Friday, August 28, 2020

Cessna T210N Turbo Centurion, N64EM: Fatal accident occurred August 26, 2020 near Meadow Lake Airport (KFLY), Colorado Springs, El Paso County, Colorado

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
McCauley Propellers; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N64EM


Location: Peyton, CO

Accident Number: CEN20LA365
Date & Time: 08/26/2020, 1137 MDT
Registration: N64EM
Aircraft: Cessna T210
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On August 26, 2020, about 1137 mountain daylight time, a Cessna T210N airplane, N64EM, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Peyton, Colorado. The private pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.


According to initial information, between about 0830 and 0930, the airplane was flown in the airport traffic pattern at the Meadow Lake Airport (FLY), near Colorado Springs, Colorado. About 1011, the pilot flew the airplane about 20 minutes from FLY to the City of Colorado Springs Municipal Airport (COS), near Colorado Springs, Colorado, for service to the airplane's oxygen system. About 1125, the airplane departed COS on a return flight to FLY.


During the return flight, a flight instructor who was providing instruction in a slower airplane in the pattern at FLY stated that he remembered the accident airplane getting in between the airplane he was in and another slower airplane that was in trail for a landing on runway 33. The instructor felt that there was not much separation between the airplanes. The student and instructor turned the airplane from the base leg onto final and thought the accident airplane extended its downwind to make some room between the slower airplanes. After the student and instructor landed their airplane, they heard that the accident airplane had crashed south of the runway. The instructor turned around and saw plumes of black smoke and the student called 911.


The pilot in the slower trailing airplane stated that the accident airplane entered on the downwind between his airplane and the instructor's and student pilot's airplane. He saw that the accident airplane flew an extended downwind leg and overshot the runway while turning final. A crosswind was present relative to runway 33. The accident airplane increased its bank during that turn to final and pitched up. The accident airplane then impacted terrain, a "puff" of white smoke was observed, then a "fire ball", and black smoke. The airplane nosed over following the impact. The pilot said that the accident pilot made all "proper" radio calls without any mention of malfunctions and did not declare an emergency.


A witness near the accident site said that he saw the airplane's wings "wiggle" and thought that the airplane was going to crash. The airplane then nosed down and impacted terrain. The airplane was about 30 to 50 ft up in the air when it nosed down. The airplane dropped "straight" in. There was no fire or smoke from the airplane when it was in the air. The witness did not hear any engine "sounds". The nose landing gear separated on impact, bounced, and it came to rest by a fence line. The airplane slid on the ground from its initial impact point to its resting point and subsequently caught on fire.


The 46-year-old pilot reported that he had accumulated 207 hours of total flight time and 0 hours of flight in last six months before his last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) examination for a third-class medical certificate dated December 2, 2019. The pilot was given a notice of disapproval after his initial attempt at a private pilot examination. According to a flight instructor who subsequently endorsed the accident pilot's private pilot retest, the accident pilot's areas of deficiency were the soft field takeoff and the short field landing. The instructor gave the accident pilot four additional instructional flights totaling 8.1 hours of flight time. The instructor did not recall the specifics of the instruction he gave the pilot. However, the pilot satisfactorily passed the retesting for his private pilot certificate on October 21, 2016.


According to initial information from a mechanic who performed maintenance on the accident airplane, the engine exhibited low cylinder compression readings during an annual inspection and cylinders were replaced. The mechanic subsequently flew the airplane with the pilot to seat the rings.


A fuel service receipt shows the accident airplane was fueled on August 26, 2020, about 0945, with 53.34 gallons of 100 low lead aviation gasoline. The airplane was equipped with two 45-gallon fuel tanks, which had a total capacity of 90 gallons of which 89 gallons was usable.


The airplane impacted terrain about a mile southeast of runway 33 at FLY. FAA inspectors examined and documented the wreckage. The left wing, left elevator, and sections of the fuselage were melted, deformed, and discolored consistent with ground fire. The outboard section of the right wing did not exhibit the same extent of thermal deformation and discoloration as the left wing. The fuel tank selector was found selecting the right tank. The propeller hub remained attached to the engine. The propeller blade that remained attached to the hub exhibited melting, deformation, and discoloration. Two propeller blades separated from the propeller hub and outboard sections of those blades exhibited chordwise abrasion. The flap jack screw extension was consistent with retracted flaps.


The airplane and engine were recovered and have been retained for further examination.


The El Paso County Coroner was asked to conduct an autopsy on the pilot and to take toxicological samples.


Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: Cessna

Registration: N64EM
Model/Series: T210 N
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions

Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFLY, 6874 ft msl
Observation Time: 1135 MDT
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / 16 knots, 360°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.18 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Colorado Springs, CO (COS)
Destination: Peyton, CO (FLY)

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal

Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 38.920278, -104.558056 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Dr. John Odell

EL PASO COUNTY, Colorado — One person died Wednesday, after the small plane they were piloting crashed near Meadow Lake Airport in Falcon, according to the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office (EPCSO).

Deputies say the pilot was identified as 46-year-old John O’Dell.

O’Dell dedicated over a decade as a doctor for Centura Health and Penrose-St. Francis Health Services, many who worked with him are saddened and shocked by this tragedy, according to a spokesperson from Penrose-St. Francis Health Services.

Dr. Brian Erling, CEO of Centura-Penrose-St. Francis Health Services released the following statement Friday evening:

Dr. John Odell was a dedicated and loyal member of our Centura Health and Penrose-St. Francis Health Services communities for 15 years and this loss is deeply felt by every caregiver in our hospitals. Dr. Odell forged genuine and meaningful relationships and connections with so many of his colleagues and patients throughout his career, as he devotedly cared for our communities and neighbors. Our deepest and most heartfelt condolences go out to his family, friends, and loved ones, and all our caregivers who are grieving this painful loss. -DR. BRIAN ERLING

The crash happened just after 11:30 a.m. about a mile south-southeast of the airport, on McCandlish Road.

A witness who called 911 said the aircraft appeared to be attempting to land when it flipped over and came to rest upside down.

“I asked some onlookers if they saw anyone eject from the plane. Then suddenly, the fuel ignited and blew up, and I knew I needed to stand back,” Alita Gotwald, who witnessed the crash, said.

The plane caught fire after crashing, according to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The Falcon Fire Department responded to the scene and was able to extinguish the fire.

“I was devastated, to say the least. I have never seen a plane flying so close over my head; it was pretty wild,” Gotwald said.

The FAA said O’Dell was the only person onboard the plane, a single-engine Cessna T210.

The FAA is the investigating agency and will address any future inquiries for this crash.

“I’m just sorry I couldn’t do anything here to help,” Gotwald said.

Part of McCandlish Road south of Falcon Highway was closed for several hours on Wednesday as investigators cleaned up the wreckage and taped off the area where the plane crashed. An EPCSO spokesperson said the National Transportation Safety Board is expected to clean up the rest of the plane Thursday morning.

“My heart goes out to the family,” Gotwald said. “That was such a devastating witness of death, right before me.”


https://www.fox21news.com






EL PASO COUNTY, Colorado — One person died Wednesday, after the small plane they were piloting crashed near Meadow Lake Airport in Falcon, according to the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office (EPCSO).

The crash happened just after 11:30 a.m. about a mile south-southeast of the airport, on McCandlish Road.

A witness who called 911 said the aircraft appeared to be attempting to land when it flipped over and came to rest upside down.

“I asked some onlookers if they saw anyone eject from the plane. Then suddenly, the fuel ignited and blew up, and I knew I needed to stand back,” Alita Gotwald, who witnessed the crash, said.

The plane caught fire after crashing, according to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The Falcon Fire Department responded to the scene and was able to extinguish the fire.

“I was devastated, to say the least. I have never seen a plane flying so close over my head; it was pretty wild,” Gotwald said.

The FAA said the pilot was the only person onboard the Cessna T210N Turbo Centurion.

The El Paso County Sheriff’s Office told FOX21 News the FAA has wrapped up its investigation into Wednesday’s crash and will release any further information.

“I’m just sorry I couldn’t do anything here to help,” Gotwald said.

Part of McCandlish Road south of Falcon Highway was closed for several hours on Wednesday as investigators cleaned up the wreckage and taped off the area where the plane crashed. An EPCSO spokesperson said the National Transportation Safety Board is expected to clean up the rest of the plane Thursday morning.

“My heart goes out to the family,” Gotwald said. “That was such a devastating witness of death, right before me.”

https://www.fox21news.com

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