Saturday, October 13, 2018

Beech A36 Bonanza 36, registered to and operated by GTA Air Inc, N24LF: Accident occurred July 03, 2017 near El Paso International Airport (KELP), El Paso County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Hartzell Propeller; Piqua, Ohio
GTA Air Inc; Addison, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N24LF

Location: El Paso, TX
Accident Number: CEN17LA255
Date & Time: 07/03/2017, 2006 MDT
Registration: N24LF
Aircraft: BEECH A36
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Powerplant sys/comp malf/fail
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled 

On July 3, 2017, about 2006 mountain daylight time, a single engine Beech A36 airplane, N24LF, lost engine power during the initial climb after takeoff from El Paso International Airport (ELP), El Paso, Texas. The commercial pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by GTA Air, Inc., under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) visual flight rules flight plan had been filed for the flight. The non-scheduled domestic cargo flight departed ELP and was en route to Dallas Love Field Airport (DAL), Dallas, Texas.

According to the pilot, he climbed to an altitude of 4,800 ft and the engine lost power. The pilot reversed course towards ELP and intended to land on runway 26R. The glide of the airplane did not reach the runway and the wings and fuselage were substantially damaged during the forced landing to a field.

The airplane was equipped with a Continental IO-520-BB87B engine. The engine had been modified with the addition of a Tornado Alley Turbo Whirlwind system under a supplemental type certificate. Examination of the airframe and engine revealed thermal damage concentrated on the lower left side of the engine. The induction tube, forward of the turbocharger compressor, was melted and the remains were found in the cowling below. The induction wye exhibited a hole emanating outward from the turbine wheel. The engine, magnetos, and related systems were otherwise unremarkable.

The turbocharger on the accident airplane was not part of the original modification. Examination and disassembly of the Hartzell Engine Technologies turbocharger (SN HSGL00002) revealed that the turbocharger had been reconfigured with a different compressor housing and the addition of wear washers. The turbocharger had originally been sold to the operator on a factory remanufactured engine from Continental Motors in 2015 (TSIO-520-EB5B – SN 1031058). According to the operator, they did not repair or modify the turbocharger, they only loosened and tightened the V-band clamp and loosened and tightened the hot side bolts. Investigators were unable to determine who modified the turbocharger prior to its installation on the accident airplane.

Evidence of high temperatures and thermal distress were noted on the turbine housing exhaust flange, the thrust collar, thrust spacer, and back plate. The turbine and compressor wheels exhibited evidence of rub within their housings. The turbine wheel hub exhibited evidence of hard rub with the center housing seal bore area. The turbine housing exhibited red coloring on the internal surfaces, bubbling of the exhaust flange, and spiraling tongue erosion, which according to Hartzell are consistent with high turbine inlet temperatures. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial; Private
Age: 41, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/18/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/02/2017
Flight Time:  1085.5 hours (Total, all aircraft), 206.6 hours (Total, this make and model), 1004.2 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 212.6 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 101.6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3.7 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BEECH
Registration: N24LF
Model/Series: A36 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1980
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Utility
Serial Number: E-1665
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/09/2017, AAIP
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3780 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:  12899.3 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: T.C.M.
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-520-BB87B
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 285 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation: KELP, 3961 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 1951 MDT
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 12000 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 150°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 36°C / 6°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: El Paso, TX (KELP)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: Dallas, TX (KDAL)
Type of Clearance: VFR; VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 2000 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class C

Airport Information

Airport: El Paso International Airport (KELP)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 3961 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 31.812222, -106.382778 (est)

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA255
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Monday, July 03, 2017 in El Paso, TX
Aircraft: BEECH A36, registration: N24LF
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 3, 2017, about 2006 mountain daylight time, a single engine Beech A36 airplane lost engine power after takeoff from El Paso International Airport (ELP), El Paso, Texas. The commercial pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight plan had been filed for the flight. The flight had departed ELP and was en route to Dallas Love Field Airport (DAL), Dallas, Texas.

According to the pilot, he was climbing to an altitude of 4,800 feet when the engine lost power. The pilot reversed course towards the airport and intended to land on runway 26R. The glide of the airplane did not reach the runway and the wings and fuselage were substantially damaged during the forced landing to the field.

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