Tuesday, February 04, 2020

Beechcraft 35-A33 Debonair, N123JB: Incident occurred February 03, 2020 at Ohio State University Airport (KOSU), Franklin County, Ohio

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio

Aircraft landed gear up.


https://registry.faa.gov/N123JB


Date: 03-FEB-20

Time: 18:56:00Z
Regis#: N123JB
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 35
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: COLUMBUS
State: OHIO 




COLUMBUS (WCMH)– A small plane’s landing gear malfunctioned, causing the plane to skid to a halt at Ohio State University’s Don Scott Field in northwest Columbus Monday.

According to the Ohio State Highway Patrol, the plane’s pilot, Paul M. Emaus, 54, of Hudsonville, Michigan, was attempting to land his Beechcraft 35-A33 Debonair aircraft, Monday at approximately 2 p.m.

The landing gear on the plane failed to activate, causing the underside of the aircraft to skid along the runway until it came to a stop.

Emaus was the only person onboard the plane. He was not injured.

The Federal Aviation Administration will be investigating the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.nbc4i.com








COLUMBUS, Ohio (WSYX/WTTE) — Ohio State Highway Patrol and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating a small plane crash at the Ohio State University Don Scott Airport Monday afternoon.

Troopers say Paul M. Emaus, 54, of Hudsonville, Michigan, was attempting to land his Beechcraft 35-A33 Debonair aircraft around 2 p.m. when his landing did not activate.

Emaus skidded his airplane across the runway until it came to a stop.

Emaus was not injured. The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

The airport was closed for about 15 minutes as crews responded.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://abc6onyourside.com

7 comments:

  1. I did a double-take when I saw this N-number...the last time I saw it, it was on a black King Air 90 being used by singer James Brown. It landed one night @ GSO and taxied up to Greensboro-High Point Air Service, where Dad worked and I hung out. James was late for his concert, and there was plenty of excitement among us about him being there, but I'll never forget that King Air, and it's n-number.

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  2. These gear failures seem to be happening more and more. What gives.

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    1. A fairly complex mechanism with electrical and mechanical elements, still in service 59 years later. No way to know when the internals of switch or breaker or contact will stop making contact. Except for lifting up during annual, never cycled on ground so all failures are during flights. Many similar aircraft with aging non-internally inspectable parts.

      Some gear collapse failures may be over-center linkages that don't hold, for whatever reason. Always a surprise to hear that a Mooney with Johnson bar collapses - not latched or latch broken?

      Did this guy not try the manual deploy?

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  3. That switch in the shape of a wheel needs to be flicked down. That way the wheels will come down.

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  4. "That switch in the shape of a wheel needs to be flicked down."

    Not if it has the old-style "piano keyboard" instrument panel that simply has the half-round plastic on top of the switch.

    https://www.euroga.org/system/1/user_files/files/000/039/465/39465/00b08404c/large/IMG_9784.JPG

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    Replies
    1. Excellent point. If it has the piano keyboard -- and it certainly might -- then the switch with the half-round on top needs to be flicked down. You flick it down and down come the wheels.

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    2. ^^I can't believe the FAA in certification even allowed that to be a gear selector switch design.

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