Saturday, February 9, 2019

Convair C-131B Samaritan, N145GT: Fatal accident occurred February 08, 2019 in Miami, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Cargo flight crashed due to unknown circumstances. 


Conquest Air Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N145GT


Date: 08-FEB-19
Time: 17:18:00Z
Regis#: N145GT
Aircraft Make: CONVAIR
Aircraft Model: C 131B
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: DESTROYED
Activity: CARGO
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 135
City: MIAMI
State: FLORIDA

MIAMI - The U.S. Coast Guard suspended its search Saturday for a cargo pilot whose plane crashed Friday off the coast of Bay Harbor Islands.

The 1955 Convair C-131B cargo plane was traveling from the Bahamas to Opa-locka when it crashed about 13 miles east of Bay Harbor Islands just after noon Friday.

The Coast Guard said the search for the pilot, 68-year-old Capt. Robert Hopkins of Coconut Creek, encompassed 364 nautical miles and lasted about 21 hours.

The crew of a Coast Guard plane, already in the air on a training mission, spotted the plane's co-pilot, 28-year-old Rolland Silva, on Friday floating on a life raft. 

A Coast Guard helicopter pulled Silva from the water and he was eventually taken to Jackson Memorial Hospital's Ryder Trauma Center. Relatives said he was conscious and doctors were treating his injuries. He was listed in stable condition.

Hopkins' fiancee, Michele Gure, said he texted with Hopkins regularly and knew late Friday afternoon that something wasn't right when he stopped responding.

“Everybody loved him, everybody can count on him, I anything happened to you or your family he was the one that would be called, he’s loved by so many which is so obvious,” Gure said. “I love him so much. I don’t want to lose him. He wasn’t supposed to leave.”

A representative of Miami Lakes-based Conquest Air Cargo released a statement saying the pilot declared an emergency and attempted to a water landing during during a return from a cargo delivery. The company provides daily flights between Opa-locka and Lynden Pindling International Airport in the Bahamas.

"Our thoughts remain with the family of Capt. Robert Hopkins at this difficult time. This is a tremendous loss for our company. Capt. Hopkins' selfless leadership was and will always remain an example for us all," the company said Saturday.

It appeared the aircraft broke up after it hit the water. Investigators determined the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Gure said she is trying to come to terms with Hopkins' death.

“It just sickens me right now. It’s just surreal. It’s crazy,” she said.


Story and video ➤ https://www.local10.com


Capt. Robert Hopkins

HUTCHINSON ISLAND, Florida - A wing from a cargo plane that crashed into the Atlantic Ocean last week off the South Florida coast washed ashore Monday morning on Hutchinson Island.

The U.S. Coast Guard said the wing is from the Conquest Air Cargo plane that crashed into the water Friday about 13 miles east of Bay Harbor Islands.

Robert Hopkins, 68, of Coconut Creek, was piloting the plane from the Bahamas to Miami-Opa-locka Executive Airport when it crashed. A representative for Conquest Air Cargo released a statement saying the pilot declared an emergency and attempted a water landing.

A Coast Guard helicopter crew rescued the co-pilot, Rolland Silva, 28, but Hopkins was never found. The Coast Guard suspended its search Saturday.

Silva was taken to Jackson Memorial Hospital's Ryder Trauma Center to be treated for his injuries. He was listed in stable condition.

Story and video ➤https://www.local10.com



MIAMI - The U.S. Coast Guard suspended its search Saturday for a cargo pilot whose plane crashed Friday off the coast of Bay Harbor Island.

The 1955 Convair C-131B cargo plane was traveling from the Bahamas to Opa-locka when it crashed about 13 miles east of Bay Harbor Islands just after noon Friday.

The Coast Guard said the search for the pilot, 68-year-old Capt. Robert Hopkins, encompassed 364 nautical miles and lasted about 21 hours.

The crew of a Coast Guard plane, already in the air on a training mission, spotted the plane's co-pilot, 28-year-old Rolland Silva, on Friday floating on a life raft. 

A Coast Guard helicopter pulled Silva from the water and he was eventually taken to Jackson Memorial Hospital's Ryder Trauma Center. Relatives said he was conscious and doctors were treating his injuries. He was listed in stable condition.

A representative of Miami Lakes-based Conquest Air Cargo released a statement saying the pilot declared an emergency and attempted to a water landing during during a return from a cargo delivery. The company provides daily flights between Opa-locka and Lynden Pindling International Airport in the Bahamas.

"Our thoughts remain with the family of Capt. Robert Hopkins at this difficult time. This is a tremendous loss for our company. Capt. Hopkins' selfless leadership was and will always remain an example for us all," the company said Saturday.

It appeared the aircraft broke up after it hit the water. Investigators determined the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Story and video ➤ https://www.local10.com




OPA-LOCKA, Florida  - The U.S. Coast Guard rescued a co-pilot and continued searching for a pilot on Saturday, hours after a Convair C-131B Samaritan plane traveling from the Bahamas to Opa-locka crashed about 13 miles east of Bay Harbor Islands.

The survivor, 28-year-old Rolland Silva, was in luck on Friday. The U.S. Coast Guard already had a helicopter up in the air. The Coast Guard pilot, who was conducting training exercises, rushed to the area and found Silva waving his arms from a small, canary-yellow inflatable lifeboat.

Silva, the flight's first officer, was injured, but not badly enough that he wasn't able to climb into the hanging basket the crew used to hoist him out of the water and into the helicopter. He didn't know where the pilot was. 

"We have another chopper out there searching," Lt. Cmdr. Gabe Somma said less than four hours after the crash. "We are looking for another survivor."

The Coast Guard helicopter flew Silva to the station in Opa-locka, where Miami-Dade Fire Rescue picked him up and flew him to Jackson Memorial Hospital's Ryder Trauma Center. Relatives said he was conscious, and although doctors were treating his injuries, he was in stable condition. 

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, Conquest Air Cargo flight 504 departed from the Lynden Pindling International Airport in Nassau, Bahamas, and it was headed to Miami-Opa-locka Executive Airport when it hit the sea about 12:15 p.m.

A representative of Miami Lakes-based Conquest Air Cargo released a statement saying the pilot declared an emergency and attempted to water land the Convair C-131B cargo plane during a return from a cargo delivery. The company provides daily flights between Opa-locka and Lynden Pindling International Airport in the Bahamas.

The plane's FAA registration history shows Conquest Air Inc. registered the Convair C-131B Samaritan with two Pratt & Whitney R-2800 engines on April 26, 2018, after buying it from Kestrel Inc., of West Des Moines, Iowa.

FlightAware records show the plane with registration N145GT departed about 43 minutes late at 11:13 a.m., and was set to land at 12:24 p.m. According to the AirNav Radar Box records, the cargo plane started to lose altitude at about 4,600 feet and some 10 minutes later -- at 1,200 feet -- it ditched into the ocean.

It appeared the aircraft broke up after it hit the water during an attempted water landing. Investigators determined the aircraft was damaged beyond repair. One of the two occupants vanished. 


Story and video ➤ https://www.local10.com

OPA-LOCKA, Florida (WSVN) - The Coast Guard has rescued one person and crews are searching for a second one after a small cargo plane crashed in the water about 15 miles off the Haulover Inlet.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, a Convair C-131B Samaritan aircraft landed in the water about 20 miles southeast of Miami-Opa Locka Executive Airport, around 12:15 p.m. on Friday.

“It appears it broke up when it hit the water, and parts of it sank,” said U.S. Coast Guard Cmdr. Gabe Somma.

7Skyforce HD hovered above one of the occupants in a raft near the wreckage of the plane as he waited to be rescued.

Officials said a Coast Guard crew was just nine miles away when the call for help came in.

“The pilots on scene were out on a training mission, happened to be in the area at the right time,” said Somma. “When they got on scene, they observed one survivor in the water waving their arms.”

A Coast Guard helicopter arrived on the scene and hoisted the man in the raft, who was able to climb into the basket on his own.

Once he was safely lifted to the helicopter, he was flown to OPF. Still inside the basket, the man was removed from the aircraft.

The man appeared to have cuts on his forehead and chin. Rescuers placed bandages around his head before he was loaded into another chopper.

“[Crews] coordinated with Miami-Dade Fire Rescue to get that survivor over to Jackson Trauma,” said Somma.

Officials have not specified the extent of his injuries.

The plane had departed from Lynden Pindling International Airport in Nassau, Bahamas and was headed to OPF.

Conquest Air released a statement that read in part, “The aircraft was returning from a cargo delivery from Nassau, Bahamas. Our concern is with our flight crew, and we will continue to coordinate with the relevant authorities.”

Federal Aviation Administration and Coast Guard officials said there were two people reported on board the plane. The Coast Guard later launched a second chopper to assist in the search for the missing crew member.

“Obviously, time’s critical. That’s why the first aircraft was able to get out there. They’re already up flying,” said U.S. Coast Guard Lt. Nathan White.

“When there’s a search-and-rescue case going on, a lot of heads down, pilots and air crews are focused on trying to find a survivor,” said Somma. “Someone’s life is in danger, and we’re looking to find that survivor. It’s difficult to find a person in the water. Essentially, you’re looking for a human head and maybe some arms waving outside of the water, so you’re looking for a basketball floating on the ocean.”

Miami-Dade Air Rescue crews responded to the scene with a diver to assist in the search.

“We’ll continue searching. We do have good conditions, good daylight hours left behind here, and we’re going to throw everything we’ve got at this,” said U.S. Coast Guard Lt. Joseph Messina.

Authorities have not released the names of the occupants who were on board the cargo plane.

Story and video ➤ https://wsvn.com

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Sad crash but I'm surprised that an aircraft this old and using radial engines is still being operated routinely by an air cargo operation. It should be in a museum.

Anonymous said...

^^Not at all. There are plenty of radial powered 1940's era cargo freighters flying not just in the US but around the world, from DC-3s to DC-7s and various Convair aircraft. They are inexpensive to buy, relatively cheap to maintain due to their simplistic ruggedness and availability of spare parts and engines, and probably most important to the cargo carrier, have a great pound per mile cost. If they are still in flying condition, FLY THEM!

Anonymous said...

A visit to the Miami area and you can witness many of these old birds still earning their keep.