Wednesday, July 24, 2019

Cirrus SR22, N921CD: Fatal accident occurred July 24, 2019 near Jimmy Carter Regional Airport (KACJ), Americus, Sumter County, Georgia

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia
Continental Motors Inc.; Mobile, Alabama
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota
  
Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 
  
https://registry.faa.gov/N921CD

Location: Americus, GA
Accident Number: ERA19FA234
Date & Time: 07/24/2019, 0550 EDT
Registration: N921CD
Aircraft: Cirrus SR22
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 24, 2019, about 0550 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus SR22, N921CD, was destroyed when it collided with terrain shortly after takeoff from Jimmy Carter Regional Airport (ACJ), Americus, Georgia. The commercial pilot and the pilot rated passenger were fatally injured. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight which originated from ACJ about 0547. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to a friend of the pilot, the purpose of the flight was to attend the 2019 EAA AirVenture Oshkosh, in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Preliminary radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), showed the airplane's radar track as five radar targets over a span of 1 minute, and the targets were 12 seconds apart. A line connecting each target as well as the accident site, depicted a 180°, left-hand arc. The first target was located about 1,700 ft beyond the departure end of runway 5 (468 ft elevation) at 900 ft mean sea level (msl), 432 ft above ground level (agl). The airplane's second target was at 1,200 ft msl, the next three targets were at 1,300 ft msl, and the final target was at 1,100 ft msl.

According to a witness, his attention was drawn to the sound of an airplane engine about 0550. He said the sound of the engine was "whining" and "loud."

According to FAA airmen records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane single-engine sea, and instrument airplane. In addition, he held an airframe and powerplant mechanic certificate. The pilot was issued a second-class medical certificate on January 11, 2019, with the limitation of "must have available glasses for near vision." At that time, he reported 22,000 hours of total flight time, 300 hours of which were within the 6 months prior to the examination.

According to FAA airmen records, the pilot-rated passenger held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land and instrument airplane. In addition, he held an airframe and powerplant mechanic certificate. The pilot-rated passenger was issued a second-class medical certificate on April 20, 2018, with the limitation of "must have available glasses for near vision." At that time, he reported 1,850 hours total hours of flight experience.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the airplane was manufactured in 2002 and registered to a corporation in April 2014. It was equipped with a Continental Motors IO-550-N series, 310-horsepower engine that drove a Hartzell constant-speed propeller. According to airplane maintenance logbooks, the most recent annual inspection was completed on April 3, 2018, at 1,767.2 total aircraft hours. Each of the last three annual inspections were completed approximately every other year.

The airplane came to rest on a pecan farm at an elevation of 477 ft, and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path was about 400 ft long oriented about a 180° heading. The initial tree strike was observed about 100 ft above the ground. The initial ground scar was observed about 50 ft beyond the tree strike, and the airplane came to rest about 75 ft beyond the initial ground scar. Several pecan trees along the debris path were damaged by fire and wilted consistent with fuel blight.

The airframe and flight control surfaces were highly fragmented. The rudder pedals and control sticks were impact separated from their mounts in the cockpit, but control cable continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to attachments and bellcranks associated with flight control surfaces through overload breaks and cuts by first responders. The Horizontal Situation Indicator (HSI) and attitude indicator were separated by impact and found along the wreckage path. They were disassembled, and each displayed rotation scoring on their respective gyros and housings.

The Cirrus Aircraft Parachute System (CAPS) was examined, and the safety pin, with its "Remove Before Flight" banner attached, remained installed in the deployment handle. The parachute remained in its deployment bag, and the suspension lines and risers were draped over a tree in the direction of the main wreckage.

The engine was separated from the airframe and the crankcase was split down its spine. Crankshaft continuity was confirmed from the forward section of the engine to the accessory section. All connecting rods were still attached to their respective journals. The No. 6 connecting rod was separated from the piston, but the piston pin was not damaged. The torsion dampers were still attached to the crankshaft with all pins. The Nos. 1, 3, 5, 2, and 4 cylinders remained attached to the crankcase and the fins exhibited impact damage. The No. 6 cylinder remained attached to the crankcase, but the cylinder head was impact separated from the barrel. Examination of the valves and piston domes revealed normal wear and combustion deposits with no anomalies noted.

Both magnetos were separated from the engine, but could not be tested due to impact damage. The impulse couplings operated when rotated by hand. The oil filter was impact separated from the engine. The oil filter was dated "7/7/17" and had a Hobbs time of "1,760.8." It was disassembled and no metallic debris was noted in the oil filter.

The propeller was separated from the airplane, but all three propeller blades remained attached to the hub. The propeller blades each displayed similar twisting, bending, and chordwise scratching.

The 0550 recorded weather observation at ACJ, which was located about 2 miles south of the accident site, included an overcast ceiling at 500 ft, and wind from 050° at 5 knots. The visibility was 10 miles, the temperature was 22° C, the dew point was 21° C; and the altimeter setting was 29.95 inches of mercury.

According to the Astronomical Applications Department at the United States Naval Observatory, the sunrise was at 0646 and the beginning of civil twilight was at 0619.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cirrus
Registration: N921CD
Model/Series: SR22 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:No 
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: ACJ, 468 ft msl
Observation Time: 0550 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 50°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Americus, GA (ACJ)
Destination: Oshkosh, WI

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 32.136111, -84.194444

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Mr. Michael Paul Cochran
February 18, 1956 - July 24, 2019

Mr. Michael Paul Cochran, age 63, passed away Wednesday, July 24, 2019. A celebration of life will be held at 11:00 a.m. Saturday, July 27, 2019 at Central Baptist Church. Dr. Bryan Myers, Reverend Earl Dunmon, and Reverend Sam Tate will officiate.

Mr. Cochran was born February 18, 1956 in Americus. He was the son of the late Paul Henry Cochran and the late Martha Ann Norton Cochran. Mike retired from South Georgia Technical College as the Department Director of Avionics. After his retirement, he worked for Thrush Aircraft traveling abroad overseeing the assembling of aircraft and teaching aviation maintenance. He was a member of the Americus Exchange Club and the HAM Radio Club, and a member of the Young Eagles Pilots Association. He provided hundreds of airplane rides to young people. His enthusiasm for aviation was inspiring to others. Mike was a local historian for Southerfield Aviation. 

He was a kind and devout Christian. He was a faithful member of Cheek Memorial Baptist Church where he served as a Deacon and the Sound Technician for 34 years.

Survivors include his wife, Nancy Ellis Cochran of Americus; two daughters and son-in-laws, Kelly and Britt Bazemore of Albany, Katie French of Atlanta, and a special sister-in-law Kimberly Williams (Ken) of Atlanta; a sister Debra Cochran Short (Rufus) of Americus; a brother Mark Cochran (Lynn) of Covington, GA; two sisters-in-laws, Debra Garrett of Valdosta and Emily Iaconis (Chris) of Locust Grove, GA; one brother-in-law, Mike Ellis (Debbie) of Smyrna, GA; seven grandchildren, Nate French, Ella French, Clara French, Mary Ellis Bazemore, Carlisle Bazemore, Carolina Williams and Ellis Williams; two aunts, Mary Davis (Eugene) and Diane McClung (Johnnie); and four uncles, David Norton (Joyce), Jimmy Norton (Carol), JB Norton, and Ralph Norton (Sheryl). Several nieces and nephews as well as his beloved family in Bryson City, NC. And two special friends, Jason Wisham and William Bays also survive.

Memorial contributions may be made to Gideons International Americus Camp, P.O. Box 722, Americus, GA 31709 or to South Georgia Technical College Foundation, The Mike Cochran Endowed Aviation Maintenance Technology Scholarship, P.O. Box 6102, Americus, GA 31709.

To sign the on-line guest book and share your condolences with the family visit www.aldridgefuneralservices.com. Aldridge Funeral Services 612 Rees Park is in charge of these arrangements. 

https://www.aldridgefuneralservices.com

Edd Larry Anthony
July 20, 1950 - July 24, 2019


Edd Larry Anthony, age 69, of Americus, died Wednesday, July 24, 2019. A native of Columbus, Ga., he was born July 20, 1950, the son of the late Edd Herbert Anthony and Dorris Reeves Anthony. He was a member of Calvary Baptist Church in Columbus and also attended Bethel Baptist Church in Americus. Mr. Anthony was the owner of Leesburg Spraying Service for 32 years and was an Ag Pilot for over 40 years. He enjoyed going to the beach and fishing. He attended Georgia Southwestern College and was a member of Sigma Chi.

A celebration of life service will be held Thursday, August 1, 2019, at 10:30 am at Bethel Baptist Church with Rev. Chet Ragsdale and Rev. Steven Golden officiating. Family will receive friends in the sanctuary of the church following the service.

Survivors include his wife, Jan Parker Anthony; a son, Edd Parker Anthony, both of Americus; a sister, Pat (Bobby) Williamson of Huntsville, Al.; mother-in-law, Jewell Parker of Americus; two sisters-in-law, Pam (Scott) Whitaker and Kathy Arnold; a brother-in-law, Gary (Jan) Parker; several nieces and nephews including Jennifer (Brian) Parker and Joey Williamson; and a very special family friend, Bill Garrett. He is preceded in death by his father-in-law, Max L. Parker. In Lieu of flowers, the family suggests that you make a contribution to the charity of your choice.

https://www.greghancockfuneralchapel.com

The victims in the plane crash from Wednesday have been identified, with funeral service arrangements in progress.

The two victims have been identified as Michael Paul Cochran, 63, of Americus; and Edd Larry Anthony, 69, of Americus.

Both men, pilots, passed in a plane accident that occurred Wednesday, July 24.

Cochran’s funeral arrangements are in the care of Aldridge Funeral Services, and Anthony’s are in the care of Greg Hancock Funeral Chapel.

Cochran was formerly the Director of Avionics at South Georgia Technical College before retirement, after which he began working for Thursh Aircraft, overseeing aircraft assembly and teaching aviation maintenance.

Cochran leaves behind “his wife, Nancy Ellis Cochran of Americus; two daughters and son-in-laws, Kelly and Britt Bazemore of Albany, Katie French of Atlanta, and a special sister-in-law Kimberly Williams (Ken) of Atlanta; a sister Debra Cochran Short (Rufus) of Americus; a brother Mark Cochran (Lynn) of Covington, GA; two sisters-in-laws, Debra Garrett of Valdosta and Emily Iaconis (Chris) of Locust Grove, GA; one brother-in-law, Mike Ellis (Debbie) of Smyrna, GA; seven grandchildren, Nate French, Ella French, Clara French, Mary Ellis Bazemore, Carlisle Bazemore, Carolina Williams and Ellis Williams; two aunts, Mary Davis (Eugene) and Diane McClung (Johnnie); and four uncles, David Norton (Joyce), Jimmy Norton (Carol), JB Norton, and Ralph Norton (Sheryl). Several nieces and nephews as well as his beloved family in Bryson City, NC. And two special friends, Jason Wisham and William Bays also survive,” according to an Aldridge Funeral Services obituary.

A celebration of life will be held on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. at Central Baptist Church to honor Cochran’s memory.

Original article ➤ https://www.wrbl.com

AMERICUS — A 4 p.m. Thursday news conference near the scene of the early Wednesday morning plane crash that killed two in Sumter County revealed little new information.

Heidi Kemner, an air safety investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) in Virginia, gave a brief overview of the investigation. She said all the debris from the wreckage of the single-engine aircraft was being collected and moved to another location for analysis. She said her report should be complete and made public within 10 days.

Kemner said her office is working with the Sumter County Coroner’s Office to identify the remains. Sumter County Chief Deputy Col. Eric Bryant said the Georgia Bureau of Investigation Region 3 Office, which is also working on the crash, said that process could still take two to three weeks.

“Meanwhile,” Bryant said, “the Cochran and Anthony families feel certain it is their loved ones and are making funeral arrangements.” That would be Mike Cochran and Edd Anthony, pilot of the plane, who were enroute to Wisconsin to attend the Oshkosh Air Show.

The NTSB is also in charge of the wreckage clean-up, according to Bryant, and the property was to be turned back over to the property owner by the end of day on Thursday.

Bryant said a resident in the area of the crash had advised authorities that they had heard a loud explosion between 5:30 to 5:45 a.m. Wednesday. The wreckage was found some time after 9 a.m. by workers on the pecan farm and first responders were notified at 9:30 a.m.


Original article ➤ https://www.americustimesrecorder.com



Col. Eric Bryant, Chief Deputy of the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office, speaks at a press conference Wednesday afternoon regarding a plane crash that took place on Wednesday morning, July 24th, at Horne Farms, located on Old Andersonville Road in Andersonville. According to early reports, the crash claimed the lives of the two people who were aboard.


AMERICUS –The wreckage of a plane crash was discovered on the morning of Wednesday, July 24, on the premises of Horne Farms, about a mile north of the Jimmy Carter Regional Airport.

At a press conference held Wednesday afternoon at 4 p.m., Col. Eric Bryant, Chief Deputy of the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office, said that the local 911 center received a call at approximately 9:30 a.m. Wednesday morning. The caller stated that he had discovered what appeared to be the wreckage of a downed plane. Bryant stated that first responders came to the scene, where they did in fact find the wreckage of a single-engine plane that had crashed in a pecan orchard at Horne Farms, located at 303 Old Andersonville Road in Andersonville. According to Bryant, the wreckage was beyond recognition.

“We were able to tell that it was in fact a single-engine plane,” Bryant said. “We have currently on scene, along with the sheriff’s office, Georgia Bureau of Investigation, along with the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board is also on the scene. We’re working with all of those agencies to identify first the plane and also, unfortunately, the two victims that were also in the wreckage. At this point, we are working with all of those entities to help properly and to positively identify the victims in the wreckage.”

Bryant went on to say that the scene would be active throughout Wednesday evening and probably well into Thursday morning until investigators are able to make a 100 percent identification of the plane and its occupants. According to Bryant, the investigation has so far revealed that there were only two victims in the plane when it crashed. “We’ve been working with our local airport, as well as neighboring airports, to secure information on what flight or what plane that might have been moving around early this morning,” Bryant said. Bryant went on to say that it appears that the plane crash took place early Wednesday morning before the 911 call was received. “The 911 call again came in at 9:30 a.m. and the wreckage was discovered by workers here at the farm located here on Old Andersonville Road,” Bryant said.

Bryant said that the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office is working with state and national agencies such as the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board to identify the victims and to properly notify the families. However, that has not been done yet because they are still trying to identify the plane and its occupants.

Bryant said that the cause of the crash has not yet been determined and that the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are helping to try to figure out what might have happened. He also stated that there is a possibility that no one heard the crash. “We are trying to narrow down the time frame in which this incident might have occurred,” Bryant said.

Bryant was asked if the plane was coming into the area or departing. He replied that at this point, investigators are not sure, but that the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office is working with local airports to see whether or not they had any flight plans slated for Wednesday. “We don’t know if this was a plane that left here in Sumter County, or if it was a plane that was going through. At this point, we’re working to try to make that determination,” Bryant said. He added that the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office, Georgia Bureau of Investigation and the Federal Aviation Administration are all currently on the scene and that a representative from the National Transportation Safety Board is en route to the crash site.

Bryant went on to say that the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office is dealing with the challenges brought on by speculation and rampant rumors regarding the crash. “Unfortunately, we do have several local pilots that live here in Sumter County, so of course, their families are very concerned as to whether or not it may be their loved ones,” Bryant said. “But of course, until we positively identify these victims, therefore, we haven’t notified anybody.” Bryant went on to say that the community is on edge about the crash and who the victims might be.

Bryant said that bad weather is being looked at as one of the possible causes of the crash. “I can tell you that the two agencies that are coming in, that will be one of the things they’ll be looking into,” Bryant said. “Of course, I’m not sure whether or not there were rainy conditions this morning.” Bryant went on to say that both the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will try to figure out what the weather conditions were like at the time of the crash and whether or not weather played a role.

Bryant also stated that due to the extent of the wreckage, the gender of the victims has yet to be identified. “We want to wait until the proper identification has been done through forensic examinations,” Bryant said. As to how large and widespread the debris field is, according to Bryant, it’s the size of a football field. Bryant also mentioned that according to the size of the wreckage, it appears that the plane was a small engine plane capable of carrying up to two people. “We’re still working with our aviation investigators to fully determine that,” Bryant said.

According to Bryant, before Wednesday morning’s fatal plane crash, the last plane crash that the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office investigated occurred about four to six months ago at an “aircraft hobby field”. That plane was a single-engine plane and the victims survived that crash. Bryant added that when more information is available, the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office would make that information available.

Original article ➤ https://www.americustimesrecorder.com

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Not much info to go on this one. No FlightAware tracking either. My guess is LOC in IMC, no chute deployed.

Anonymous said...

I'm curious whether there's a valid and/or legal scenario for departing in night IMC without filing a flight plan. Or am I missing something here? I have my PPL but don't have IR yet.

Anonymous said...

What's the point of guessing?

Anonymous said...

None of this makes any sense. It's got ? marks all over it. Two professional pilots, one with 22k hours and another with over 1800...

1. Do not file a flight plan for night imc.
2. Obviously did not follow the Cirrus checklist.
3. The ceiling should have been obvious, even at that time in the morning.
4. No weather briefing?

Take off, make a 180, crash and kill themselves. These were not <300 hour wanna-be's. They were pros. I'll be eagerly waiting the NTSB report.

Anonymous said...

Let's not forget that the airplane's annual inspection interval was consistently delayed. Whether the aircraft was owned by one of the accident pilots during those periods wasn't mentioned but every element of this crash is incredible. A takeoff in the dark into IMC without ATC contact? Maybe Oshkosh was only the stated destination?