Monday, January 24, 2022

Collision with Terrain (Non-CFIT): Cirrus SR20, N42VR; accident occurred January 20, 2022 near Tri-State Steuben County Airport (KANQ), Angola, Indiana









Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

Western Michigan University


Location: Angola, Indiana
Accident Number: CEN22LA107
Date and Time: January 20, 2022, 19:00 Local
Registration: N42VR
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT) 
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Analysis

The cross-country flight was being conducted by a flight instructor and pilot in conjunction with an instrument rating course from a Part 141 flight school. According to the flight instructor, upon reaching the decision altitude, they transitioned to a visual descent to the runway. During the descent, the airplane impacted trees and the flight instructor assumed control of the airplane and continued to the runway for landing. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, right wing, and both horizontal stabilizers.

The pilot stated that after terminating use of the view limiting device and she transitioned to visual references, she continued to glance back at the glideslope indicator, which showed that they were low on the approach. Shortly thereafter, a tree appeared in front of them, about the same time as they felt the impact. She stated that the precision approach path indicator (PAPI) would not turn on and there was not a current Notice to Air Mission (NOTAM) for the outage.

The pilot reported no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s failure to ensure adequate terrain clearance during an approach. Contributing to the accident was the flight instructor’s delayed remedial action when the airplane descended too low after transitioning to a visual descent to the runway.

Findings

Personnel issues Decision making/judgment - Student/instructed pilot
Aircraft Descent/approach/glide path - Not attained/maintained
Personnel issues Delayed action - Instructor/check pilot
Personnel issues Monitoring equip/instruments - Instructor/check pilot

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach-IFR final approach Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT) (Defining event)

Flight instructor Information

Certificate: Commercial; Flight instructor
Age: 23,Female
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane 
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane single-engine; Instrument airplane
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Class 1 With waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: October 4, 2021
Occupational Pilot: Yes 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: September 30, 2021
Flight Time: 335 hours (Total, all aircraft), 260 hours (Total, this make and model), 278 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 45 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student pilot Information

Certificate: Private 
Age: 20, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: November 12, 2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: August 17, 2020
Flight Time: 132 hours (Total, all aircraft), 43 hours (Total, this make and model), 131 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 14 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP
Registration: N42VR
Model/Series: SR20 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2006 
Amateur Built:
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 1673
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle 
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: December 11, 2021 Annual 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 7141 Hrs at time of accident 
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors
ELT: C126 installed, not activated 
Engine Model/Series: IO360-ES27B
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 200 Horsepower
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot school (141)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Night/dark
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGWB,880 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 20 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 18:35 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 178°
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 4500 ft AGL 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 340° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 30.5 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: -7°C / -13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Battle Creek, WI (KBTL)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Angola, IN 
Type of Clearance: VFR flight following
Departure Time: 18:00 Local 
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: TRI-STATE STEUBEN COUNTY ANQ 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 995 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 05 
IFR Approach: RNAV
Runway Length/Width: 4540 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Straight-in

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 41.638739,-85.084952



Location: Angola, Indiana
Accident Number: CEN22LA107
Date and Time: January 20, 2022, 19:00 Local
Registration: N42VR
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP
Registration: N42VR
Model/Series: SR20 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot school (141)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: NightDark
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGWB,880 ft msl
Observation Time: 18:35 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 20 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: -7°C /-13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 340°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 4500 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.5 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Battle Creek, WI (KBTL) 
Destination: Angola, IN

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 41.638739,-85.084952

11 comments:

  1. "The College of Aviation at Western Michigan University offers the only comprehensive aviation program at a public university in Michigan, and with just over 1,100 undergraduate students, is one of the largest aviation programs in the nation. Backed by 80 years of aviation experience and our excellent industry reputation, the college is a powerful force in the future of aviation training."
    Initially, the WMU Flight School was located at a tiny airport in Plainwell, MI, then moved to AZO in 1957 by Lester Milen "Bill" Zinser, who trained us all very well ...

    ReplyDelete
  2. To avoid clipping trees, I believe flight schools should teach a slow but fairly steep approach (more whites than reds on the VASI).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. To avoid clipping trees, I believe flight schools should teach flying higher than the trees.

      I went to Western for aircraft maintenance.

      Delete
    2. What you’re referring to is a papi which shouldn’t matter because you’re not on a visual approach. You’re on an instrument approach with published minimums

      Delete
    3. Don't necessarily agree with teaching higher than normal approaches. If you're suggesting that flying above glide path a little for cushion, then no issues. It does bring in the question of a stabilized approach though. If the student can't fly the glide slope, are they capable of scrubbing the speed to cross the numbers? If not, now they run the risk of porpoiseing or landing long on short runway. A lot comes into play. Fly the numbers and you'll live to fly another day.

      Delete
  3. Steep approach depends on aircraft, runway length, and approach

    ReplyDelete
  4. Pretty sure they should train normal approaches. Clipping trees happens when you don’t fly a normal approach.

    ReplyDelete
  5. From recent Cirrus 20 and 22 landings that ended up with gears collapsing or in a ball of fire off the edge of runway better be teaching very stable approaches..It will come in handy when flying Airbus A321's with 200 passengers in to San Diego and Orange County airports at night/IFR conditions...

    ReplyDelete
  6. I saw photos of the damage to the aircraft with a large portion of the tree embedded in the underside of the plane. Looked to be a piece of dead tree about eight inches in diameter. The photos also showed the perforation of the fuselage and just missed the control cables to what looked like the elevator.

    Student and CFI aboard.

    ReplyDelete

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