Sunday, September 30, 2018

Grumman American AA-5 Traveler, N9582L: Accident occurred March 18, 2016 near East Side Airport (3TS0), Longview, Gregg County, Texas


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Arlington / Irving, Texas
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N9582L 



Location: Longview, TX
Accident Number: CEN16LA128
Date & Time: 03/18/2016, 0807 CDT
Registration: N9582L
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AA5
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: VFR encounter with IMC
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 18, 2016, about 0807 central daylight time, a Grumman American AA-5 single-engine airplane, N9582L, was substantially damaged after it impacted trees and terrain near East Side Airport (3TS0), Longview, Texas. The pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Low instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The airplane departed 3TS0 at 0805 for a local flight.

A witness saw the southeast bound airplane enter low overcast clouds immediately after takeoff. He heard the airplane begin a left turn and then saw the airplane emerge from the base of the overcast in a nose-down, steep left bank. The pilot recovered, and then the airplane reentered the clouds. The witness heard the impact a few minutes later.

Evidence at the scene showed the airplane was northwest bound when it struck 40-foot tall trees and terrain, coming to rest inverted about 75 feet from the initial impact point. The impact resulted in the complete separation of the right wing and substantial damage to the fuselage, empennage, and left wing. An examination of the airplane and its systems revealed no anomalies.

Weather observed at 0753 at East Texas Regional Airport (GGG), located 7 miles south of 3TS0, was as follows: Wind, 110° at 5 knots; visibility, 5 miles, mist; ceiling, 600 feet overcast,; temperature, 13° C.; dew point, 12°C.; altimeter setting, 29.86 inches of mercury.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 58, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/19/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 500 hours (Total, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: GRUMMAN
Registration: N9582L
Model/Series: AA5
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1974
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: AA5-0582
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-320-E2G
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGGG, 373 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 7 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0753 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 185°
Lowest Cloud Condition:  / 600 ft agl
Visibility: 5 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 600 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 110°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.86 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 13°C / 12°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - Mist; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Longview, TX (3TS0)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Longview, TX (3TS0)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0805 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: East Side (3TS0)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 373 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 13
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2400 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  32.505000, -94.698333 (est)



NTSB Identification: CEN16LA128 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, March 18, 2016 in Longview, TX
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA 5, registration: N9582L
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 18, 2016, about 0807 central daylight time, a Gulfstream American AA-5 single-engine airplane, N9582L, was substantially damaged after it impacted trees and terrain during initial climb near East Side Airport (3TS0), Longview, Texas. The pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Low instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed and a flight plan had not been filed. At the time of the accident the airplane was departing 3TS0 for a local flight.

A witness saw the southeast bound airplane enter low overcast clouds immediately after take-off. He heard the airplane begin a left turn and then saw the airplane exit the base of the overcast in a nose-down steep left bank. The airplane recovered, reentered the clouds, and the witness heard the sounds of impact a few minutes later. Evidence at the scene showed the airplane was northwest bound when it impacted 40 foot tall trees and then terrain, coming to rest inverted about 75 feet from the initial impact location. The impact resulted in the complete separation of the entire right wing and substantial damage to the fuselage, empennage, left wing and tail surfaces. There was a significant fuel spill, but no postimpact fire.

The closest official weather reporting station was at KGGG, Longview, Texas; located 7 miles south from the accident location, At 0753 the automated surface observation system at KGGG reported wind from 110 degrees at 5 knots, visibility 6 miles, overcast clouds at 600 feet above ground level, temperature 13 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 12 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.86 inches of mercury. Data from the U. S. Naval Observatory showed that sunrise occurred at 0725.

3 comments:

daveyl123 said...

What do you folks think of this idea: Pilots could be trained for a special rating to be called a "Limited Instrument Rating". With this qualification, pilots will be authorized by ATC to depart airports under VFR conditions, climb through cloud layers to the tops and proceed VFR above the overcast. The rating would also permit pilots to descend through clouds to VMC conditions below. Accidents like this are all too common, as VFR Only pilots suddenly find themselves without a means to descend through clouds at their destination, low on fuel and with no alternate.

Gougmonk said...

daveyl123, you are describing and full instrument rating and a typical instrument flight: take off IFR, fly to destination either in clouds, between layers or on top, then descend IFR to a safe landing either IFR or VFR.

Instrument flying is serious business. An instrument rating is not difficult to obtain, and, once obtained, should be looked upon as a passport for further learning. This guy was extremely lucky to be alive and fortunately did not have passengers.

Anonymous said...

It doesn't matter what kind of rating you come up with if the individual fails to engage their brain ... Either before or after the engine is started.