on Sunday.

The preliminary investigation shows the aircraft crashed in a wooded area and was destroyed by fire.

The plane's pilot, Richard Haney, 70, and his 9-year-old grandson Jeffery, were killed in the crash, a family spokesperson said.

The plane took off from West Georgia Regional Airport Sunday afternoon. The crash took place four or five miles from the airport.

Ralph Hicks, NTSB Senior Air Safety Investigator, said that there was no evidence of an in-flight fire.

Haney was an experienced pilot, Hicks said. Weather is not thought to be a factor in the crash, Hicks said.  The aircraft was a Steen Skybolt.  The crash remains under investigation.

Source:  http://www.11alive.com


 

Richard and Jeffrey Haney



Richard Haney and his grandson Jeffrey were killed in a crash.



  Jeffrey Haney, 9, was killed in the Carroll Co. plane crash



Richard Haney was killed in crash, courtesy of The Times-Georgian






 Richard Haney, 70, courtesy of The Times-Georgian



 Jeffrey Haney




Richard Haney, 70, and his grandson, 9-year-old Jeffery Haney, were killed with their small plane crashed Sunday.

Haney, of Carrollton, had been on the Rome-based River City Bank board of directors since 2009, according to the bank's website. He was also president of the Haney Family Partnership and president and CEO of Aviation Pursuits, Inc.

Federal investigators say they're planning to probe several components of the plane.   National Transportation Safety Board investigator Ralph Hicks said during a press conference that the wreckage of the small, amateur-built plane found in a wooded area near Carrolton Sunday evening spanned an area that was about 100 feet long and 50 feet wide.

Hicks says the investigation will continue Tuesday with a review of the plane's engine and flight controls. Hicks says the plane first hit a tree and the engine and propeller came off after impact. Carroll County Coroner Samuel Eady says authorities are using dental records to identify the two passengers.

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