Thursday, February 06, 2020

Cessna 140A, N9474A: Fatal accident occurred February 05, 2020 near Columbia Airport (O22),Tuolumne County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fresno, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

https://registry.faa.gov/N9474A

Location: Sonora, CA
Accident Number: WPR20FA086
Date & Time: 02/05/2020, 1807 PST
Registration: N9474A
Aircraft: Cessna 140
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On February 5, 2020, at 1807 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 140A airplane, N9474A, impacted terrain near Sonora, California, while on approach for landing to the Columbia Airport (O22), Columbia California. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the cross-country flight. The airplane departed Harris Ranch Airport (3O8), Coalinga, California at 1701.

According to the pilots' wife, the purpose of the flight was to take the passenger to Pismo Beach, California, for a business meeting. The intent was to complete the trip during the day so as not to have to fly at night. The flight was expected to return to O22 by 1700 the day of the accident.

According to radar data, the flight departed O22 and was tracked to Oceano County Airport (L52), Oceano, California. The flight departed L52 at 1543 and flew toward New Coalinga Municipal Airport (C80), Coalinga, California. The flight then flew from C80 to 3O8.

Fuel records obtained from 3O8, indicated that the airplane was fueled with approximately 20 gallons of 100 low-lead aviation fuel at 1656.

A witness near the accident site reported that he was working on his ranch and the daylight was starting to fade, he estimated it was around dusk when he heard a loud bang. He looked toward the noise and saw the airplane for about 3 seconds before he heard another bang followed by silence. Prior to that he had heard the airplane's engine, it was not making unusual sounds, so he wasn't paying attention to it.

The airplane came to rest inverted in-between two trees in a pasture at an elevation of 2,020 ft mean sea level (msl). The right wing separated and came to rest in low-lying branches. The left wing had partially separated and was wrapped around a tree. The empennage and the tail section remained attached to the cabin area with the tail section raised and leaning against a tree. The engine remained attached to the firewall in its normal position on the airframe; however, the propeller separated and came to rest underneath the right side of the airplane.

The airplane was recovered for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N9474A
Model/Series: 140 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 38.030556, -120.414444 (est) 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



Tuolumne County Sheriff's Office
**UPDATE: 2/6/20, 11:45 am**

The victims have been identified as 73-year-old Robert Clough and 71-year-old Robert Parriott, both of Sonora. Robert Clough was determined to be the pilot and Robert Parriott the solo passenger inside the aircraft.

The preliminary cause of death is major trauma; however, the final cause is pending autopsy.

The cause of the crash along with the circumstances are being investigated by the NTSB.

We are saddened by this tragic loss and want to extend our condolences to their family and friends.

**UPDATE: 8:00 pm**

Deputies will remain on scene throughout the night for scene security. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will arrive tomorrow to conduct an investigation.

Details are still being gathered and no identification has been made on the decedents. 

**ORIGINAL**

Right now, deputies are on scene of a small plane crash on the 21000 block of Springfield Road.

We got a call to our office just after 6 o’clock tonight. Two people in the plane have died. There is no threat to nearby communities. We don’t know the circumstances of the crash or the plane’s destination. We have notified the National Transportation Safety Board.




Update at 1:45 p.m.: Clarke Broadcasting has confirmed with the store manager of Twain Harte Market that 71-year-old Robert Parriott was the owner of that business, but the manager was not authorized to make any other statements. Additionally, the other victim, 73-year-old Robert Clough, also ran his own business, Clough Refrigeration, and was also a plumber. Clough moved to Sonora in the early 90’s and was an experienced pilot that had flown at night often, according to a family friend, who wanted to remain anonymous. Both men were well known in the community.

Regarding the investigation into the crash, Tuolumne County Sheriff’s spokesperson Nicco Sandelin updated, “Part of the NTSB-FAA investigation, in terms of whether or not they [Clough and Parriott] were supposed to be taking off or landing at the Columbia Airport, what was scheduled…and a flight itinerary — that will all be part of their investigation.”

Further details on the crash and cause of death written by News Director B.J. Hansen can be viewed below.

Original post at noon: Columbia, CA — The Tuolumne County Sheriff’s Office has released the names of the two victims in yesterday’s tragic plane crash in Columbia.

Deputy Niccoli Sandelin reports, “The victims have been identified as 73-year-old Robert Clough and 71-year-old Robert Parriott, both of Sonora. Robert Clough was determined to be the pilot and Robert Parriott the solo passenger inside the aircraft.”

He adds, “The preliminary cause of death is major trauma; however, the final cause is pending autopsy. The cause of the crash along with the circumstances are being investigated by the NTSB. We are saddened by this tragic loss and want to extend our condolences to their family and friends.”

Earlier: 

Update at 7 p.m: Tuolumne County Sheriff’s spokesperson Nicco Sandelin has confirmed to Clarke Broadcasting that two people have died in a plane crashed in the 21000 block of Springfield Road near the Columbia Airport. The plane went down just after 6 p.m. in a field behind a home.

There is no threat to nearby communities, according to Sandelin, who adds. ” We don’t know the circumstances of the crash or the plane’s destination. Don’t know if it was taking off, just flying by or maybe trying to land.” The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has been notified. Further details on the crash are below.

Original post at 6:35 p.m.: Columbia, CA — First responders are on the scene of a plane crash near the Columbia Airport.

The plane went down behind a home near a pond in the 21000 block of Springfield Road near Horseshoe Bend Road. Tuolumne County Sheriff’s Deputies are reporting that two people were in the plane and need to be extricated from it. There is no word on injuries, the type of plane or what caused it to go down.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.mymotherlode.com

COLUMBIA, California — Two people died after their plane crashed Wednesday evening in a field near a small airport in Tuolumne County, sheriff's officials confirmed.

The crash happened after 6 p.m. on Springfield Road in the small Tuolumne County town of Columbia. Tuolumne County Sheriff's officials said it is still too early to determine the cause of the plane crash.

Officials with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) arrived on Thursday to investigate the deadly crash.

Just before noon, authorities with the Tuolumne County Sheriff’s Office identified the victims as 73-year-old Robert Clough and 71-year-old Robert Parriott. Clough was identified as the pilot. Both men were from Sonora, authorities said.

It's unclear if the plane was coming or going to the area. It crashed near the Columbia Airport, a small airport that mostly houses smaller aircraft. The airport also serves as the home of one of CalFire's Air Attack bases, housing several of their aircraft for fighting California fires.

Story and video ➤ https://www.abc10.com



SONORA, California  — Two Sonora men were killed in a plane crash Wednesday evening in Tuolumne County, authorities said.

The victims have been identified as Robert Clough, 73, and Robert Parriott, 71, the Tuolumne County Sheriff's Office said Thursday.

Clough was piloting the plane when it crashed just after 6 p.m. in the 21000 block of Springfield Road, near the Columbia Airport in a field behind a home, the sheriff's office said.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the plane was a Cessna 140A. It crashed under unknown circumstances and flipped over.

People who knew Clough said he was a good pilot with years of experience.

“I’d say he was one of the safest, most brilliant guys to fly,” said Ron Neufeld.

The National Transportation Safety Board is working with the FAA to investigate the cause of the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://www.kcra.com

3 comments:

  1. Cross-controlled? Why the two bangs, though?

    ReplyDelete
  2. I knew Bob as a careful, methodical mechanic + pilot. I helped him restore that aircraft and flew with him many times. We worked at the Angwin airport along Freddie Frakes with his Grumman Mallard turboprop conversions. That was a great little Cessna. May both men rest in peace.

    ReplyDelete