Friday, May 27, 2022

Cessna 172F Skyhawk, N5532R: Fatal accident occurred May 25, 2022 near Show Low Regional Airport (KSOW), Navajo County, Arizona

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board travelled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas 

Location: Show Low, Arizona
Accident Number: WPR22FA188
Date and Time: May 25, 2022, 17:50 Local
Registration: N5532R
Aircraft: Cessna 172F
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On May 25, 2022, about 1750 mountain standard time, a Cessna C-172F airplane, N5532P, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Show Low, Arizona. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was as operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

Witnesses at Show Low Regional Airport (SOW) observed the airplane attempt a takeoff from runway 25. They stated the airplane became airborne two or three times but did not climb out of ground effect. The airplane touched down as it approached the end of the runway and was observed as “getting squirrely” and sliding sideways. The pilot then taxied back to the approach end of runway 25 and performed a run-up before attempting a second takeoff. Two of the witnesses stated the engine was “sputtering” and did not sound right on the first takeoff and when it taxied back to the run-up area. The pilot then attempted a second takeoff. A pilot witness said the pilot “milked it off the runway, set it back down, and milked it off the runway again.” The airplane remained at a low altitude and began a left turn towards downwind. When the airplane reached a downwind heading, the airplane sank out of sight behind terrain. The pilot witness said the engine “sounded rich, like it was bogged down,” during the second takeoff. The airplane impacted a stream in an open field about 1 mile southwest of the departure end of runway 25. The airplane was substantially damaged.

A postaccident examination of the airplane’s engine revealed that the No. 4 cylinder exhaust valve was seized, in the open position. The engine and No. 4 cylinder were retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N5532R
Model/Series: 172F
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSOW, 6411 ft msl 
Observation Time: 17:55 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C /-10°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / 17 knots, 360°
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Show Low, AZ 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 34.247904,-110.02313 (est)

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances just after departure.  

Date: 25-MAY-22
Time: 00:50:00Z
Regis#: N5532R
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Total Fatal: 2 fatal 
Flight Crew: 1 fatal 
Pax: 1 fatal 
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
City: SHOW LOW
State: ARIZONA

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.


Anthony Joseph Greco


 Derek Michael Deutscher 




SHOW LOW, Arizona — "He loved work, he loved people. He loved his newfound hobby of flying,” says Kyle Walburn. “It's just a shame.”

Walburn now talks in the past tense about his friend and coworker, Anthony Greco. The 53-year-old recently moved with his wife to Maricopa from Chicago’s suburbs. Walburn will never forget the phone call he got about his friend.

"I was shocked. You definitely don't expect something like that. Especially somebody you know so well,” Walburn says.

Greco and his passenger, Derek Deutscher were killed in a small plane crash near Show Low Lake. According to the Navajo County Sheriff’s Office, the crash happened around 6 p.m. in a meadow May 26.

Greco was a father of four boys who had a passion for life.

"If anybody had a love for life it was him. He just loved anything to do with outdoors people and having fun,” says Walburn.

"He loved the freedom that flying provided. You know, in Arizona, he told me he'd hop in the plane and bring Becky and you know, go out somewhere for breakfast.”

Greco’s wife, Becky, tells ABC15 he was larger than life. Becky says he was by her side during her cancer battle.

For Walburn, he will miss Anthony’s voice on the phone.

Officials not releasing details on what caused the crash; however it is being investigated by the NTSB and Show Low Police.

11 comments:

  1. It has been reported that the 2nd occupant has succumbed to injuries sustained during this accident.
    Condolences to the families.

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    Replies
    1. I don’t know anything about planes or flying, but I do know that Derek has been a great friend for the last 15 years. We met in So Cal when he worked for Codon and Johnson. We spent many hours in the San Bernardino mountains quail hunting. RIP Derek, you will be sorely missed my friend. I will fill a limit for you this year.
      Bob

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  2. Another old underpowered 172 like in Florida last month, heard there were 3 on board. Not a good airport to stop and gas up. High elevation. From Wisconsin, may not cautioned high density Alt. A Cutlass RG with 2 people crashed and killed two some years ago from there. Could not climb..

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  3. And was at the high temp of the day, late afternoon.

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  4. It's easy to underestimate the effects of high DA if you're not familiar with it. I've been fortunate to be able to spend about 3 years flying in and around the Four Corners area. A lot of that cross country in a C172 and a good bit of it dual with an instructor (getting checkouts). Field elevations in the "5,000's" and DA's as high as 9,000+' are pretty common this time of year. The wind can be sporty at times. It's best to choose not to fly when the conditions are that bad and that significantly reduces the number of hours a day for flying. Once up to altitude it's not so bad. You just have to be on your toes taking off and landing and be ready to "abort if not off by".

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  5. Sadly, they had two heavy people and a full load of fuel. Tried to take off once; got a few feet in the air and set it back down. Taxied back to try it again. This time got a little higher but were not climbing, so tried to turn back to the runway. You see the results. I was there the morning after this happened and got this info from the airport manager who witnessed the tragedy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. illustrates ur comment of attempts. Taxi 33:58Z, 48:56Z / 66kts, liftoff 49:07Z / 61kts. https://globe.adsbexchange.com/?icao=a70d3e&lat=34.259&lon=-110.029&zoom=14.7&showTrace=2022-05-26&trackLabels

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    2. METARs around 00:50Z on UTC actual day 26:
      KSOW 260055Z AUTO 33006G15KT 10SM CLR 25/M10 A3013
      KSOW 260035Z AUTO 35009KT 10SM CLR 25/M10 A3013

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  6. Flightaware 'ACTIVITY LOG' lists frequent recent local flights out and about from Maricopa, AZ @ 1307.0 feet. First time to Slow Low @ 6415.5 feet.

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  7. They had engine problems - reported hard starting, then after managing to take off, strange engine noises. One of the exhaust valves was damaged.

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  8. NTSB Prelim Report: file:///C:/Users/littl/Downloads/Report_WPR22FA188_105133_6_7_2022%207_26_53%20PM.pdf

    On May 25, 2022, about 1750 mountain standard time, a Cessna C-172F airplane, N5532P, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Show Low, Arizona. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was as operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

    Witnesses at Show Low Regional Airport (SOW) observed the airplane attempt a takeoff from runway 25. They stated the airplane became airborne two or three times but did not climb out of ground effect. The airplane touched down as it approached the end of the runway and was observed as “getting squirrely” and sliding sideways. The pilot then taxied back to the approach end of runway 25 and performed a run-up before attempting a second takeoff. Two of the witnesses stated the engine was “sputtering” and did not sound right on the first takeoff and when it taxied back to the run-up area. The pilot then attempted a second takeoff. A pilot witness said the pilot “milked it off the runway, set it back down, and milked it off the runway again.” The airplane remained at a low altitude and began a left turn towards downwind.

    When the airplane reached a downwind heading, the airplane sank out of sight behind terrain. The pilot witness said the engine “sounded rich, like it was bogged down,” during the second takeoff. The airplane impacted a stream in an open field about 1 mile southwest of the departure end of runway 25. The airplane was substantially damaged.

    A postaccident examination of the airplane’s engine revealed that the No. 4 cylinder exhaust valve was seized, in the open position. The engine and No. 4 cylinder were retained for further examination.

    Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C /-10°C
    Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / 17 knots, 360°
    Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg

    ReplyDelete