Wednesday, November 6, 2019

Cessna 150M, N9420U

https://registry.faa.gov/N9420U


A Springfield Township, Ohio, man has been accused of flying a small, private plane close to Stambaugh Stadium during a Youngstown State University football game.

Christopher Wilkinson appeared for arraignment Friday in Youngstown Municipal Court on charges of inducing panic and disorderly conduct.

YSU Police filed the charges after Wilkinson allegedly flew a Cessna 150M close to the press box and stadium lights while fans were watching the September 28th game against Robert Morris.

Youngstown State University police notified the Federal Aviation Administration immediately who then launched an investigation on who it was and why they did it.

The owner of the plane told 21 News he was not flying the plane but rented it out to a man he says usually flies jets for a living.

According to Federal Aviation Administration records, Wilkinson is a commercial pilot licensed to fly private planes and land multi-engine aircraft,

Wilkinson pleaded not guilty and is scheduled to appear in court again on January 7th.

Story and video ➤ https://www.wfmj.com


New Middletown, Ohio, pilot arraigned in Youngstown State University fly-by: Charged with inducing panic, disorderly conduct


November 5th, 2019

YOUNGSTOWN — A New Middletown pilot has been charged in the September 28th incident where a small plane flew too close to Stambaugh Stadium, alarming spectators at a Youngstown State University football game.

Christopher Wilkinson, 30, 9211 Youngstown-Pittsburgh Road, New Middletown, pleaded not guilty Friday in Youngstown Municipal Court to charges of inducing panic and disorderly conduct.

According to court records, YSU police filed the charges after the police investigation into why a Cessna 150M flew close to the press box and stadium lights on the east side of Stambaugh Stadium during the September 28th football game between YSU and Robert Morris.

According to Federal Aviation Administration records, Wilkinson received his commercial pilot’s license on March 21st, 2018, and is certified to fly and land single- and multi-engine craft with instruments.

The charges are first- and fourth-degree misdemeanors, and Wilkinson is scheduled to appear January 7th, 2020, before Municipal Judge Carla Baldwin for a pre-trial hearing.

Reports indicate the small plane was circling the stadium several times at low altitudes near the lights and the press box during the late-afternoon game in which the Penguins defeated Robert Morris University, 45-10, for the team’s fourth victory of the year.

Initial reports said the incident had disturbed many people in the stands.

An attempt to contact Wilkinson was unsuccessful.

Chris Tornello of Youngstown said he is the one who owns the Cessna 150 aircraft and had said the plane was used by an experienced pilot who has regularly flown jets.

“This is unfortunate. We haven’t had this type of incident before,” Tornello said. “This pilot just made a mistake, but he is very experienced.”

Tornello said Wilkinson had flown the plane out of Youngstown-Warren Regional Airport in Vienna and the flight records were provided to the FAA for its investigation.

According to YSU police Chief Shawn V. Varso, the FAA investigation– which is separate from the YSU investigation — is ongoing.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.vindy.com



Federal Aviation Administration says probe will take months

October 1st, 2019 

YOUNGSTOWN — The Federal Aviation Administration will take several months to find out why a small plane flew low over Stambaugh Stadium on Saturday, startling gridiron fans during the Youngstown State University football game.

Elizabeth Isham Cory, public affairs spokeswoman for FAA’s Great Lakes Region, said her agency does not discuss open investigations. Cory said the FAA only has authority to level civil penalties against the pilot of the aircraft, while criminal charges, if any, have to be filed by law enforcement.

Reports indicate the small plane was circling the stadium several times at low altitudes near the lights and the press box on the east side of the stadium during the early-evening game in which the Penguins defeated Robert Morris University, 45-10, for the team’s fourth straight victory.

Initial reports said the incident had disturbed many people in the stands.

Chris Tornello of Youngstown said he owns the Cessna 150M and did not fly the plane Saturday. He said the plane was used by an experienced pilot who has regularly flown jets.

“This is unfortunate. We haven’t had this type of incident before. We are trying to get this under control,” Tornello said. “This pilot just made a mistake, but he is very experienced.”

Tornello said the information from the flight tower at the Youngstown Warren Regional Airport will be forwarded to FAA’s Flight District Standards office in Cleveland for the investigation.

The Cleveland office will determine the sanctions against the pilot, whom Tornello chose not to name.

Ron Cole, communications director with YSU, said the YSU Police Department handled the initial investigation, but a police spokesman on Monday referred all questions to Cole, who could not be reached by the newspaper.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.vindy.com



Owner says pilot rented plane that flew over Youngstown State University game

The Federal Aviation Administration is leading an investigation after a small plane was flown around Stambaugh Stadium at low altitudes several times during the Penguin's game against Robert Morris on September 28th.

The owners of a plane that flew over Youngstown State University's football game Saturday night say they were not the ones in the cockpit. 

Chris Tornello and his wife Roberta tell 21 News they were in Nashville, Tennessee on Saturday night in another plane they own. They say they had rented the plane to an experienced pilot, but don't want to give out that pilot's name at this point. 

Chris Tornello tells 21 News the person who had the plane is an experienced pilot who has flown jets and is only a few training hours shy of being able to pilot commercial aircraft. 

The Federal Aviation Administration is leading an investigation after the small plane was flown around Stambaugh Stadium at low altitudes several times during the Penguin's home football game against Robert Morris Saturday afternoon. 

21 News was at the game and captured video of the incident. In that video, you can see the plane appear to fly extremely close to the press box, and stadium lights as the game is going on.

A spokesperson for the FAA told 21 News the agency is conducting an independent investigation involving the report of a low-flying aircraft in Youngstown and will take several months. 

According to the FAA, the regulatory agency cannot file criminal charges but can take civil action.

Local law enforcement is the only agency able to file criminal charges in investigations such as this. 

YSU Spokesman Ron Cole said YSUPD is in contact with the FAA to find out what happened and what options they have to proceed with the investigation.

At that point, they will confer with the prosecutor's office to determine if criminal charges are warranted. 

Cole said this would determine what YSUPD will do next in coordination with the Youngstown Police Department and the university.

Story and video ➤ https://www.wfmj.com

5 comments:

Unknown said...

The Golden Rule:
“One pass then haul ass!”

Anonymous said...


The report is confusing. It states the pilot is 'very experienced' yet he is only 30 years old and got his commercial pilots license March 21, 2018. It goes on to say he flies jets. Who in their right mind would allow a pilot that exhibits this level of decision making fly their jet?

Anonymous said...

I think there is more to this than we know about ? it just does not make sense why a commercial pilot would risk his ticket for such a stupid act.

Anonymous said...

“One pass then haul ass!”
I love you!!

Anonymous said...

The Golden Rule:
“One pass then haul ass!”


That used to work before the 2000s before everyone had portable video recorders and cameras at their fingertips called cell phones (and before 9/11 changed the public's perception of aviation forever).

But being around a sporting event and doing this when TV cameras are around, that's just stupid. Insofar as myself saying I've ever gone below the 500' rule outside of during a takeoff or landing or emergency in decades past, I have no comment.