Monday, May 30, 2022

EDI Express Turbine Express 2000 RG, N44508: Fatal accident occurred May 30, 2022 and Accident occurred May 29, 2015

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado 
Transportation Safety Board of Canada


Location: Cheyenne, Wyoming
Accident Number: CEN22FA216
Date and Time: May 30, 2022, 07:48 Local 
Registration: N44508
Aircraft: Express 2000RG 
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On May 30, 2022, about 0748 mountain daylight time, an Express 2000RG airplane, N44508, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Cheyenne, Wyoming. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight.

According to preliminary information obtained by investigators, the airplane departed the Cheyenne Regional Airport/Jerry Olson Field (CYS) from runway 27, about 0744, with the intention of flying to Texas. Shortly after takeoff, the pilot declared an emergency with air traffic control (ATC) tower personnel and informed them that he had “an engine failure” and was about 4 miles south of the airport. He later reported that he would not be able to land at the airport and intended to land in a field. He also stated that he was “on fire” and asked ATC to send fire rescue. Video cameras from a local business captured a portion of the accident sequence which showed the airplane descending, near vertical, with a right roll.

The airplane collided with a storage facility. The initial impact point was a divot in the concrete. The wreckage path continued about 15 ft into a storage locker. A post crash fire ensued which consumed a majority of the airplane.

After on-scene documentation, the airplane was moved to a secure facility for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Express 
Registration: N44508
Model/Series: 2000RG 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFEW, 6160 ft msl
Observation Time: 07:58 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 10°C /0°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 12000 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 15 knots / 22 knots, 300°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.59 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Cheyenne, WY (CYS)
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 41.132417,-104.79194

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances into a storage unit.

Date: 30-MAY-22
Time: 13:49:00Z
Regis#: N44508
Aircraft Make: EXPRESS AIRCRAFT
Aircraft Model: 2000 RG
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Total Fatal: 1
Flight Crew: 1 fatal
Pax: 0 
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: INITIAL CLIMB (ICL)
Operation: 91
City: CHEYENNE
State: WYOMING

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290. 



Jason Aguilera (left), Senior Air Safety Investigator
National Transportation Safety Board 




CHEYENNE, Wyoming - Three (3) minutes. That is the amount of time between take-off, and a deadly crash.

According to flight records, the pilot took off from Cheyenne Regional Airport at 7:44AM on Memorial Day. The flight came to an end three minutes later at 7:47AM when the plane crashed into the Cheyenne Storage facilities.

Jason Aguilera, a Senior Air Safety Investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board was on the scene today.

“What we’re looking at right now is just kind of how it actually hit the storage facility behind us, the angle it went in, and then the damage that was resulted as a part of that. So we did a documentation yesterday, we’re finishing up today. And the wreckage is being removed to a secure facility where we’ll do follow up work on the engine and propeller.” he said when asked what the NTSB was doing at the site.

The pilot was flying what authorities called an experimental aircraft. These planes are not manufactured by major corporations, but instead by amateur. The planes are still certified by the FAA.

Investigators will be looking into the pilot, the plane, weather and more to try to determine a cause for the crash.

A preliminary report is expected to be released 15 days after the accident happened.

Investigations involving fatalities can take 12-24 months to complete.




CHEYENNE, Wyoming –  An EDI Express Turbine Express 2000 RG experimentally amateur built airplane crashed at around 8 a.m. Monday into a storage unit on Crook Avenue, near Nationway.

The crash appeared to have caused a relatively small blaze that was extinguished within about half an hour. Besides the pilot, there were no other fatalities.

The pilot of the aircraft was its sole occupant. The person, who authorities did not identify by name, has died, according to an update the Cheyenne Police Department distributed by email at around 1 p.m.

The individual was an adult male, CPD spokesperson Alex Farkas said by phone Monday afternoon. "No further injuries have been reported," according to the police department's news release.

The airplane had taken off from Cheyenne Regional Airport and was headed to Texas, according to National Transportation Safety Board spokesperson Jennifer Gabris. "An NTSB investigator arrived on scene this afternoon," Gabris wrote in an email to the Wyoming Tribune Eagle.

The county coroner's office has received the body of the pilot, Coroner Rebecca Reid said in a brief phone interview. She said that it might take a few days to get a positive identification. Once that occurs, the coroner's office will notify that individual's family, she told the WTE.

First responders from multiple agencies had been on the scene, authorities had said earlier Monday. By early afternoon, CPD personnel had remained there only to direct traffic, Farkas said. "We are no longer documenting what’s happening at the scene. It's been turned over" to federal authorities, she said by phone.

Cheyenne Fire Rescue had worked to extinguish the blaze at Cheyenne Storage, 616 Crook Ave. At around the time of the crash, CFR had sent six fire engines to the location, and they were able to contain the fire at around 8:30 a.m., authorities said.

Some 30 firefighters went to the location "during the initial incident, but currently two (investigative and commander) fire personnel are here," Andrew Dykshorn, CFR's division chief of operations, wrote in an email to the WTE at around 2:30 p.m. "There is one storage unit that was involved in the incident."

Initially at the time of the crash-landing, "there was a full police response to the crash, everyone who was on shift responded (10-12 officers) for traffic control and investigation," police spokeswoman Farkas wrote to the WTE. "Some officers from the previous shift remained on the clock to cover other calls for service in town."

Cheyenne Storage

When the plane crashed, Cheyenne Storage was closed to customers, a co-owner said by phone Monday afternoon; she would not provide her name.

As she spoke with the WTE, she said that another co-owner was speaking with a representative of the NTSB. At the time of the crash, the co-owner was at the business, although he did not see the incident, the fellow co-owner recounted.

"No one here was hurt, just the pilot," the business owner said by phone. She said that the storage facility's office, from where she was speaking, was not damaged.

Part of Nationway remained closed. "They were starting to clear things up" in the early afternoon, Farkas said. "Definitely sometime today, the road should be open again; hoping (for) this evening." Residents were being asked to remain away from the area so as not to interfere with first responders.

As the CPD's early-afternoon news release said, "the scene is still active and has now been turned over to the National [Transportation] Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration."

Federal investigation

Both the FAA and the NTSB "will investigate" what happened, an FAA spokesperson wrote in an email to the WTE.

"The NTSB will be in charge of the investigation and provide additional updates," the FAA spokesperson added in his email. The NTSB has a regional office in Denver, according to the agency's website. 

In approximately 15 business days, the NTSB will release a preliminary report on the crash, spokesperson Gabris said by phone.

The initial report will contain all of the factual information that is known about the incident, Gabris said. A final report, with an analysis and suggesting a probable cause of the crash, would typically be released within a year or two, the spokeswoman estimated.

Part of the NTSB's "investigation will be to request radar data, weather information, maintenance records and the pilot’s medical records. NTSB investigators will look at the human, machine and environment as the outline of the investigation," Gabris wrote in her later email.

In addition to CFR, CPD and the Laramie County coroner's office, Wyoming Air National Guard Fire, the Cheyenne-Laramie County Emergency Management Agency and the Laramie County Fire Authority were described as being among "the partnering agencies assisting with the initial investigation."

Clarification: An earlier online version of this report said that the NTSB could release its initial report around June 15. Given the agency expects to issue the document in about 15 business, not calendar, days, the actual date of release would be later in June. This reference has been removed from an updated version of this article.




CHEYENNE, Wyoming — The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration have taken over the scene of a plane crash that killed one person this morning, officials said.

The Cheyenne Police Department and Cheyenne Fire Rescue responded at around 8 a.m. today to 616 Crook Ave., where an experimental aircraft crashed into Cheyenne Storage, the department said in a news release.

According to the Experimental Aircraft Association, amateur-built aircraft built by individuals and licensed by the FAA receive the experimental designation.

An investigation by multiple agencies determined the pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries. No other injuries have been reported, police said.

Authorities have not released the identity of the pilot.

The storage facility caught fire as a result of the crash, and the fire department deployed six engines to fight it. The fire was contained at about 8:30 a.m.

The scene remains active, police said. It has been turned over to the NTSB and FAA.

Partnering agencies in the initial investigation included Cheyenne Fire Rescue, Cheyenne Police Department, Wyoming Air National Guard Fire, American Medical Response, Cheyenne/Laramie County Emergency Management Agency, Laramie County Coroner and Laramie County Fire Authority, police said.





UPDATE 12:45 p.m.: The pilot of an experimental aircraft that crashed in East Cheyenne on Monday sustained fatal injuries in the accident, according to a joint news release from the Cheyenne Police Department and Cheyenne Fire Rescue.

But the release does not name the pilot, adding that the crash will be investigated by the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

According to the release, the crash was reported around 8 a.m. at Cheyenne Storage at 616 Crook Avenue. Cheyenne Police and Cheyenne Fire Rescue responded to the scene, and firefighters battled a blaze that had been ignited at the storage facility by the crash. Six fire engines were deployed, and the fire was contained by 8:30 a.m.

The release says

"Cheyenne Fire Rescue, Cheyenne Police Department, Wyoming Air National Guard Fire, American Medical Response, Cheyenne/Laramie County Emergency Management Agency, Laramie County Coroner, Laramie County Fire Authority are the partnering agencies assisting with the initial investigation."

Other than the pilot, no injuries have been reported in connection with the crash.

Original Post: Cheyenne Police say an experimental aircraft has crashed in the area of Cheyenne Storage at 616 Crook Avenue

Details are still sketchy at this hour, but the aircraft was believed to have one person aboard. At the last report, the eastbound lane of Nationway was closed, and people were being asked to avoid the area.

We'll report more information as it becomes available.





CHEYENNE, Wyoming — The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration have taken over the scene of a plane crash that killed one person this morning, officials said.

The Cheyenne Police Department and Cheyenne Fire Rescue responded at around 8 a.m. today to 616 Crook Ave., where an experimental aircraft crashed into Cheyenne Storage, the department said in a news release.

According to the Experimental Aircraft Association, amateur-built aircraft built by individuals and licensed by the FAA receive the experimental designation.

An investigation by multiple agencies determined the pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries. No other injuries have been reported, police said.

Authorities have not released the identity of the pilot.

The storage facility caught fire as a result of the crash, and the fire department deployed six engines to fight it. The fire was contained at about 8:30 a.m.

The scene remains active, police said. It has been turned over to the NTSB and FAA.

Partnering agencies in the initial investigation included Cheyenne Fire Rescue, Cheyenne Police Department, Wyoming Air National Guard Fire, American Medical Response, Cheyenne/Laramie County Emergency Management Agency, Laramie County Coroner and Laramie County Fire Authority, police said.





CHEYENNE, Wyoming — A pilot died after an experimental aircraft crashed in east Cheyenne, Wyoming, on Monday morning.

Around 8 a.m. Monday, the Cheyenne Police Department and Cheyenne Fire Rescue responded to a report of an aircraft crash at Cheyenne Storage, located at 616 Crook Avenue, about 9 miles north of the Colorado-Wyoming border.

When authorities arrived, they found an experimental aircraft had crashed and the pilot — the only person in the aircraft — had died at the scene, police said.

The crash started a fire at the storage facility, which firefighters were able to contain by 8:30 a.m.

The scene remained active as of 1 p.m. The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.

In addition to the Cheyenne police and fire departments, the Wyoming Air National Guard Fire, American Medical Response, Cheyenne/Laramie County Emergency Management Agency, Laramie County Coroner, and Laramie County Fire Authority also helped with the initial investigation.

No other details were available as of 1:45 p.m. Monday.





One person died Monday when an experimental plane crashed in Cheyenne, authorities there said. 

The aircraft crashed at Cheyenne Storage, southeast of downtown, at about 8 a.m., according to a joint statement from Cheyenne police and fire. The pilot, the only occupant, died.

No other injuries were reported.

The crash ignited a fire at the storage facility, which crews contained in about a half hour.

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration will investigate.





CHEYENNE, Wyoming (WNE) — A single-engine experimental plane crashed at around 8 a.m. Monday into a storage unit on Crook Avenue, near Nationway.

The crash appeared to have caused a relatively small blaze that was extinguished within about half an hour. Besides the pilot, there were no other fatalities.

The pilot of the aircraft, which federal air authorities described as an Express 2000 RG, was its sole occupant. The person, who authorities did not identify by name, has died, according to an update the Cheyenne Police Department distributed by email at around 1 p.m. Monday.

The individual was an adult male, CPD spokesperson Alex Farkas said by phone Monday afternoon.

“No further injuries have been reported,” according to the police department’s news release.

The airplane had taken off from Cheyenne Regional Airport and was headed to Texas, according to National Transportation Safety Board spokesperson Jennifer Gabris.

Coroner Rebecca Reid said in a brief phone interview that it might take a few days to get a positive identification of the pilot.

Both the FAA and the NTSB will investigate the incident, an FAA spokesperson wrote in an email to the WTE. In approximately 15 business days, the NTSB will release a preliminary report on the crash, Gabris said.

A final report, with an analysis and suggesting a probable cause of the crash, will be released within a year or two, the spokeswoman estimated.











Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Glendale, Arizona 
Accident Number: WPR15LA179
Date and Time: May 29, 2015, 15:42 Local 
Registration: N44508
Aircraft: BURR EXPRESS 2000 RG 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear collapse 
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The private pilot reported that, following a normal landing in the experimental amateur-built airplane, he applied beta thrust to decelerate the airplane and lightly applied the brakes. Suddenly, the left main landing gear collapsed, and the airplane swerved to the left. The airplane departed the runway surface and the left wing impacted a runway sign. Postaccident examination revealed that the left main landing gear actuator heim rod failed where the threads met the rod end; however, the rod was not made available for further examination, and the reason for the landing gear collapse could not be determined.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
A collapse of the left main landing gear for reasons that could not be determined based on the available information.

Findings
Not determined (general) - Unknown/Not determined

Factual Information

On May 29, 2015, about 1542 mountain standard time, a Burr Express 2000 RG, N44508, experienced a landing gear collapse during the landing roll at Glendale Municipal Airport (GEU) in Glendale, Arizona. The private pilot and one passenger were uninjured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the rudder and elevators. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed from GEU at about 1500.

The pilot reported that he landed the airplane onto the runway normally. He applied beta thrust to decelerate the airplane and started to brake lightly. Suddenly, the left main landing gear collapsed and the airplane swerved to the left. The airplane departed the runway surface and the left wing impacted a runway sign. It traversed along the dirt when the right landing gear collapsed and the tail impacted the ground before sliding to a rest.

During a postaccident examination by a Federal Aviation Administration Inspector it was revealed that the left main landing gear actuator heim rod failed where the threads meet the rod end. Given the location of the heim rod, the inspector was unable to view the fracture surface while the component was installed on the airplane. In addition, the inspector noted that the hydraulic line to the gear actuator was ripped.

The National Transportation Safety Board Investigator-in-charge attempted to obtain the heim rod for further examination, however, the pilot had already repaired the airplane and the part was no longer available.

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll Landing gear collapse (Defining event)
Landing-landing roll Runway excursion

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: November 22, 2013
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: February 1, 2008
Flight Time: (Estimated) 739 hours (Total, all aircraft), 40 hours (Total, this make and model), 600 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BURR 
Registration: N44508
Model/Series: EXPRESS 2000 RG NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2008
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental (Special)
Serial Number: 0101RG
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle 
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: May 26, 2015 Annual 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 48 Hrs 
Engines: 1 Turbo prop
Airframe Total Time: 48 Hrs as of last inspection 
Engine Manufacturer: P & W Canada
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-20
Registered Owner:
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: GEU,1071 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 15:45 Local
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 10000 ft AGL
Visibility 20 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  / None
Wind Direction: 210° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.82 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 38°C / -7°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Glendale, AZ (GEU)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Glendale, AZ (GEU)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 15:00 Local 
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Glendale Municipal Airport GEU 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1071 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 19 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 7150 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.522777,-112.290557 (est)

18 comments:

  1. 2008 BURR J G/BURR C EXPRESS 2000 RG
    Fixed wing single engine
    (4 seats / 1 engine)
    attempted return https://flightaware.com/live/flight/N44508/history/20220530/1353Z/KCYS/KCYS

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. METAR:
      KCYS 301353Z 30017G28KT 10SM CLR 09/M01 A2960 RMK AO2 PK WND 30028/1351 SLP969 T00941006

      Delete
  2. priors http://www.kathrynsreport.com/2017/04/burr-express-2000-rg-n44508-accident.html

    ReplyDelete
  3. Reportedly lost engine power after takeoff and crashed while trying to land, comms start at ~13:20

    https://archive.liveatc.net/kcys/KCYS-May-30-2022-1330Z.mp3

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For those without the patience to download an audio file and search around, this sim kid did it for you: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DtXyEBmqJ3M

      Delete
  4. Flight Radar 24 has data points available. Descent starts at 13:46:21.

    https://www.flightradar24.com/data/aircraft/n44508#2c0d2d9b

    ReplyDelete
  5. FAA and NTSB - The unedited/raw video in this KR posting contains some good first-hand witnesses' conversations that may be helpful for your report.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Some interesting discussion from 2017 when it was on the market:
    https://www.beechtalk.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=49&t=141599

    ReplyDelete
  7. The first and only ad for this aircraft was for sale during an unknown date, but it only had 45 airframe hours at the date of this ad. The original builder Burr is listed as the original owner for 12 years from 2006 to 2018 before registration/ownership sale that year.

    It was built with the selection of a used 3000hr PT6 turbine engine which then got a hot section overhaul. The same 45 hours of the total airframe time equal the hot section overhaul engine time:

    https://airplanesusa.com/?planes=turbine-express-2000-rg

    ^^What stands out to me is a big engine and small tail for both vertical and horizontal stabilization. Not a lot of margin for getting sloppy in rudder coordination.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Beechtalk forum for sale discussion date of 2017 is consistent with the photos in the airplanesusa advert showing 2017 as the upload date, for example:

      https://airplanesusa.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/01.jpg

      Delete
    2. This is a experimental 2nd owner accident ? It was involved in a gear collapse incident in 2015 by the builder. 45 hours means this thing sat around maybe the 2015 incident caused a prop strike wasn't reported.

      Delete
  8. PT-6, not known for power loss.

    ReplyDelete
  9. This plane was a one-of-a-kind. I inspected it personally about a month ago or so. The registered owner in the current FAA registration database is an exceptionally accomplished, skilled and knowledgeable pilot and mechanic, if it was the owner who was flying it at the time of the accident. I don’t know if the owner allowed other pilots to fly this extremely high-performance plane, so perhaps it was another pilot who flew it on the accident day, but I would doubt it. So unfortunate.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nice that he let you inspect it, because per the document posted above, he adamantly refused to let the NTSB look at it. Seems a bit more like "anti-authority" and "macho" to name a few hazardous attitudes.

      Delete
    2. Regarding "anti-authority, macho, hazardous attitudes":

      Read the docs again and you might notice that the June 24, 2015 Record of email shows that an FAA inspector did post-crash inspect the aircraft. The much later August 29, 2015 record of telephone conversation states that he wasn't interested in the fracture evaluation. Was he asked at the time of the FAA post-crash inspection to send broken parts in? We don't know.

      Portrayal of the mechanic rated pilot as anti-authority doesn't have much to back it up, and nothing in the reporting supports making that "macho" reference.

      Delete
  10. ATC audio on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DtXyEBmqJ3M Always fly it all the way though the crash he stalled it security camera shows him almost going in vertical. If your going to die at least be under control all the way like that guy in Florida landing on the bridge he saved his 2 friends.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Let's try this again. Mike Smith, let's not jump to conclusions without all of the facts in front of you. You are so incorrect about the circumstances and the trigger-pull kind of decision making makes you not just an ass as a pilot but as a person as well.

      Delete
  11. The pilot told Air Traffic Control that he was going to try to land in a field. His last communication was, “I am on fire … please send rescue.”

    https://cowboystatedaily.com/2022/05/30/security-cameras-capture-fatal-plane-crash-in-cheyenne-on-monday-morning/

    ReplyDelete