Sunday, October 28, 2018

Cessna 401B, owned and operated by the pilot, N401HH: Fatal accident occurred October 04, 2017 in Salters, Williamsburg County, South Carolina

Henry Curtis Haddock

Henry Curtis Haddock, a Kingstree, South Carolina, native who turned a love of flying into a lifelong career, died on October 4th, 2017. He was 66. 

Mr. Haddock graduated from Kingstree High School before earning a degree in Aircraft Technology from Florence-Darlington Technical College. As an aircraft mechanic at the Florence airport, Mr. Haddock yearned to get off the ground. At 17, he learned to fly. He earned local notoriety when he built a 1949 Piper Clipper from a “pile of parts” he had purchased.


Alec Taylor of Taylor Helicopters saw potential in the young Mr. Haddock. He offered him his first flying gig, crop dusting with a Cessna “Ag Wagon” in Latta, South Carolina. Several years later Mr. Haddock started his own company, Haddock Flying Service, Inc. The company used Hiller helicopters to spray timber and crops throughout the Southeast.  Mr. Haddock often piloted family and friends to his favorite vacation destination in Eleuthera, Bahamas. On October 4th he flew for the last time.



Wilson "Ken" Kenneth Britton, II

Ken was a 1993 graduate of Clemson University with a BS degree in Wildlife, Fisheries and Biology. He was quarry manager for Argos US in Harleyville, South Carolina. Ken was an avid hunter and loved to be outdoors. Most importantly, he loved his two children, Madeleine and Wilson and spending time with them.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbia, South Carolina
Textron; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

http://registry.faa.gov/N401HH




Location: Salters, SC
Accident Number: ERA18FA004
Date & Time: 10/04/2017, 1745 EDT
Registration: N401HH
Aircraft: CESSNA 401
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 4, 2017, about 1745 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 401B, N401HH, was destroyed when it impacted terrain while maneuvering near a private airport in Salters, South Carolina. The commercial pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which departed the airport about 1730.

A witness at the airport reported seeing the airplane take off from the private grass runway. About 10 minutes later, the airplane made a low pass over the runway, then entered a steep climb. The witness stated that the airplane rolled left, the left wing dropped, and the airplane rolled inverted and began descending in a nose-low attitude. The airplane rolled to a level attitude before it disappeared behind trees. The wreckage was located in an open field that was surrounded by trees about 1 mile southwest of the runway.

Another witness, who was about 1/2 mile from the end of the runway, described hearing the airplane make what sounded like a "high speed pass down the runway." He saw the airplane in a wings-level attitude, then it "snapped a barrel roll." He said the airplane rolled wings level over an open field about 100 to 150 yards before the tree line, and he subsequently heard the airplane impact trees.

The first witness recorded a cell phone video of the airplane just before impact; the footage was consistent with his statement. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Private
Age: 66, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/27/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  15000 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multi-engine land, instrument airplane, and rotorcraft-helicopter. He also held an airframe and powerplant mechanic certificate. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration second-class airman medical certificate was issued on July 27, 2017, with the limitation, "must have glasses for near vision." At that time, he reported 15,000 total hours of flight experience. The pilot's flight experience at the time of the accident could not be determined. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N401HH
Model/Series: 401 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1969
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 401B0004
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/15/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 6301 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 9 Hours
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5557.1 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TSIO-520-E9
Registered Owner: HADDOCK FLYING SERVICE INC
Rated Power: 300 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

The six-seat, low-wing, retractable-gear airplane was manufactured in 1969. It was powered by two Continental TSIO-520E, 300-horsepower engines, driving McCauley three-bladed, constant-speed, full-feathering propellers.

The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on August 5, 2017, at 5557.1 total aircraft hours. The airplane had accrued 9.2 hours since the previous annual inspection on March 25, 2016. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCKI, 66 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1735 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 22°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 4700 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction:  
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.28 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 17°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point:  Salters, SC (PVT)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination:  Salters, SC (PVT)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1730 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

At 1735, the weather reported at Williamsburg Regional Airport, Kingstree, South Carolina, about 14 miles north of the accident site, included calm wind, 10 statute miles visibility, scattered clouds at 4,700 ft and 6,500 ft, temperature 26°C, dew point 17°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.28 inches of mercury.

Airport Information

Airport: PVT (PVT)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 70 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Vegetation
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None



Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  33.496389, -79.957222 (est)

The airplane was examined at the accident site and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path began in trees about 50 ft above the ground and was oriented on a magnetic heading about 280°. The main wreckage came to rest inverted on a heading of 230° and was consumed by a postcrash fire.

The outboard portion of the left wing was located at the initial tree strike. Fragments of the airframe were located at a second tree strike about 350 ft from the initial tree strike. The outboard portion of the right wing was located about 320 ft beyond the second tree strike. The main wreckage was about 930 ft from the initial tree strike; the right engine was about 90 ft past the main wreckage.

The flaps and the landing gear were retracted. Flight control cable continuity was confirmed from the all flight control surfaces to the cockpit area. Flight control cable continuity within the cockpit could not be confirmed due to fire damage. All cockpit instrumentation was destroyed by fire.

The left engine was separated from the nacelle and the wing and found inverted by the left wing. All six cylinders remained attached at their bases; the cooling fins sustained impact damage. The engine was manually rotated and thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders. A borescope inspection of the cylinders revealed that the tops of all pistons and all intake and exhaust valves exhibited normal combustion signatures. The propeller separated from the engine at the attachment bolts.

The right engine was separated forward of the main wreckage; it was found inverted and attached to the wing nacelle. All six cylinders remained attached; Nos. 2, 4 and 6 displayed cooling fin impact damage. The engine was manually rotated and thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders. A borescope inspection of the cylinders revealed that the tops of all pistons and all intake and exhaust valves exhibited normal combustion signatures. The propeller was separated from the engine at the propeller flange. 



Medical And Pathological Information

The Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, conducted an autopsy of the pilot. The cause of death was listed as multiple blunt force injuries.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing of samples from the pilot. The testing was positive for ethanol at 0.185 gm/dl in the urine and .0210 gm/dl in cavity blood. N-propanol was also found in cavity blood. In addition, colchicine, 0.122 µg/ml of diphenhydramine, donepezil, acetaminophen, benazepril, naproxen, and rosuvastatin were identified in urine.

Ethanol is the intoxicant commonly found in beer, wine, and liquor. It acts as a central nervous system depressant. After ingestion, at low doses, it impairs judgement, psychomotor functioning, and vigilance; at higher doses it can cause coma and death. The effects of ethanol are generally well understood; it significantly impairs pilot performance, even at very low levels. Federal Aviation Administration regulations prohibit any person from acting or attempting to act as a crewmember of a civil aircraft while having 0.040 gm/dl or more ethanol in the blood. Because ingested alcohol is distributed throughout the body, levels from different postmortem tissues are usually similar after ingestion. N-propanol is a type of alcohol that is produced in body tissues after death.

Colchicine is a prescription medication used to treat and prevent attacks of gout. It is not considered impairing.

Diphenhydramine is a sedating antihistamine used to treat allergy symptoms and as a sleep aid. It is available over the counter under the trade names Benadryl and Unisom. Diphenhydramine carries the following FDA warning: "may impair mental and/or physical ability required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks (e.g., driving, operating heavy machinery)." Compared to other antihistamines, diphenhydramine causes marked sedation; this is the rationale for its use as a sleep aid. Altered mood and impaired cognitive and psychomotor performance may also be observed. In fact, in a driving simulator study, a single dose of diphenhydramine impaired driving ability more than a blood alcohol concentration of 0.100%. The therapeutic range for diphenhydramine is 0.0250 to 0.1120 µg/ml. Diphenhydramine undergoes pos mortem redistribution where, after death, the drug can leach from storage sites back into blood.

Donepezil is a prescription medication often marketed with the name Aricept and used to slow the progression of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. While it is not considered impairing, the underlying disease is.

Hydroxychloroquine is an antimalarial medication that has anti-inflammatory properties that lead to its use in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. It is not considered cognitively impairing.

Acetaminophen is an analgesic available over the counter, commonly marketed with the name Tylenol. Benazepril is a blood pressure medication. Naproxen is an anti-inflammatory drug available over the counter and commonly marketed with the names Naprosyn and Aleve. Rosuvastatin is a cholesterol lowering medication commonly marketed with the name Crestor. None of these substances are considered impairing.

According to records obtained from the pilot's most recent primary care physician, he initiated care with the doctor on February 2, 2017. In the review of symptoms with the pilot, the physician noted, "no memory loss." The physician performed a mini-mental status exam and the pilot scored 28/30 points. He recalled only one of three objects after 5 minutes. The physician diagnosed "memory loss," but did not perform other testing. 

Three months later, the pilot returned to the doctor. According to the review of symptoms, the pilot denied episodes of weakness, loss of consciousness, memory impairment, difficulty concentrating, or any other neurologic or psychiatric issues. His neurologic exam was documented as normal; however, he was diagnosed with essential tremor, memory loss, and transient ischemic attack as well as hypertension. The physician added another blood pressure medication and prescribed donepezil for memory loss.



NTSB Identification: ERA18FA004
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 04, 2017 in Salters, SC
Aircraft: CESSNA 401B, registration: N401HH
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 4, 2017, about 1745 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 401B, N401HH, was destroyed after it impacted terrain while maneuvering near Salters, South Carolina. The commercial pilot and a passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

A witness at the airport reported seeing the airplane takeoff. About 10 minutes later, the pilot made a low pass over the grass strip and then began a steep climb. The witness stated the airplane rolled left, the left wing dropped and the airplane was inverted and descending in a nose low attitude. The airplane's wings were level before it disappeared behind trees. The airplane was located in an open field that was surrounded by trees about 1 mile southwest from the departure airport.

The airplane was examined at the accident site and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path began in trees about 50 ft above the ground, and was oriented about 280° magnetic. The main wreckage came to rest inverted, facing 230° and was consumed by a postcrash fire.

The outboard portion of the left wing was located at the initial tree strike. Fragments of the airframe were located at a second tree strike, about 350 ft from the initial tree strike. The outboard portion of the right wing was located about 320 ft beyond the second tree strike. The main wreckage was about 930 ft from the initial tree strike, the right engine was about 90 ft past the main wreckage.

The flaps and the landing gear were in the up position. Flight control cable continuity was confirmed from the all flight control surfaces to the cockpit area. Flight control cable continuity within the cockpit could not be confirmed due to fire damage. All cockpit instrumentation was destroyed by fire.

The left engine was separated from the nacelle and the wing, and found inverted by the left wing. All six cylinders remained attached at their bases, the cooling fins sustained impact damage. The engine was manually rotated, thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders. A borescope inspection of the cylinders revealed the tops of all pistons and all intake and exhaust valves exhibited normal combustion signatures. The propeller separated from the engine at the attachment bolts.

The right engine was separated forward of the main wreckage; it was found inverted and attached to the wing nacelle. All six cylinders remained attached; Nos. 2, 4 and 6 had cooling fin impact damage. The engine was manually rotated and thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders. A borescope inspection of the cylinders revealed the tops of all pistons and all intake and exhaust valves exhibited normal combustion signatures. The propeller was separated from the engine at the propeller flange.

The six-seat, low-wing, retractable-gear equipped airplane was manufactured in 1969. It was powered by two Continental TSIO-520E, 300-horsepower engines, driving McCauley three-bladed, constant speed, full feathering propellers.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with an airplane single and multiengine land, and rotorcraft/helicopter ratings. He also held ratings for single and multiengine instrument airplane, and airframe and powerplant mechanic. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration second-class airman medical certificate was issued on July 27, 2017, with the limitation, "must have glasses for near vision." At that time, he reported 15,000 total flight hours.

At 1735, the weather reported at Williamsburg Regional Airport (CKI), Kingstree, South Carolina, about 14 miles north of the accident site, included wind calm, visibility 10 statute miles; scattered clouds at 4,700 ft, scattered clouds at 6,500 ft; temperature 26° C, dew point 17° C, and altimeter 30.28 inches of mercury.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Total time doesn't matter.

The only hour that matters is the one you are getting ready to fly.

RIP

Anonymous said...

Sounds like he was too intoxicated to be Flying as PIC!

Anonymous said...

Sounds like he was a bit intoxicated!

Anonymous said...

Who says aviation isn’t about judgement? Right!!